Natural Gas Piping Question - Plumbing - DIY Home Improvement | DIYChatroom
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Plumbing

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Display Modes
Old 07-10-2015, 02:29 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 281
Rewards Points: 322
Default

Natural gas piping question


I am looking into replacing an electric stovetop with gas, so I looked into the sizing requirements to see if the existing lines were large enough to tap into. In the attached pic, the sizing calcs suggest it would be possible to add a 1/2" lateral onto the existing system without having to dismantle too much of what is already in place. Thoughts?
Attached Thumbnails
Natural gas piping question-gas-pipes.jpg  
tns1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 07-10-2015, 03:06 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 17,158
Rewards Points: 6,652
Default


You need 3/4" from the 1.25" Main to the stove. 1/2" will not cut it.



gregzoll is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 07-10-2015, 03:33 PM   #3
Plumber
 
TheEplumber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: North Idaho
Posts: 11,429
Rewards Points: 240
Default


You're undersized at the new tee location. The branch serving the new range and WH will need to be increased. That means replacing the 1 x 1/2 x 1/2 tee
1/2" to the range appears OK
__________________
When posting in forums, letting us know your location will help others give better feedback/advice/solutions to your questions
TheEplumber is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to TheEplumber For This Useful Post:
ben's plumbing (07-12-2015)
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 07-10-2015, 04:14 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 281
Rewards Points: 322
Default


I see. The short 1/2" pipe section between the existing tee and this new tee I proposed would be undersized for the additional flow. I was hoping I would not have to remove that existing tee. Those laterals in the drawing are not simple straight sections, but snake down into the framing. Dis-assembly is not the issue, but rebuilding the laterals with rigid pipe would require punching holes in the walls.

Any techniques that might help me out here? For instance are unions allowed? Could I use the bendable gas pipe to replace some of the convoluted sections?
tns1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2015, 07:40 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 17,158
Rewards Points: 6,652
Default


You could run CSST. But you will have to make some holes. Personally I would cut a section in the wall, then get a box to put in there to allow you to place the line in the recessed opening. Then just bring the proper line up for the stove.

Because you only have 1/2", and most stoves have a high BTU gas burner now. You really need to run 3/4".



gregzoll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2015, 01:26 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 2,045
Rewards Points: 1,910
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post
Because you only have 1/2", and most stoves have a high BTU gas burner now. You really need to run 3/4".
He has a 50,000 btu stove. The 1/2 is enough for the run to the stove. The only issue is the section supplying both the stove and the WH as Eplumber said.
jogr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2015, 02:39 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 17,158
Rewards Points: 6,652
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by jogr View Post
He has a 50,000 btu stove. The 1/2 is enough for the run to the stove. The only issue is the section supplying both the stove and the WH as Eplumber said.

Not with the high output BTU burner. If they turn on other burners at the same time. It waill actually cause
issues. That is why they need to run the 3/4".



gregzoll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2015, 09:42 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 2,045
Rewards Points: 1,910
Default


A 50,000 btu stove is 50,000 btu with all burners on high. It won't ever be more than that. 1/2" will handle 50,000 btu.
jogr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2015, 10:41 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 17,158
Rewards Points: 6,652
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by jogr View Post
A 50,000 btu stove is 50,000 btu with all burners on high. It won't ever be more than that. 1/2" will handle 50,000 btu.
Actually not. We have a stove with a high BTU burner. When you turn on the other four, it actually causes them to go down in flame height, because of the other burner.

3/4" comes off of the 1" for my Water Heater & Stove. I have a run of 1" that is just for the furnace. It was done that way originally, because when we moved into the house, there was still an Octopus Furnace down there.

There really is not much cost difference between 1/2 & 3/4. Personally I would have the OP go with the 3/4", so that later on down the road, they do not come back wondering why the appliance is fuel starved.



gregzoll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2015, 07:10 AM   #10
An old Tradesmen
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Somewhere
Posts: 38,841
Rewards Points: 9,408
Default


If the OPs stove is fuel starved when using the largest burner with any other burners, then there is a problem with the gas supply to the house. 20' of 1/2" black pipe will flow 75,000 BTUs an hour. The OP listed his stove as a 50,000 BTU. He has 20% safety with a 1/2" line and the few fittings he will need.

As pointed out earlier, the tee needs to be increased in size for the water heater and stove line.
__________________
When posting in certain forums, knowing your location will help others give better feedback/advice/solutions to your questions.
beenthere is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2015, 07:51 AM   #11
Property Mgt/Maint
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 6,478
Rewards Points: 8,202
Default


since you need to break into the main line, it may be easier to the leave the T-for the water heater intact and find another location on the main line to T off for he new stove, just a thought
__________________
[political signature removed]
Yodaman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2015, 07:57 AM   #12
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: PA
Posts: 5,918
Rewards Points: 582
Default


if it were mine I would change it ti this....
Attached Thumbnails
Natural gas piping question-004.jpg  
ben's plumbing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2015, 10:05 AM   #13
Property Mgt/Maint
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 6,478
Rewards Points: 8,202
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by ben's plumbing View Post
if it were mine I would change it ti this....

Ben, could not agree more if doable with out remodeling the house. Fewer lineal feet, fewer connections, = few possibilities for leaks!
__________________
[political signature removed]
Yodaman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2015, 10:33 AM   #14
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 738
Rewards Points: 500
Default


It looks like OP is using multiple code zones to size his lines (70, 80, 90 and 100 feet). At least that's what the notes under the measurements appear to be to me as someone who uses a different code. Without knowing the actual lengths from point of delivery, as well as the actual delivery pressure, only assumptions can be made.
hvac benny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2017, 11:46 PM   #15
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 281
Rewards Points: 322
Default

Re: Natural gas piping question


I realize I hadn't finalized this old thread. I ended up changing out the 1" x 1/2" x 1/2" tee to 1" x 3/4" x 1/2", and ran 3/4" all the way to the new stove. A bit tricky disassembling and reassembling those laterals in the walls and attic, but it all worked out. No fireballs.
tns1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Is Natural Gas Firepit on a Wood or Composite Deck unsafe? Jakobud General DIY Discussions 4 03-29-2012 03:43 PM
Generator connection Question - Final Plan Apollo67 Electrical 24 01-30-2012 07:44 PM
DIY LP piping question cgschlangen Plumbing 4 11-03-2011 10:22 PM
natural gas install to existing house sagechickie Building & Construction 9 04-22-2009 09:44 PM
Basement Renovation Question KUIPORNG Remodeling 234 08-26-2008 08:19 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts