Replacing Water Heater - Plumbing - DIY Home Improvement | DIYChatroom
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Plumbing

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Display Modes
Old 05-30-2015, 01:26 PM   #16
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: DFW, TX
Posts: 31
Rewards Points: 38
Default


Alright, I'm likely making this more complicated than it really needs to be.

To add the expansion tank, I need to figure out the placement and routing of the cold water so that the expansion tank is attached to a tee connector.

Because my lines are within 10" of the water heater itself, this will require me to extend the cold water across a wall and back. I'll have to secure the cold water pipe to the wall and strap the tank as well, correct?
Attached Thumbnails
Replacing Water Heater-wh0003.jpg   Replacing Water Heater-wh004.jpg  
Zen1300 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 05-30-2015, 03:39 PM   #17
Plumber
 
TheEplumber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: North Idaho
Posts: 11,457
Rewards Points: 290
Default


What I would do:
Screw a 3/4" galvanized tee on top the CW tank nipple. Put a 3/4"x 6" galv. nipple into the tee branch, which should be pointing away from the Bvent.
Screw a 90 on the nipple- looking up. Then the tank on top the 90.
The top of the tee will get a short nipple the receive your nut from a new flex line.
The galvanized fittings are rigid enough to support the tank.
material list-
1- 3/4 tee
1- 3/4 90
1-6" nipple
1- 21/2" nipple
__________________
When posting in forums, letting us know your location will help others give better feedback/advice/solutions to your questions
TheEplumber is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to TheEplumber For This Useful Post:
tylernt (05-30-2015)
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 05-30-2015, 07:14 PM   #18
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: DFW, TX
Posts: 31
Rewards Points: 38
Default


Like I said, I was overcomplicating it. I hadn't realized the tank could be inverted. Based on your description, this is how I visualize it... (sorry, I'm a visual type of guy).
Attached Images
 
Zen1300 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 05-30-2015, 10:04 PM   #19
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: North Carolina, USA
Posts: 5,402
Rewards Points: 7,044
Default


Usually the only complaint about push to fit devices is that people don't trust they won't ever leak. So some people won't use them in concealed areas. Personally I trust them (I've certainly seen soldered copper joints leak as well.) But in your case it is exposed, so I see no reason you wouldn't want to use one. Super convenient and worth the couple extra bucks, unless you just happen to enjoy sweating copper and already have all the equipment and materials.
jeffnc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2015, 10:06 PM   #20
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: North Carolina, USA
Posts: 5,402
Rewards Points: 7,044
Default


I believe most pressure tanks call for support. I see them unsupported all the time whe used with copper pipes. I use PEX myself, so of course I wouldn't install a tank in that manner unless it were well supported.
jeffnc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2015, 10:46 PM   #21
Plumber
 
TheEplumber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: North Idaho
Posts: 11,457
Rewards Points: 290
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by Zen1300 View Post
Like I said, I was overcomplicating it. I hadn't realized the tank could be inverted. Based on your description, this is how I visualize it... (sorry, I'm a visual type of guy).
That is basically the what I "tried" to describe. I put the tee vertical with a 6" nipple in the horizontal- then the tank. Off the top of the tee is the flex and ball valve.
The idea is to get the tank away from the flue, yet allow the galv. pipe to support the exp. tank.

For what it's worth, you could put the tank on it's side down at the platform and pipe pex to it and it should still pass inspections. Elevation should not matter- just secure
__________________
When posting in forums, letting us know your location will help others give better feedback/advice/solutions to your questions
TheEplumber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2015, 07:29 AM   #22
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: DFW, TX
Posts: 31
Rewards Points: 38
Default


I didn't think it would support the tank horizontally when full of water.
Zen1300 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2015, 05:29 PM   #23
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: DFW, TX
Posts: 31
Rewards Points: 38
Default


I measured the pressure at my hose for 24 hours and it peaked at 82psi.

It looks like I can put a Pressure Regulator Valve at the house shutoff valve (near the hose in front). There is a main shutoff valve with the meter at the curb, but that would be harder to get to I think.

