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Old 03-29-2015, 02:36 PM   #31
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For what it's worth, the only time I've ever seen pvc for water lines was outdoor underground irrigation. I used to like CPVC for its quick and easy cutting and gluing, but I've found it becomes really brittle after time. Try to cut and it can shatter. I'm with Joe, pex and sharkbites are the greatest
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Old 03-29-2015, 09:06 PM   #32
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Ben, in my area PVC is allowed for potable water outside the structure's footprint.
after some research..i found that some areas due allow pvc for main water line installs up to the house ..but not inside,....why is anybodys guess only that the code provides a list of materials used and that they rely on the manufactor of the pipe to provide its safety level for use....in my local area its not approved... so yes it may be approved in your area as e mentioned...sorry if i mislead anyone..ben
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Old 03-29-2015, 09:16 PM   #33
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a vast majority of all plumbing jobs ive seen (like 80%) have schedule 40 pvc pipe for cold water & cpvc for hot. inside & outside the home. all others are usually old school iron, copper & very rarely I will come across some pex.

I have never heard of a rule before forbidding pvc pipe. That is like all I even see sold in big box stores. sch 40 pvc & cpvc.
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Old 03-29-2015, 09:41 PM   #34
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ok to clear up some confusion....in 1 st post ...thougth op was talking about regular glue up pvc.... which would be prohibited because of the solvent used.. main water line have been run in plastic like this in areas around me but not allowed in my area...ok not to make excuses but iam on mild pain killer from a root canal that i had done...boy am i going down hill can't even hold a little pain pill
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Old 03-30-2015, 12:07 AM   #35
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So...just so I am fully clear for all future plumbing I come across. This



Is NOT allowed for potable water inside buildings?
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Old 03-30-2015, 03:56 AM   #36
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So...just so I am fully clear for all future plumbing I come across. This



Is NOT allowed for potable water inside buildings?
Where I am, the hot and cold water supply lines are required to be the same material, so if you use cpvc for the hot you have to use it for the cold.
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Old 03-30-2015, 07:43 AM   #37
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ok to clear up some confusion....in 1 st post ...thougth op was talking about regular glue up pvc.... which would be prohibited because of the solvent used.. main water line have been run in plastic like this in areas around me but not allowed in my area...ok not to make excuses but iam on mild pain killer from a root canal that i had done...boy am i going down hill can't even hold a little pain pill
Why would PVC not be allowed because of the solvent, but CPVC be OK? They both use similar solvent cement.

In my area regular PVC is used inside and outside for cold water. Often PVC is used for cold and CPVC is used for hot. No requirement to use the same material. If you had copper existing you can repair or make additions with PEX (and is commonly done).

PEX has taken over the plumbing market in this area. I never see copper or CPVC used any more. PVC is the standard from the meter to the house. (Meters are located at the street.)
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Old 03-30-2015, 02:55 PM   #38
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Why would PVC not be allowed because of the solvent, but CPVC be OK? They both use similar solvent cement.

In my area regular PVC is used inside and outside for cold water. Often PVC is used for cold and CPVC is used for hot. No requirement to use the same material. If you had copper existing you can repair or make additions with PEX (and is commonly done).

PEX has taken over the plumbing market in this area. I never see copper or CPVC used any more. PVC is the standard from the meter to the house. (Meters are located at the street.)
the main water lines in my area installed to code do not allow glued joints ...they are one continous run with compression adapters at the ends of the pipe....no fittings between curb stop and meter....Iam with the rest of you guys if pvc glue pipe can be used outside why not inside...I don't and have not used either...
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Old 03-30-2015, 05:54 PM   #39
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PVC is not allowed inside a house because it can not handle hot water. The burst pressure you see on the pipe is at 78 degrees or something like that. Interior water sometimes can allow hot back flow down a code line. Hence it is not approved for water distribution (interior piping).

So your choice is CPVC, Copper, Galvanized or pex.
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Old 03-31-2015, 10:26 AM   #40
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Make the switch to pex. You will be happy you did. The tool cost has come down to around $50. With pex you can have longer runs with less fittings which means less potential for a leaks. The skill level required to run pex is simpler than cutting and glueing.
Over the years when doing a large project, I would buy one new tool that I absolutely had to have!
I only need to replace the supply lines in the photos from my original post. Is it worth switching to PEX for such a short run? If the tool itself is like $50, I'm not sure I'll do it. Is it possible to connect CPVC and PEX together?
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Old 03-31-2015, 11:38 AM   #41
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Yes you can connect your CPVC to Pex with a sharkbite (push connect) coupling. My opinion on any tool cost is once I have it I will always have it and be ready for the next job. As your skills and confidence grow the project sizes increase and so to will your tool collection. Even at one tool at time. Good luck with your project.
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Old 03-31-2015, 11:45 AM   #42
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There is also a fitting that cements to CPVC at 1 side and has a PEX barb on the other.
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Old 03-31-2015, 11:53 AM   #43
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never used one but I am sure it would work fine and be less expensive than the shark bite, (unless you were buying a can of glue and primer for one or two connections)
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