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Old 08-20-2015, 10:09 AM   #1
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Which kind of pipe...What size?


I will be building a tractor storage barn & workshop combination on my property. I would like to bring over from the house to the barn an underground water line so I can hook up a wash sink & a connection to the veggie garden.

I will be digging a trench to burry the pipe run from the house to the barn, which will be about 75 feet (more or less) & I'm not sure what to use for the underground pipe run or the diameter of the pipe. I think I would like to use that water pipe that, is a heavy black plastic that comes rolled up & you use plastic fittings & stainless steel clamps. The main supply line on my house is 3/4" PVC that I can connect to. Or I can also connect to the outside hose sill cock on the side of my house. That would also shorten the run to the barn by about twenty five feet.

At the barn I want to install a four foot hydrant water fixture to connect a garden hose. On the inside of the barn, I want to have a wash sink. The buried line will be about eight inches deep. We really do not have a frost line here in upstate South Carolina, so I don't have to be concerned with water line freeze, however I would like to be able to open up the underground pipe & Blow out the line when not in use during winter just as a safety measure. Can someone help me with the materials needed and the pipe size for my project. Thank you.
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Old 08-20-2015, 10:30 AM   #2
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Sounds like the black pipe you're describing is sprinkler pipe. No on that. Depending what is code for your area, you can run PVC, Pex or copper.
What is your water pressure at the house?
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Old 08-20-2015, 11:01 AM   #3
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The water pressure off the main supply is around 60 psi, but I will be checking it with a gauge to be sure. I'm here in South Carolina. But when I lived in NY, orange county, I do recall we had the coiled black pipe underground, five feet down, from the top of the well head, connection into the pressure tank in the basement of the house. The house was built by me 25 years ago & at that time that black coiled pipe was legal by code.

Here in SC, I don't think it will be an issue, but I would like to use the proper material. PVC 3/4" is what the plumber installed at my new house here in SC, from the meter into the crawlspace. The house lines for sinks, toilets, etc. are 1/2" lines.
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Old 08-20-2015, 04:21 PM   #4
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Make sure you find out your frost level so your ditch is deep enough. I would suggest pex because it is a house approved water line. Well pipe is usually only good to the pump/tank then they convert to a water line pipe. Your house piping is CPVC Biege in color not PVC white in color. Pvc is not approved for hot water .
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Old 08-20-2015, 05:05 PM   #5
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Here but not all places that black pipe in the roll is poly and is approved for rural water lines both mains and subs. With a good loamy soil or some imported sand I would not hesitate to use for a run to the barn.
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Old 08-20-2015, 05:08 PM   #6
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Pex is good.

The black pipe you speak of is called "poly" pipe. We install it on all domestic water services. It is available in copper tube size or iron pipe size- 160# or 200# is approved in our area. Do not use the lighter irrigation gauge though- I think it's 100#
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Old 08-20-2015, 05:41 PM   #7
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I did a similar job last fall, ran 100 ft of 3/4 pex out to a garage for seasonal usage.
In this case we dug down 30", back filled with 6" of sand, laid in the tube and covered with another 6" of sand. Dropped in a tracer wire and filled to within 6" of the surface and then added "Caution" plastic tape. The sand might be overkill but it keeps possible sharp rocks away from the tubing.
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Old 08-20-2015, 05:48 PM   #8
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The black pipe is high density polyethylene (HDPE), available in long lengths and virtually any diameter. This type of pipe is routinely used for underground service, of course check with your local plumbing inspector to be sure it is OK. DO NOT confuse this type of pipe with PEX, which is cross linked polyethylene, and is typically not approved for underground use.
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Old 08-20-2015, 06:31 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman View Post
The black pipe is high density polyethylene (HDPE), available in long lengths and virtually any diameter. This type of pipe is routinely used for underground service, of course check with your local plumbing inspector to be sure it is OK. DO NOT confuse this type of pipe with PEX, which is cross linked polyethylene, and is typically not approved for underground use.
Pex is approved for underground use under the IPC.

