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Old 11-23-2015, 02:40 PM   #1
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PEX and gas questions for laundry room


Hi All,

I have been working on converting an existing 1/F bathroom to a laundry room, including washer hookups (already done) as well as gas and venting for a gas dryer (in progress).

As always when trying to get a square idea into a round old house, challenges are encountered. I have been trying to find the best layout for the dryer hookups and settled upon the location you see in the pics below. The dryer box was more to the left of picture previously but it was not an ideal location, so I had to move it over to the right. Unfortunately the new upstairs supply PEX pipes were in the way. So now I obviously need to reroute them, but have several questions about this setup.

- The pipes do not seem long enough just by rough measurements to reroute and get to the basement at their current length, but I can try. I believe I can notch these studs up to 60% (it is a non load bearing wall) and even in worst case I can get some steel reinforcement brackets which can also act as nailing plates. However if I have to rerun new pipe anyway, is drilling preferred? Is there a way to mitigate noise for either method?

- They existing connections going into the ceiling are making me paranoid. If I replace the PEX I'll have to cut out at least one side. For some reason which only my prior plumber knows, they are utilizing one brass and one plastic elbow. I'd like to use all brass but I have learned that they are a bear to remove. I'm sure they were torqued a bit while moving the pipes around but otherwise didn't leak before. Should I just leave well enough alone or is it worth redoing all this? I just don't want any surprises later.

- On that note, any hints in general to removing the cinch clamps and fittings on previously clamped connections?

- Should I eliminate elbows where possible (like in the cellar). Barring that, I have 3/4" sharkbites that I can use if they provide more flow than a PEX elbow - it's in an unfinished basement so they won't be covered.

- Finally, I am struggling to find a good place for the dryer gas supply while trying to eliminate as much wasted space from the wall. There is a knockout for a gas line in the dryer vent box but it appears that they placed it right where the actual dryer vent would protrude. I could put it one bay over but is it worth getting one of those gas outlet boxes that come out horizontally from the wall? Seems that would not gain much space as you'd need room to attach it. I could place it slightly forward of the wall too... just not sure what's typical.

Sorry for all the questions and thanks for any advice. Happy holidays!
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PEX and gas questions for laundry room-img_20151122_135826258.jpg   PEX and gas questions for laundry room-img_20151122_135801201.jpg   PEX and gas questions for laundry room-img_20151122_135809102.jpg  
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Old 11-23-2015, 06:42 PM   #2
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I'm just bumping this for you--We can not use PEX here so my experience is limited to hydronic heating runs--
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Old 11-23-2015, 07:18 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by giansean View Post
Hi All,

- The pipes do not seem long enough just by rough measurements to reroute and get to the basement at their current length, but I can try. I believe I can notch these studs up to 60% (it is a non load bearing wall) and even in worst case I can get some steel reinforcement brackets which can also act as nailing plates. However if I have to rerun new pipe anyway, is drilling preferred? Is there a way to mitigate noise for either method?
Drilling would be preferred to notching. Drill your hole about a 1/8 larger than PEX OD to help with ticking while expanding and contracting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by giansean View Post
- They existing connections going into the ceiling are making me paranoid. If I replace the PEX I'll have to cut out at least one side. For some reason which only my prior plumber knows, they are utilizing one brass and one plastic elbow. I'd like to use all brass but I have learned that they are a bear to remove. I'm sure they were torqued a bit while moving the pipes around but otherwise didn't leak before. Should I just leave well enough alone or is it worth redoing all this? I just don't want any surprises later.

- On that note, any hints in general to removing the cinch clamps and fittings on previously clamped connections?
You can cut the cinch clamps carefully with a Dremel tool and thin cutoff wheel. If you cut into the fitting you should toss it.
[/quote]

Quote:
Originally Posted by giansean View Post

- Should I eliminate elbows where possible (like in the cellar). Barring that, I have 3/4" sharkbites that I can use if they provide more flow than a PEX elbow - it's in an unfinished basement so they won't be covered.
Shark bites will have more flow than a pex fitting. Do you need more flow?
Shark bites are $8-10 pc. pex is about $2.


Quote:
Originally Posted by giansean View Post
- Finally, I am struggling to find a good place for the dryer gas supply while trying to eliminate as much wasted space from the wall. There is a knockout for a gas line in the dryer vent box but it appears that they placed it right where the actual dryer vent would protrude. I could put it one bay over but is it worth getting one of those gas outlet boxes that come out horizontally from the wall? Seems that would not gain much space as you'd need room to attach it. I could place it slightly forward of the wall too... just not sure what's typical.

Sorry for all the questions and thanks for any advice. Happy holidays!
If you are speaking of the adjustable offset pieces, try to avoid it if possible. They resrtrict air flow considerably.
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Old 11-25-2015, 05:45 PM   #4
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Welp I took a shot at rerouting the pipes and this is the result. No leaks on either end + happy wife = winning. Hopefully the inspector will be happy too (once I finish supporting the lines and nail plating properly)

I bought a gas outlet box that will fit nicely in the little bay to the right of the cold water supply. The gas fitting that was previously in the dryer box before I moved it is right underneath, so it should work perfectly. I'll have my plumber sort it out after the hols.

Happy Thanksgiving all!
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Old 11-25-2015, 05:54 PM   #5
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Is it not correct to sleeve pex inside a long sweep ell rather than using 90 ells? Just curious when I have a future project.
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Old 11-25-2015, 06:01 PM   #6
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Is it not correct to sleeve pex inside a long sweep ell rather than using 90 ells? Just curious when I have a future project.

From my experience I would say yes, fewer connections mean fewer possibilities for leaks. Not always possible though. This theory is one of the main reasons that manifold plumbing is becoming so popular. Home-run lengths from manifold to fixture with out breaks.
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Old 11-25-2015, 06:52 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Yodaman View Post
From my experience I would say yes, fewer connections mean fewer possibilities for leaks. Not always possible though. This theory is one of the main reasons that manifold plumbing is becoming so popular. Home-run lengths from manifold to fixture with out breaks.

I should add that I have never used a sleeve to go around a corner, but have used them for block wall penetrations. Surprisingly the pex bends well with out kinking
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Old 11-25-2015, 08:08 PM   #8
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Manifolding pex is seldom used in my area- only when piping under slab and even then it's not a true manifold system.
We still pipe using trunk and branch method.
90's are avoided when possible, but we don't use any sleeving
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Old 11-25-2015, 10:32 PM   #9
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Becoming more popular here. The only problem is the time for hot to get to fixtures. But if you ran 1/2 inch to tubs and showers and 3/8 to lavs the time is drastically reduced. Seems in 3/8 inch the hot moves about 75 foot a min versus 55 foot in 1/2 inch.
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Old 11-26-2015, 06:26 AM   #10
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What I have learned is to minimize the length of 3/4 line coming off the HW tank to the manifold by keeping the manifold as close as possible. The last couple I have done the HW manifold is directly above the HW tank. In this house it takes 2.5 seconds for the the hot water to reach the faucets in the master bath above. In contrast my sons house still has 3/4 copper trunk line with 1/2 copper branches. The first faucet is 8' from the HW tank and hot takes 7 to 8 seconds to reach the faucet.
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