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Old 06-21-2016, 09:21 PM   #16
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Re: Replacing an old pipe bend and slope


For anyone following this I recently did a dry fitting of the PVC where I hanged it off the existing pipe. I used the same sized spacer on each end and then at the bend I adjusted until I had a 1/4" slope on both horizontal runs. Here's a pic:
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Old 09-20-2016, 11:08 PM   #17
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Re: Replacing an old pipe bend and slope


I worked on this over the summer but I didn't get around to updating everyone. I installed the PVC and I'm almost done except for some bracing. Here's what's happened since I last wrote:

I cut the bad pipe into pieces using an angle grinder with a 1/16" metal cut off disc. I went through like 7 discs (I also cut up some vent piping). It was really messy, there was dust everywhere and I came close to getting little bits of metal in my eye even with a face shield and face-conforming safety googles. A few times my eye was irritated but luckily it cleared up. I would guess the dust got in through the google vents, there was just so much of it.

Here's a picture of the temporary strapping I used to hold the pipe so the pieces wouldn't fall to the ground:


I had read somewhere that you could use a chisel and slowly tap around the diameter of the pipe and it would break eventually. Well, I tried that and it never did. After a full cut at each end with the grinder to free the bad section I tried working it with a mini-sledge. That worked sometimes, if I cut at least half way through and hit it a bunch. So mostly I used the grinder wheel to do whole cuts.

Next I melted the lead out of the cast iron hubs using MAPP gas. Wow was that a huge pain in the ass, likely very dangerous and it took a very long time but it did work. Then I used a wire wheel to clean the hub. Unfortunately I do not have any pictures of this step. If anyone is reading this I would stay away from this at all costs. I had an existing house trap with a hub and the pipe going into that hub was cracked on its way in so I couldn't just cut the pipe at some earlier point.

The hubs had an unusual ID of 5.25" (Cast Iron XH Somerville? I think) and the Fernco 44UX-405 donut was too small, according to Fernco. They ended up sending me a lipless donut Fernco D428-405. But for extra protection I got a second multi-tite XH serco donut V94004 and basically did a double gasket on the horizontal hub. (The vertical one I just used the serco.) The double gasket involved cutting a 1/4" off the fernco and putting it in all the way first. With these two donuts there is no sitting water in the hub since the double donut fills the entire depth. Here's a pic:



Next I had to insert PVC in the gasketed hub. Also another thing I don't recommend. I actually pulled PVC from a different gasket and found the PVC had bent in shape over time (just several days) because of the pressure the gasket put on it. If I had to do it again I would have taken a short piece of cast iron pipe and put it in the gasket then used a transition coupling to PVC.

That cast-iron to PVC may also be code, NYS code on sanitary drainage says:
Quote:
705.18.4 ... Joints between plastic pipe and cast-iron hub pipe shall be made by a caulked joint or a mechanical compression joint.
Anyway... here's a pic of inserting the PVC. I beveled the pipe and used duck butter for lube and some chain clamps to really force it in.



And here's what it looks like now that it's installed. The pipe that goes up and to the right is the vent for the house trap.



So now I just have to add some more pipe supports. PVC support spacing is a maximum of 4ft according to NYS code on pipe supports. Also it requires sway bracing at turns, which I've never seen and sounds expensive:
Quote:
308.6 Sway bracing.
Rigid support sway bracing shall be provided at changes in direction greater than 45 degrees (0.79 rad) for pipe sizes 4 inches (102 mm) and larger.
Anyone a plumber in NY or had to use sway bracing on 4" PVC?

Last edited by Deck; 09-20-2016 at 11:27 PM.
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