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Old 03-14-2015, 10:38 PM   #1
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Kitchen Sink Drain Sewer Line repair


I am replacing the Cast Iron pipe behind the wall. The threads of the 1 1/2 inch connecting pipe gave out. I am planning on cutting this Y section out with an angle grinder on the bottom. The top has a copper vent pipe. I will cut with hacksaw.

I'm planning on replacing with plastic pipe. I think I can make it fit. The Cast Iron had a 8 inch distance, between the two drain connections. The plastic is about a 10 inch spread, so this is going to be a tight fit.

Do you have any guidance or suggestions before I start this repair. Is this a good design? Can I cut Cast Iron with an angle grinder? Thanks for your help

The Cast Iron pipe flares out on each end. The plastic doesn't, so maybe the extra two inches will compensate for that.
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Old 03-14-2015, 11:04 PM   #2
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Why not make the sheet rock hole bigger?
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Old 03-15-2015, 08:31 AM   #3
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Why is there even a Y there?
A double sink can be drained with one line if that's what's there for.
A grinder will be throwing red hot sparks everywhere behind that wall on the old dried out
vapor barrier.
A chain cutter would make no sparks.
That Fernco in the bottom of the picture needs to be one made for cast iron on one end and ABS on the other, there two different sizes.
Your also missing a short piece of ABS and a drain adaptor so you can connect up the drain.
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Old 03-15-2015, 09:50 AM   #4
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I'd cut and chisel the old steel threads out of the existing tapped fitting before attmpting what you're proposing.
If that doesn't work, use the properfiiting such as a fixtue cross.
Or as Joe suggested, use a standard san tee. Then a wye under the cabinet. This would be a much shorter fitting make up.
For cutting, try a saw-zall
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Old 03-15-2015, 10:50 AM   #5
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In order to cut that cast iron with an angle grinder you need a wheel that the radius would be greater than the diameter of the CI pipe itself. Then you have to compensate for wheel wear. These wheel come on 4" or 6" diameters. A 4" would not be enough, even with changing wheels. A 6" would be very difficult to handle in this tight space. And as Joe stated you would have the sparks=fire hazard. I realize that this is a difficult space to work in but renting a small CI pipe cutter is the answer. And again--why is the wye there?
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Old 03-15-2015, 11:21 PM   #6
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Thanks for the helpful advice.

I thought cleaning the threads up was the way to go. I first tried to snake the pipe. But, this wasn't going to happen so I cut the fitting off, and discovered that I had about 1/2 hole for drainage. In fact the pipe was hard packed about 1 1/2 foot down until I reached the clean out on the exterior wall. (Everything below that is perfect, because I snake and flush that clean-out every year.)

I have some additional questions and would appreciate your input.

1. The house was built in 1964, so maybe that is why they used a Y in the wall. I figured I should replace with the same. However, I'm perfectly happy to replace with San-Tee or Fixtue cross. Is there any benefit with either one?

2. Because of the amount of crud built up in the pipe. Should I install a second clean-out San-Tee above or below the San-Tee for the sink drains? (I think the crud I chiseled out was built up over 50 years, so maybe installing a second San-Tee for a clean-out under the sink is overkill ?)

3. I have the drain adapter. I think I can figure out how to tie the two line together. Any pointers would be appreciated.

Thanks again for all the help.
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Old 03-16-2015, 08:35 AM   #7
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1. San tee is pretty standard. Once stubbed out into the cabinet you can connect the 2 bowls

2. A clean out tee is required on sinks. I put them under the san tee.

3 A continuous waste kit works good. Or a horizontal double wye with a trap at each bowl and the center inlet will serve as a clean out
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Old 03-16-2015, 05:27 PM   #8
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With that amount of blockage on that drain I would cut all of it out until you get to larger pipe.
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Old 03-16-2015, 07:43 PM   #9
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yep its time to replace it all.....i wouldn't think of hooking back into that mess
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Old 03-17-2015, 12:39 AM   #10
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That would be a huge project to remove that pipe. Brick wall on exterior and crawl space underneath. I cleaned the pipe out with a chisel and a 2 foot crowbar. I pretty sure I've also cleaned the slight curve at the bottom where it meets the clean out pipe. Photo included. Should I still remove the pipe?

It would be nice if there was a 2" wire brush adapter that I could feed down that pipe using my drill. It would need to be in 1' sections. That would clean that pipe up.

Also, I think I now understand the double wye in the wall. Both sinks had there own p-trap (one sink has garbage disposal) so I guess the in wall double wye would vent both lines to the p-trap.

Thank for all the great in-put.
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Old 03-17-2015, 07:22 AM   #11
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well you did get it cleaned...but where did all the junk go ..down the drain ? if it did you may now have a clog..
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Old 03-17-2015, 01:03 PM   #12
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There is a clean-out at the bottom, about 17 inches down. As I knocked the crud out, I used a big Crowbar to slide in the (clean out) turn and pull that junk out with the bent end. It was also dry when I did it.

Everything starting at the clean out and down is clean and smooth pipe.

Should I run a wire wheel down this pipe to clean the rough surface off? Is that necessary?
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Old 03-17-2015, 06:01 PM   #13
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This is the time to go rent a snake and snake it with a electric eel. Use the largest adaptor that fits and run water down with a hose.

Check the drain out with a garden hose on full blast it should take all that water without a back up.

Start using Bioclean religiously for now on.

Last edited by Ghostmaker; 03-17-2015 at 06:04 PM.
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