I also have this on the grass in the front - believe it to be part of the sprinkler system, but I've not see this configuration before.

Replacing Water Heater-wh006.jpg

I assume that adding a PRV might change my sprinkler coverage.

I'm ready to submit my permit application and then it is time to get started. I'll post completion pics when everything is done.
Zen1300 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2015, 04:09 PM   #24
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: DFW, TX
Posts: 31
Rewards Points: 38
Default


Alright, so adding the pressure reducer is the latest challenge.

It looks like I'll need to dig out the main next to the house (not the main with the meter at the curb).

I dug out some of the dirt just to see what I was going to have to deal with. I expected a single pipe into the house, but found that it had a smaller tee on it.

Any ideas what this is for?

It looks like what I need to do is expand this hole to reveal more of the pipe so that I can sweat a new run with a ball valve and a pressure reducing valve. Then put a larger valve box in its place to accommodate everything.

Just replacing a water heater has progressively gotten more challenging.
Attached Thumbnails
Replacing Water Heater-wh-1.jpg  
Zen1300 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2015, 04:30 PM   #25
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 4,963
Rewards Points: 3,492
Default


Could be for anything like water heater, outside hose bib, etc. Just a guess. Have to trace out where in comes in at the house and find out what it goes to. Just a suggestion.

Others will be along with more advice/ideas.
jmon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2015, 04:34 PM   #26
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 4,963
Rewards Points: 3,492
Default


Would it be easier to add the prv inside the house? From the pic that hole looks rather tight to work in. You may have to add a seperate 1/2 pvr to that 1/2 inch line when you find out what it goes to.

If it goes to an outside hose bib, I wouldn't worry about it. Don't know if you have a boiler, they usually have a separate prv on the incoming line set at 15psi.

You state your incoming psi is 82. I agree anything over 80 should be addressed. Hope you can add one somehow without too much work.

Please wait for the plumbers to respond, they will know for sure what to do. Thanks.

Last edited by jmon; 06-04-2015 at 04:53 PM.
jmon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2015, 07:00 PM   #27
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: DFW, TX
Posts: 31
Rewards Points: 38
Default


Where would I put it then?

You're right. That smaller pipe must go to the hose bib right next to it. Duh.

But the main line would enter the house and split to the various faucets. I assumed the valve needed to be before entering the house. I didn't find any alternatives when I Google.
Zen1300 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2015, 07:48 PM   #28
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 4,963
Rewards Points: 3,492
Default


Not necessarily. Find the point of entry where it enters the house, sometimes there is enough pipe to work with before it branches out and you can put a prv there.
jmon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2015, 07:56 PM   #29
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: DFW, TX
Posts: 31
Rewards Points: 38
Default


That pipe enters under the concrete slab at my son's bedroom. The closest faucet is the guest bathroom.

I would have to cut out drywall in my son's bedroom. I'm fine with drywall, but it seems easier to dig out around the pipe.
Zen1300 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2015, 08:10 PM   #30
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 4,963
Rewards Points: 3,492
Default


I understand. Do whatever is easiest for you. Seems like you will have to make the hole a little bigger so you can get the prv on. Myself, I would prefer to deal with the drywall and put an access panel in so it's easily accessible for future repairs, adjusting water pressure, etc.

Remember, they do go bad. So make sure you get one with unions on both ends for easy swap out in the future. Something like this. Just a suggestion.







Last edited by jmon; 06-04-2015 at 08:19 PM.
jmon is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Water heater issues?!? NJdan Plumbing 1 06-04-2015 07:42 PM
Question on return line for water heater daluu Plumbing 10 09-09-2012 10:38 PM
elevate electric water heater? crankbait09 Plumbing 18 04-18-2011 11:35 AM
Pressure drop across water heater, low hot water flow HVAC_NW Plumbing 2 01-17-2011 10:43 PM
Solar hot water indatom123 Green Home Improvement 0 12-19-2010 12:01 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts