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Old 01-10-2016, 06:06 PM   #1
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How to remove shower pan?


So I need to find out why my 8 year old master shower is leaking. I have determined that it is not coming from the top shower head. Since the leaks are in the corners of the shower pan, I am assuming it is either faulty sealing of the corners of the tiles inside OR the shower drain. Either way, I need to lift up the shower pan and remove it to determine where the leak is happening.

I have removed the shower enclose and will be removing the first row of tiles so that I can lift the shower pan off. Here are a few questions I need answered before proceeding in lifting the shower pan.

1. What kind of connector is in the drain hole? How do I remove this and is it necessary to remove before attempting to lift the shower pan? Last thing I want to do is create more issues by damaging plumbing pipes by lifting the pan up. So I need to know how to properly remove or undo any piping connecting the drain.

2. Looks like the shower pan has a lip of some kind on the ends and one of the wall boards looks to be over-top of it. What is the best way to go about remove that so that the shower pan will lift up?

3. Do I need to turn off any water valves when lifting the shower pan? I don't see why I would.

and finally...

4. Any other helpful tips before I DIY this project?

Thanks in advanced for any help!
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Old 01-10-2016, 06:41 PM   #2
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You can't lift it out without removing the bottom course of tiles.

Leak is 95% likely to be coming from the tiles and not the drain. Start there.
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Old 01-10-2016, 06:50 PM   #3
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Yes, I will be removing the bottom tiles first...but mold has formed under the shower pan and I will need to remove to repair mold. So I need to know the proper way to remove this shower pan.
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Old 01-10-2016, 08:18 PM   #4
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That's a glued drain to remove the pan you will need to cut the drain from below.
It looks like someone put tile over drywall and that would be the place to start. It doesn't look like green board. Water resistant drywall.
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Old 01-10-2016, 09:08 PM   #5
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How in the world am I to cut it off from below? Wouldn't I have to lift it up to get below it? Can't there be away to twist it off somehow?

That is not drywall. It's cement board.
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Old 01-10-2016, 09:59 PM   #6
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I would suggest you open the walls up first or file a homeowners insurance claim for water damage. It should be covered.
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Old 01-11-2016, 05:44 AM   #7
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This has been a slow a leak for several years that I have just recently discovered. Since mold has formed, my insurance will not cover. They will only cover sudden plumbing bursts or leaks not leaks that have been an on going issue that caused mold.

I was however able to remove the top part of drain by unscrewing it. Juatbnot sure if that's enough before attempting to lift pan.
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Old 01-11-2016, 07:31 AM   #8
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If that pan was installed correctly the tile board runs over the flanges.
Until the tile board is removed or at least cut out the pans not coming out.
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Old 01-11-2016, 08:11 AM   #9
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The tiles will be removed. My question is how is the drain attached to the plumbing and what do I need to be aware of when lifting the shower pan from the drain.
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Old 01-11-2016, 11:17 AM   #10
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Agree with those previous. I doubt the drain is leaking, so leave pan in place. From the looks of it the tiles are letting the water through. I have seen where people have used mastic instead of thinset for showers. It absorbs water and becomes a gooey mess. Remove the tiles and see what happened. If a mastic was used, you will see and smell it. Replace all the sheetrock with either green board or hardi backer or similar, seal if you want to be sure (Redgard) and re-tile.

Your leaks are above the pan, so again, don't create more work for yourself.
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Old 01-11-2016, 12:09 PM   #11
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Well, I wish I did not have to remove the shower pan but look at these pics before. See where the leaks are? Wouldn't the leaks extend to under the pan as well which would require lifting the pan?






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Old 01-11-2016, 12:16 PM   #12
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Please put your location in your profile.

In the last few years, I acquired a home with a shower in the bsmt which I needed to move. I believe that pan just pushed into a fitting with a rubber gasket. I remember turning it and turning it and finally deciding it wasn't threaded, so I just pulled up on it, but it took some force.

I would try to identify what type of pan you are dealing with. Maybe there is a name on it somewhere? Then google them and even go to a store where they are sold and look at your same model there in the store. Get the installation instructions and this will help you identify where the leak is coming from.

We don't know what type of floor this is installed on. Is is a first or second floor framed floor or a concrete slab or bsmt floor?

You can do some research on how to tile around a shower pan. Generally the type of pan you have is one piece except the drain assembly, so it won't leak. It will have a curb and a flange on top of the curb which goes out, then back up. The tilebacker should come down to the flange/extend on past the flange to the curb. There is some controversy about how to do this, because if the tilebacker is installed past the flange, it will flare out if the walls aren't shimmed out.

The tilebacker has to be waterproof, or water will flow through it and down. Sheetrock is not a suitable tilebacker. The way the walls work is that water goes through the tile and grout lines, much like rain will go through your siding and siding joints on the exterior of your home. The water then hits the waterproof surface, and flows down the walls, over the flange, and comes back out and goes down the drain.

Obviously most of the water hitting the wall simply flows down the tile surface, but some will get behind it.

Another good practice with any shower is to squeegee the walls and floor when you are done showering, and to make sure the room is well ventilated.
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Old 01-11-2016, 12:23 PM   #13
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Now I see your photos.

Is that a concrete floor? What is to the left, a door or something?

The only thing I can see from the photos is that you have a wet spot on the left. It could be because the water is leaking out the shower door above the wet spot. It could be because the water is leaking on the right and flowing to a low spot on the left.

It could also be because someone is showering and getting out and dripping all over the floor and the water is flowing to a low spot there on the left.

I think Mustee is the brand of shower pan I worked with in the past.
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Old 01-11-2016, 12:47 PM   #14
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Pictures help, and gives a little different idea for me now. To prove out the pan, versus something else, find a way to deliver a lot of water to the drain, without hitting the tile or any part of the curbs of the pan. A hose, buckets of water. See if water is then getting to where you are seeing wet spot. If not, through tile likely, if so, a problem at pan drain.
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Old 01-11-2016, 01:47 PM   #15
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Well, weeks ago what I did was pull up the sub flooring which is a hardy board and sprayed the mold area on the OSB flooring with a mold killer. Then I replaced the hardy board and sealed the outside area of the frame and shower pan. Also replaced the little flap that was deteriorated under the shower door (thought that might have been it). Resumed showering as usual and notice the leak happening again coming in under the hardy board. So it is coming from either behind the lower tiles or drain. I did cut a hole in the wall behind the shower head to verify that the leak is not coming from the shower head or midway up. It is definitely coming from the bottom area. Also, this is on the second floor above garage. The ceiling in the garage is showing mold. That is a pocket door to the side of the shower. The flooring is wood...no slab.
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