WATER SERVICE PIPE
MATERIAL
STANDARD
Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastic pipe
ASTM D 1527; ASTM D 2282
Asbestos-cement pipe
ASTM C 296
Brass pipe
ASTM B 43
Chlorinated polyvinyl chloride (CPVC) plastic pipe
ASTM D 2846; ASTM F 441; ASTM F 442; CSA B 137.6
Copper or copper-alloy pipe
ASTM B 42; ASTM B 302
Copper or copper-alloy tubing (Type K, WK, L, WL, M or WM)
ASTM B 75; ASTM B 88; ASTM B 251; ASTM B 447
Cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) plastic tubing
ASTM F 876; ASTM F 877; CSA B 137.5
Cross-linked polyethylene/aluminum/cross-linked polyethylene (PEX-AL-PEX) pipe
ASTM F 1281; ASTM F 2262; CAN/CSA B 137.10 M
Cross-linked polyethylene/aluminum/high-density polyethylene (PEX-AL-HDPE)
ASTM F 1986
Ductile iron water pipe
AWWA C151; AWWA C115
Galvanized steel pipe
ASTM A 53
Polyethylene (PE) plastic pipe
ASTM D 2239; ASTM D 3035; CSA B 137.1
Polyethylene (PE) plastic tubing
ASTM D 2737; CSA B 137.1
Polyethylene/aluminum/polethylene (PE-AL-PE) pipe
ASTM F 1282; CAN/CSA B 137.9
Polypropylene (PP) plastic pipe or tubing
ASTM F 2389; CSA B 137.11
Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic pipe
ASTM D 1785; ASTM D 2241; ASTM D 2672; CSA B 137.3
Stainless steel pipe (Type 304/304L)
ASTM A 312; ASTM A 778
Stainless steel pipe (Type 316/316L)
ASTM A 312; ASTM A 778

WATER DISTRIBUTION PIPE
MATERIAL
STANDARD
Brass pipe
ASTM B 43
Chlorinated polyvinyl chloride (CPVC) plastic pipe and tubing
ASTM D 2846; ASTM F 441; ASTM F 442; CSA B 137.6
Copper or copper-alloy pipe
ASTM B 42; ASTM B 302
Copper or copper-alloy tubing (Type K, WK, L, WL, M or WM)
ASTM B 75; ASTM B 88; ASTM B 251; ASTM B 447
Cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) plastic tubing
ASTM F 876; ASTM F 877; CSA B 137.5
Cross-linked polyethylene/aluminum/cross-linked polyethylene (PEX-AL-PEX) pipe
ASTM F 1281; ASTM F 2262; CAN/CSA B 137.10 M
Cross-linked polyethylene/aluminum/high-density polyethylene (PEX-AL-HDPE)
ASTM F 1986
Ductile iron pipe
AWWA C151/A 21.51; AWWA C115/A 21.15
Galvanized steel pipe
ASTM A 53
Polyethylene/aluminum/polyethylene (PE-AL-PE) composite pipe
ASTM F 1282
Polypropylene (PP) plastic pipe or tubing
ASTM F 2389; CSA B 137.11
Stainless steel pipe (Type 304/304L)
ASTM A 312; ASTM A 778
Stainless steel pipe (Type 316/316L)
ASTM A 312; ASTM A 778



http://plasticpipe.org/pdf/pex_desig...ter_supply.pdf

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Last edited by Ghostmaker; 08-20-2015 at 06:35 PM.
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Old 08-20-2015, 06:40 PM   #10
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Ghost, you beat me to it, just getting ready to site 2015 IPC 605.3 Water Service Pipe code.

http://codes.iccsafe.org/app/book/co...apter%206.html
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Old 08-21-2015, 07:30 AM   #11
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IPC and local codes do vary. Local code prevails.
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Old 08-21-2015, 09:41 AM   #12
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Thank you everyone. Now that I have got the advice on the pipe material, what size pipe do I run from the house to the new construction barn. I assume 3/4" I.D. will work to go out as the main supply, then if I add a slop sink I will reduce down to 1/2"

Is the 3/4" ok for a main run of 50-75 feet. My water use at the new barn will not be much at all. Just a sink & a hose connection to a vegetable garden. Thanks.
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Old 08-21-2015, 11:59 AM   #13
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3/4 is plenty big enough. Some will try to convince you that 1/2 is big enough, and it is, but the cost differential between 1/2 and 3/4 for the total project is so little, that it makes no sense not to run 3/4
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Old 08-21-2015, 12:16 PM   #14
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Where do you plan on discharging the slop sink?
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Old 08-21-2015, 12:42 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yodaman View Post
3/4 is plenty big enough. Some will try to convince you that 1/2 is big enough, and it is, but the cost differential between 1/2 and 3/4 for the total project is so little, that it makes no sense not to run 3/4
Thanks. I thin I will be running the 3/4" pipe. Cost is not the issue with me. It's finding the best size to use. Thanks
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