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Old 03-12-2015, 03:29 AM   #1
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In-line water pressure reducer


Our house is built on a concrete slab. I discovered that the main water line to our house connects to the cold water line for our laundry tray before the line comes out of the slab and up out of the ground for the house pressure reducing valve.

So the water pressure for the whole house is 60 psi but the water pressure for the cold water line at the laundry tray is at the city's water pressure. The net effect is that the cold water line to our washing machine is at the city's water pressure.

Via Googling, I learned that there are in-line water pressure reducers. Like this Valterra (A01-1122VP) Lead-Free Water Regulator on amazon for instance:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...=ATVPDKIKX0DER

Is this a good in-line water pressure regulator? Is there a better one that is compact like this one? Cost is no object. I just want one that will never leak.

The pressure reducer will be screwed on to the hose bib connection on the cold water line that goes to the cold water faucet for the laundry tray. Then the washing machine hose will be screwed on to the pressure reducer.

-----------------------------------------

copper pipe to laundry tray ===TT===(cold water faucet for laundry tray)

-----------------------------------------

The TT is the hose bib connection for the washing machine hose.

Thanks,
HRG

Last edited by Homerepairguy; 03-12-2015 at 03:38 AM.
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Old 03-12-2015, 07:47 AM   #2
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Verify water pressure at the laundry hose bib. If under 80 psi., i wouldnt even worry about it. Just a suggestion.

I dont know about that rv regulator. Couldnt find stats on it. Looks like it would work.

Others will be along with more suggestions.
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Old 03-12-2015, 02:36 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmon View Post
Verify water pressure at the laundry hose bib. If under 80 psi., i wouldnt even worry about it. Just a suggestion.

I dont know about that rv regulator. Couldnt find stats on it. Looks like it would work.

Others will be along with more suggestions.
Just measured the water pressure at the laundry hose bib. It is 105 psi. Water pressure for the rest of the house is 60 psi.

Thanks,
HRG
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Old 03-12-2015, 02:50 PM   #4
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Your welcome.

Wow! I agree with you, get a water pressure reducer on there.

Only problem I see with the one you posted is it's after the hose bib which would be definitely good for the washing machine. But you still have 105 psi on the hose bib fitting itself. Shouldn't really matter that much it's not as delicate as the washing machine inlets. Just my opinion.
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Old 03-12-2015, 06:11 PM   #5
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would like to see a picture of how this is set up...
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Old 03-12-2015, 08:29 PM   #6
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A good way to set up a pressure reducing valve is to have:
1. a ball valve
2. the pressure reducing valve,
3. a tee for a pressure gauge immediately downstream of the PRV, and
4. then another ball valve immediately downstream of the tee for the pressure gauge.

That way, if you're ever wondering what pressure your pressure reducing valve is maintaining, you can just close the ball valve and read the pressure off the pressure gauge.

Pressure reducing valves will typically have a filtration screen on them that filters the incoming water. When people think the pressure is low, they immediately start monkeying with the screw adjustment on the PRV, only to find out later that the problem was a clogged filtration screen. Having a ball valve on each side of the PRV makes it easy to check and clean the filtration screen.

I have that set up on the pressure reducing valve for my hot water heating system.

You should also be aware that Watts used to make overhaul kits available for their pressure reducing valve so that you can replace the wearing parts in them yourself. Instead of buying whatever's available, I'd check to see if Watts still makes those overhaul kits available, and if so, buy a Watts PRV so that you can repair that valve yourself.
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Last edited by Nestor_Kelebay; 03-12-2015 at 08:55 PM.
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Old 03-13-2015, 12:07 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ben's plumbing View Post
would like to see a picture of how this is set up...
This is a picture of the faucet assembly for our laundry tub.
The inline water pressure regulator like the one I linked to in my first post will be inserted in the cold water line to the washing machine. Was wondering if there's a better regulator before I place my order.
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Old 03-13-2015, 12:09 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nestor_Kelebay View Post
A good way to set up a pressure reducing valve is to have:
1. a ball valve
2. the pressure reducing valve,
3. a tee for a pressure gauge immediately downstream of the PRV, and
4. then another ball valve immediately downstream of the tee for the pressure gauge.

That way, if you're ever wondering what pressure your pressure reducing valve is maintaining, you can just close the ball valve and read the pressure off the pressure gauge.

Pressure reducing valves will typically have a filtration screen on them that filters the incoming water. When people think the pressure is low, they immediately start monkeying with the screw adjustment on the PRV, only to find out later that the problem was a clogged filtration screen. Having a ball valve on each side of the PRV makes it easy to check and clean the filtration screen.

I have that set up on the pressure reducing valve for my hot water heating system.

You should also be aware that Watts used to make overhaul kits available for their pressure reducing valve so that you can replace the wearing parts in them yourself. Instead of buying whatever's available, I'd check to see if Watts still makes those overhaul kits available, and if so, buy a Watts PRV so that you can repair that valve yourself.
Thank you for your suggestions. The regulator I need for our washing machine needs to be very compact and simple, like the one I linked to in my first post.

Thanks,
HRG
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Old 03-13-2015, 01:00 AM   #9
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You do understand that the pressure regulator that is available from Amazon is for an RV, don't you? I have an RV and use one similar to that one and it may work for what you are trying to do. The photo you posted of your laundry tub and washing machine hose connections brings up another question: It appears that the hoses to your washing machine are coming directly off of the lines to your laundry tub faucets. IF this is the case then you would have the same 105 psi water at your cold water faucet as you have going to your cold water line to the washing machine. As mentioned in post #4 you should have the 105 psi within the cold water line going to the laundry tub. You may be better off putting a PRV in the incoming line to the home.
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Old 03-13-2015, 02:30 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thurman View Post
You do understand that the pressure regulator that is available from Amazon is for an RV, don't you?
Yes. I need the garden hose type connections for a pressure regulator to the washing machine and the RV type has that.
Quote:
I have an RV and use one similar to that one and it may work for what you are trying to do. The photo you posted of your laundry tub and washing machine hose connections brings up another question: It appears that the hoses to your washing machine are coming directly off of the lines to your laundry tub faucets. IF this is the case then you would have the same 105 psi water at your cold water faucet as you have going to your cold water line to the washing machine. As mentioned in post #4 you should have the 105 psi within the cold water line going to the laundry tub. You may be better off putting a PRV in the incoming line to the home.
Please re-read my first post. I already have a PRV for our house. It's just that the line to this laundry tub comes "before" the PRV due to incorrect plumbing in the concrete slab. I'm not concerned about the water pressure to the laundry tub's faucet. Only to the washing machine.
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Old 03-13-2015, 07:08 PM   #11
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Give it a shot. Either it works or it fails. As a plumber I would advise you to retie your water connections after your existing PRV valve for the house.
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Old 03-13-2015, 08:03 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghostmaker View Post
Give it a shot. Either it works or it fails.
I believe that the RV pressure regulator that I linked to in my first post will work fine for the washing machine. Just wanted to see if someone here had experience with a better one before I placed my order.

Quote:
As a plumber I would advise you to retie your water connections after your existing PRV valve for the house.
Could you please clarify what "retie" means?

Thanks,
HRG
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Old 03-13-2015, 10:11 PM   #13
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Retie means re-pipe it correctly.
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Old 03-13-2015, 10:29 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghostmaker View Post
Retie means re-pipe it correctly.
That would require busting the concrete slab to find the error. Too much work for me . I'll just go with a pressure regulator dedicated to the washing machine .

Thanks though,
HRG
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Old 03-14-2015, 10:16 AM   #15
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I think he meant to rework the supply lines above the slab to incorporate an appropriate prv (not one designed for an rv) before they terminate at the sink. That way the pressure is reduced at the sink and reduced for the washer.
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