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Old 01-08-2015, 12:57 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheEplumber
This is against what my gas code book says, which over rides a manufactures pipe dope can label any day. In fact, my code went as far as to say no dope or tape on the first 2-3 male threads and this was on the written test. IMO- putting pipe dope on any female thread is asking for trouble- be it NG, steam, air, water,etc. Makes it too easy to introduce it into equipment and valves
Canadian code too. Also, considering that No5, as well as many other pipe dopes, is approved for 25 different fluids, it would behoove anyone working with a particular fluid to seek out any and all applicable codes/statutes/regulations/literature. The manufacturers instructions are not the end-all/be-all when it comes to installing gas.

Last edited by hvac benny; 01-08-2015 at 01:10 AM.
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Old 01-08-2015, 08:48 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by hvac benny View Post
Yes, 5 psi MAOP is the meter, and exactly why I said if you look at your meter it will probably say that.
the meter has nothing to do with the line pressure.......... was my point, etc.

post #14, yes, i kinda corrected my statement about the psi, i even listed the two gas devices i have.....

Last edited by concrete_joe; 01-08-2015 at 08:56 AM.
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Old 01-08-2015, 09:19 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by ben's plumbing View Post
well here i go again....gasline work is not a diy project...no exceptions...no gas line is to be guessed at..proper sizing must be examined for winter load and summer load, need to know the imputs of various gas appliances that may be on line... so we can determine input ..btu ..per hour...
for small resdiential work, absolutely is DIY work..... one small firm in my area wanted $890 (two 90's and a union in there) to run ~20ft of 1"..... sorry, not happening in this universe.


a general Q, where in NFPA54 (2006) does it call out doping application?

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Originally Posted by hammerlane View Post
By developed pipe length I mean the actual length may only be 22 feet but you have to add in any 90's or Tee's as its equivalent length of pipe.
For example a 3/4" 90 is equal to 2.06 feet of straight pipe and a 3/4" Tee is equal to 4.12 feet.
yep, fittings add length to the capacity calcs and should be accounted for. 99% of the time the additional fittings used in small residential project wont make a diff, but its good to show them in the calcs, etc. if adding a T adds 4ft and that additional 4ft reduces capacity below the need of the appliance, then perhaps better to +1 the pipe size, but not because the fitting made it too low, but because capacity is already too close to being not enough. as already mentioned, better to have available capacity for future wants/needs, etc.

Last edited by concrete_joe; 01-08-2015 at 09:28 AM.
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Old 01-08-2015, 10:28 AM   #19
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so yes, NFPA54 A.5.6.7.4 says


Quote:
Joint sealing compounds should be applied so that no sealing
compound finds its way into the interior of a completed joint.
Pipe dope application should be made only to the male pipe thread of the joint and should coat all of the threads commencing one thread back from the end of the threaded pipe.

so my bad...... i am not worried about the work i did, i looked at a few items, no worries there. but next time i will use NFPA method. my gas DIY was for some backyard appliances & fireplaces.......
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Old 01-08-2015, 12:17 PM   #20
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One thing to take into consideration: Check with your local planning commission/code enforcement, etc. Around here a homeowner IS NOT allowed to alter/modify/add to/subtract from ANY natural or LP gas lines after the gas metering device--PERIOD.
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Old 01-08-2015, 12:31 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by concrete_joe View Post
so yes, NFPA54 A.5.6.7.4 says

Quote:
Joint sealing compounds should be applied so that no sealing
compound finds its way into the interior of a completed joint.
Pipe dope application should be made only to the male pipe thread of the joint and should coat all of the threads commencing one thread back from the end of the threaded pipe.
.
Damn I was looking in the NFPA 54 last night and could not find the section that dealt with that. Thanks for finding it. For what its worth, the current 2015 edition of 5.6.7.4 says,

"Thread Joint Compounds: Thread joint compounds shall be resistant to the actions of LP-gas or to any other chemical constituents of the gases to be conducted through the piping"

wonder why they changed the wording and removed the statement about Pipe dope application should be made only to the male pipe thread of the
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Old 01-08-2015, 12:36 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Thurman View Post
One thing to take into consideration: Check with your local planning commission/code enforcement, etc. Around here a homeowner IS NOT allowed to alter/modify/add to/subtract from ANY natural or LP gas lines after the gas metering device--PERIOD.
Good in theory but not gonna happen in the the real world. If you think I'm gonna hire a licensed plumber when I change my H2O tank because I need to now add an elbow you are living in a fantasy football world.
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Old 01-08-2015, 12:58 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by hammerlane View Post
Damn I was looking in the NFPA 54 last night and could not find the section that dealt with that. Thanks for finding it. For what its worth, the current 2015 edition of 5.6.7.4 says,

"Thread Joint Compounds: Thread joint compounds shall be resistant to the actions of LP-gas or to any other chemical constituents of the gases to be conducted through the piping"

wonder why they changed the wording and removed the statement about Pipe dope application should be made only to the male pipe thread of the
hmmm, thats why i had originally posted "where in NFPA", but the older copy had it. the statement you point out is the general statement for what the compound is supposed to do..... no other references in 2015 ed on how to apply the stuff?
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Old 01-08-2015, 01:10 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Thurman View Post
Around here a homeowner IS NOT allowed to alter/modify/add to/subtract from ANY natural or LP gas lines after the gas metering device--PERIOD.
I didn't realize the unions were so strong in GA

I'l grant you that piping a whole house is not something a DIY type homeowner should start with ... and of course when any substantial work is done by a DIY type homeowner it should be permitted and inspected the same as if they hired the work out to a pro ... but absolutist no exception like pronouncements let alone rules or laws don't serve the larger purpose of safety.

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Old 01-08-2015, 01:25 PM   #25
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I didn't realize the unions were so strong in GA

I'l grant you that piping a whole house is not something a DIY type homeowner should start with ... and of course when any substantial work is done by a DIY type homeowner it should be permitted and inspected the same as if they hired the work out to a pro ... but absolutist no exception like pronouncements let alone rules or laws don't serve the larger purpose of safety.
oh, we didnt talk about this part. of course, permitting and inspection required. "DIY" doesnt mean we leave out these other requirements.

my addition of +400CFH was permitted & inspected by local officials, etc. oddly though, the gas co kept my AC-250 meter saying their equipment was good enough to supply the gas requirements of existing house + the new items in backyard....... which is interesting to me, but we'll see how it goes...........
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Old 01-08-2015, 01:43 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by concrete_joe View Post
..... no other references in 2015 ed on how to apply the stuff?
I'll go thru it more later and see if I find anything
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Old 01-08-2015, 04:03 PM   #27
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ok let me correct my statement.....for all diyers who want to work on gas lines ..go right ahead.....but if Iam being ask if its a diy project..its not no exceptions....
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Old 01-08-2015, 06:28 PM   #28
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ok let me correct my statement.....for all diyers who want to work on gas lines ..go right ahead.....but if Iam being ask if its a diy project..its not no exceptions....
I have never seen or heard of an instance where a homeowner, who is not a licensed gas fitter, has accidentally caused damage to their home by working on a gas line. All the news stories you see are from contractors blowing stuff up or intentional acts by homeowners
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Old 01-08-2015, 07:24 PM   #29
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I have never seen or heard of an instance where a homeowner, who is not a licensed gas fitter, has accidentally caused damage to their home by working on a gas line.
Me either.

Maybe that's because the 80% or so who **really shouldn't be doing it** have taken the warnings to heart leaving only the 20% or so who have something resembling a clue (and access to threaders and pipe stands) to pick up the slack??
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Old 01-08-2015, 10:02 PM   #30
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Maybe that's because the 80% or so who **really shouldn't be doing it** have taken the warnings to heart leaving only the 20% or so who have something resembling a clue (and access to threaders and pipe stands) to pick up the slack??
No I think its because it is not rocket science to thread together pipe and fittings and be leak free. With all the fittings, pre-threaded nipples and sticks of pipe available on every street corner it really does not take much knowledge to join them and be leak free. Then all you do is test for leaks with a match.

Now any thoughts if I need a permit to do this?
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