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Old 06-05-2019, 05:01 PM   #1
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PVC Stack replacement (with cast)


Sick and tired of the noise in my PVC waste stack. Going to remodel the kitchen and the chance to replace the stack with cast iron seems now. Have a bath above (3rd floor), the kitchen and bath (2nd floor) share the stack wall, and the first floor bath below. What am I looking at cost. Thanks, G-
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Old 06-05-2019, 05:25 PM   #2
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Re: PVC Stack replacement (with cast)


About 20 grand or so.
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Old 06-06-2019, 08:25 AM   #3
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Re: PVC Stack replacement (with cast)


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About 20 grand or so.
seriously please.
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Old 06-06-2019, 08:42 AM   #4
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Re: PVC Stack replacement (with cast)


Are you planning to replace all 3 floors (plus attic)?
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Old 06-06-2019, 08:57 AM   #5
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Re: PVC Stack replacement (with cast)


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Are you planning to replace all 3 floors (plus attic)?
Contractor will have access to the pipe to do all three. We have no attic. Got a quotes of 1500, 2250, 3600 and 5200. Trying to find out what is likely as these are all over the place.
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Old 06-06-2019, 03:53 PM   #6
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Re: PVC Stack replacement (with cast)


No one can answer your question.

First, we don't know where you are located so we nave no idea of labor rates.


Second, going back to cast iron is going backward in technology.

Cast iron was great in its time but it also has its draw backs. It is heavy and difficult to work with. The interior is not as smooth as PVC so blockages are more likely to occur. Repair is extremely costly.

It is assembled with lead and oakum joints. That not only means special tools but also the skill set to use them. Finding a plumber today with those skills will be difficult and costly. Cast iron is heavy, it must be supported. Which is why you see cast iron stacks, one section of pipe supported by the section below. You don't see long sections of cast iron pipe laid horizontally like you see PVC drainage and venting.

Given its limited residential use (if any), its supply will also be limited meaning that the material will be costly.
With your brief description no one an evaluate or estimate the amount of material or labor required or even if it is possible. No one could evaluate the possibility of finding a plumber in you area willing to under take the task. Those old plumbers that started out as a helper, humping pipe from the truck, are now probably retired with back problems.

If you do find a plumber willing to do the job you should certainly verify that he has the skills to work with cast iron and to make the lead and oakum joints.

You expressed your dissatisfaction with your current plumbing system as being noise. Wouldn't it be more logical to resolve or correct that problem rather than replace your system.
Noise is vibration. Vibration transmitted through the air. Insulation of your drainage pipes of should greatly reduce if not eliminate the problem. There would be no need to insulate the vents since no water flows through them, only air. You could conceivable simply fill the stud cavities that the drainage pipes run through with fiberglass bat insulation or you could fill the stud cavities with expanding foam insulation.
You could engage a professional or you could do this yourself. If you were to chose the bat insulation you would simply fill the stud cavity with the bats of fiberglass. If you were to choose the foam insulation you could simply fill the stud cavity with cans of expanding foam insulation. Sawing off the excess that extends out beyond the stud surface with a hand saw.
Since there are different types of expanding spray foam insulation you should probably consult with a professional to determine which type would be best suited for your use.


The cost of material to do this would be insignificant. The time and labor minimal.


If insulating in this manner does not meet your requirements of noise abatement the cost of removal would also be insignificant.
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Last edited by hkstroud; 06-06-2019 at 04:05 PM.
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Old 06-06-2019, 10:59 PM   #7
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Re: PVC Stack replacement (with cast)


Cast iron no-hub pipe is really not that bad- if you know the tricks and are use to working with it. I am involved with 2 NH pipe jobs at the moment and they're going real smooth. The days of lead and oakum are long gone. We use no-hub couplings now.
And it's about the quietest pipe there is. We often use it in high end homes when noise is an issue.
But, it is also expensive. Depending on the size, figure $10-$25 per fitting- plus bands-- and double the labor value.

As for your numbers spread. Some don't want the work and will bid high to make it worth their time. Others are just plain expensive and possibly worth it.
Others price low because they lowball and aren't worth the risk. Still others are just right...
Which of your bids to choose? I couldn't begin to say and I've been in the trade for a long time. I have also never seen your project.... best to chat some more with your plumbers and make sure they're comparing apples to apples for starters. You don't need to start a bidding war, just educate yourself on what's in their scope of work.
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Old 06-07-2019, 06:51 AM   #8
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Re: PVC Stack replacement (with cast)


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.......
You could engage a professional or you could do this yourself. If you were to chose the bat insulation you would simply fill the stud cavity with the bats of fiberglass. If you were to choose the foam insulation you could simply fill the stud cavity with cans of expanding foam insulation. Sawing off the excess that extends out beyond the stud surface with a hand saw.
Since there are different types of expanding spray foam insulation you should probably consult with a professional to determine which type would be best suited for your use.


The cost of material to do this would be insignificant. The time and labor minimal.


If insulating in this manner does not meet your requirements of noise abatement the cost of removal would also be insignificant.
Bats of insulation do not work. Sound travels throught less dense materials or the path of least resistance. At the bare minimum, I would consider expandable spray foam. HOWEVER, the spray foam guys I had in make it very clear that it will only knock the noise down about 20-25% and they are not getting as good results as people want to believe. Iron kills sound because of density. Not worth it for 20%.
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Old 06-07-2019, 06:58 AM   #9
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Re: PVC Stack replacement (with cast)


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Originally Posted by TheEplumber View Post
Cast iron no-hub pipe is really not that bad- if you know the tricks and are use to working with it. I am involved with 2 NH pipe jobs at the moment and they're going real smooth. The days of lead and oakum are long gone. We use no-hub couplings now.
And it's about the quietest pipe there is. We often use it in high end homes when noise is an issue.
But, it is also expensive. Depending on the size, figure $10-$25 per fitting- plus bands-- and double the labor value.

As for your numbers spread. Some don't want the work and will bid high to make it worth their time. Others are just plain expensive and possibly worth it.
Others price low because they lowball and aren't worth the risk. Still others are just right...
Which of your bids to choose? I couldn't begin to say and I've been in the trade for a long time. I have also never seen your project.... best to chat some more with your plumbers and make sure they're comparing apples to apples for starters. You don't need to start a bidding war, just educate yourself on what's in their scope of work.

Thanks thats what I figured. One of the contractors was talking about 4" x 10' sections. It just seems that this is the time to do it. I work pre-dawn, and that morning s#!t seems to wake everyone up when I leave. Also, the 1st floor room where the stack comes down (next) will likely have infants' and 4 year olds sleeping...cause everyone loves the guy that wakes the infant up at dawn.
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Old 06-07-2019, 08:45 AM   #10
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Re: PVC Stack replacement (with cast)


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We have no attic.
So your 2nd floor ceiling joists have drywall on the bottom chord and roof sheathing on top chord?
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Old 06-07-2019, 09:03 AM   #11
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Re: PVC Stack replacement (with cast)


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So your 2nd floor ceiling joists have drywall on the bottom chord and roof sheathing on top chord?

3rd floor but yes....3rd floor ceiling goes drywall (actually popcorn), 2x8,10,12 structure insulated between drywall and sheathing, felt, shingle....I believe.
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