Pressurized Well Tank Replacement - Plumbing - DIY Home Improvement | DIYChatroom
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Plumbing

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Display Modes
Old 06-10-2015, 08:10 PM   #1
"Old" Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Maine
Posts: 143
Rewards Points: 177
Default

Pressurized Well Tank Replacement


Apparently the pressurized well tank (20 gallon) in our basement needs to be replaced. It's about 15 years old and shows signs of a compromised bladder.
We've been quoted $700.00 to replace the tank, on/off switch, pressure gauge and associated hardware. Looking at parts prices at the local Lowes this seems like a steep price. Tank, etc. would cost less than $250.00 at Lowes and they tell me I could easily do the work myself. The Lowes tank is steel and the quoted tank is fiberglas.
Wondering if I should bite the bullet and let my oil company do the install or tackle it myself. In general I'm thinking a $100 to $150 above parts to have someone who knows what they're doing would be money well spent. Above that, maybe I should tackle it myself.
Your thoughts?
Thanks,
Rob
RCrosby257 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 06-10-2015, 08:17 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 36,917
Rewards Points: 18,976
Default


#1, Why is an oil company doing the work?
#2, What makes you think the tank is bad not not just low on air?
Replacing a tank and gauge is repair 101 and only takes few simple tools.
__________________
When posting in forums, letting us know your location will help others give better feedback/advice/solutions to your questions
joecaption is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 06-11-2015, 06:35 AM   #3
"Old" Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Maine
Posts: 143
Rewards Points: 177
Default

Pressurized Tank


Oil company has an affiliate that handles water issues. Supposedly system should draw about 5 gallons into tank in about a minute before shutting off. It only takes in about 2 gallons in a fraction of that time before shut off. Also you hear water splashing around inside tank which (?) supposedly you should be able to. Tank was put in in 1998. I'll check air pressure this a.m.
Should be at about 18#, yes?
I'll let you know what I find out. And thanks for your reply.
RCrosby257 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 06-11-2015, 09:18 AM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Nashua, NH, USA
Posts: 8,912
Rewards Points: 3,428
Default


Provided that you have the space, installing a new pressure tank before removing the original will fix the problems due to a failed pressure tank. You can do that on your own. If you found that the original tank had really not failed then leaving it there causes no problems. (You can also remove the original pressure tank first yourself with little difficulty.)

A new gauge at the top of the new pressure tank will show the systemwide pressure when the pump is off and all faucets are off except bottoming out at the preset pressure tank pressure.

A new gauge on a T inserted into the water line anywhere will show the systemwide pressure when the pump is off and all faucets are off.

I would suggest a 40 gallon or 30 gallon pressure tank instead of 20 gallons subject to cost, size, and your ability to wrestle it into your car and then into your basement. The larger tank lengthens the pump cycles and thus prolongs the life of the pump, all other things being equal.

In most systems the pressure tank will be up to a third full of water during normal operation (pump turn on pressure 2/3 of pump turn off pressure e.g. 35/50 PSI). Letting more water into the tank requires a larger difference (differential?) between pump on and pump off settings in turn making more pronounced pressure changes that you may feel during your shower.

A more uniform and higher pressure which you may find handy for lawn watering requires a smaller differential between pump on and pump off settings that in turn results in more frequent pump cycles.
__________________
Stick to your lawn watering schedule until it really pours. Otherwise the storm might miss and the part that gets watered last (3 days away?) will dry up.

Last edited by AllanJ; 06-11-2015 at 09:33 AM.
AllanJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2015, 03:50 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 2,045
Rewards Points: 1,910
Default


Seems like a very reasonable price. Fiberglass tank is more expensive. Businessess have lots of expenses and you have to charge more on small jobs cause the transportation & set up costs are the same regardless of job size.

The job isn't that difficult but can be a hassle. I second the idea of going with a bigger tank. Should make your pump last longer (less cycling) with the plus of your water lasting a bit longer when the power goes out. A couple more toilet flushes can be very important.

18 psi doesn't sound right at all. Should be closer to your water pressure which is likely in the 50-60 psi range.
jogr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2015, 05:38 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Ohio
Posts: 5,698
Rewards Points: 1,942
Default


The larger your pressure tank is the less your pump well run. Just something to keep in mind. You might be good for you to increase the size of the tank.
Ghostmaker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2015, 06:01 PM   #7
Civil Engineer
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Boston
Posts: 5,832
Rewards Points: 5,246
Default


I don't see how anyone at a big box store can determine that the project will be easy for you to do. They have no idea what skills or tools your bring to the project. When I replaced my tank the last time, I had to replace the pressure gage (corroded), install a new shut off valve (leaking), and install a new well T (damaged threads). No big deal if you know how to do the work, but potentially trouble if you don't have the tools or the understanding about how to do the work.
Daniel Holzman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2015, 10:34 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 722
Rewards Points: 1,414
Default


Pricing varies a lot. Westchester plumbing likely costs more than middle-of-Maine plumbing. Plumbing in a municipality with a strict inspector costs more than one with a normal inspector. The best way to see if it's reasonable is to get a quote from a second person.

But it seems like a relatively easy job. If your municipality allows and you're not in a critical time crunch I would try to do it myself before paying someone for it.
Tom738 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
toilet tank seal replacement handy man88 Plumbing 15 04-28-2013 04:52 PM
Toilet tank replacement Jump-start Plumbing 17 04-07-2013 08:13 AM
Replacement toilet tank lid? tripower Plumbing 4 12-03-2012 11:53 AM
H2OwTo Pressurized Water Tank problems Gary5579 Plumbing 4 12-11-2011 06:25 AM
Hot Water Tank and Pressure Help tbakbradley Plumbing 2 01-17-2011 09:25 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts