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Old 08-10-2014, 03:23 AM   #1
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Length of water line for the in fridge ice and water


Is there a code restriction on how long/high the run can be?

We might have to have the fridge on the other wall and would still like the ice maker. Can we run a hard water line around the room stub at the wall then run the skinny tube to the fridge? The walls are open so doing this is not a problem I am just not sure what the limits are. I can't run this in the floor as I have concrete made of Kryptonite. It is not on an exterior wall either so that option is out as well.

Not the end of the world if the answer is no but hoping its yes.

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Old 08-10-2014, 04:54 AM   #2
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I don't know of a code that limits the length of a water line---I believe you are fine--a plumber will be along soon--Mike--
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Old 08-10-2014, 06:22 AM   #3
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If you are in the wall, run pipe not the plastic or braided tubing used for ice maker kits. Flex copper or PEX pipe would be the easiest. Install a stop valve at the frig.
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Old 08-10-2014, 09:08 AM   #4
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If you decide to hard pipe the water line to the shut off valve, use plastic from the valve to the fridge with enough length to move the fridge for cleaning.
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Old 08-10-2014, 09:14 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gmaint View Post
If you decide to hard pipe the water line to the shut off valve, use plastic from the valve to the fridge with enough length to move the fridge for cleaning.
Have to disagree. I have seen too many leaks from those plastic lines. Use a SS braided connector or 1/4" flex copper coil.
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Old 08-10-2014, 09:36 AM   #6
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And what's inside the braided stainless? A rubber or plastic hose.

Run 1/4" pex the full distance with no inner wall connections.
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Old 08-10-2014, 10:23 AM   #7
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Half inch in the wall hard piped well secured with stud guards valve box at the fridge with a arrestor, from the box to the fridge copper coil or SS line, your choice, would not go any smaller than 1/2 pipe in the wall
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Old 08-10-2014, 10:31 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Javiles View Post
Half inch in the wall hard piped well secured with stud guards valve box at the fridge with a arrestor, from the box to the fridge copper coil or SS line, your choice, would not go any smaller than 1/2 pipe in the wall
Good grief, we're not trying to water the lawn. 1/4" ID will do anything a fridge needs.
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Old 08-10-2014, 11:07 AM   #9
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Sometimes it's easier to run the line straight down through the cabinet base and under the floor, and pop back up in the corner behind the fridge. That way if you have a leak, you can reach the valve without pulling the fridge out.

Another vote for 1/4" copper tubing (50ft rolls)
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Old 08-10-2014, 11:20 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan View Post
Sometimes it's easier to run the line straight down through the cabinet base and under the floor, and pop back up in the corner behind the fridge. That way if you have a leak, you can reach the valve without pulling the fridge out.

Another vote for 1/4" copper tubing (50ft rolls)
Concrete slab.
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Old 08-10-2014, 01:20 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rjniles View Post
Concrete slab.
Missed that somehow. :D :D Still vote for 1/4" CU tube.

Is the house water plumbed overhead?

If so it may be easier to cut in a tee and drop down the wall behind where the frigde is and install an icemaker box.
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Old 08-10-2014, 04:14 PM   #12
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Thank you all.

I guess I could have been a little clearer in my terms. By hard pipe, my intention was to use copper in the walls and then as suggested stub out to the wall and then switch to the smaller tubing etc to the fridge.

One of the suggestions on piping that intrigued me was the ceiling reference.

Although our water is under the slab if I can run the pipe up the wall from the sink and then across the ceiling in the attic and then down its 4 less bends and shorter by about 10 feet to get it to the fridge. (when I say bends I mean a soft radius turn and not an elbow connection) Live in south MS so don't have hard freezes that often but would definitely insulate and protect the run across the attic. Is this permissible? if so is there a requirement for securing the line as it runs along a joist? Can it be strapped every couple of feet? The way it is up there, I would not have to drill through any joists just the top plate down to the fridge as the run would be parallel to the joints. The fridge would be directly across from the sink.

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Old 08-10-2014, 04:19 PM   #13
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Where I am at, there is no requirement for "Securing" the piping. Only supporting it, and there is no requirement as to how it must be supported.

Every 6 feet on 1/2" copper pipe is sufficient for support.



Edit : You probably will want to secure it so that when the solenoid shuts off the pipe doesn't vibrate in the ceiling.
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Old 08-10-2014, 04:30 PM   #14
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You don't insulate the tubing from the heat loss of the room. The tubing is run under the attic insulation and next to the drywall so as to benefit from the room heat loss. A common misunderstanding of builders and contractors.

Run pex and forget about freezing.
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Old 08-10-2014, 04:41 PM   #15
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For 10' of pipe and fittings- I'd still go in the walls. But thats me, I never want to put pipe in any outside wall/ceiling.
While were at it , I vote for 1/2" pipe with a 1/4" stop, inside a flush mounted ice maker box
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