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Old 08-21-2017, 10:30 AM   #16
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Re: Getting a dribble out of spigot


PS
I have one of those Chinese inspection cameras. I think I paid about $16, actually works pretty good. It would let you make small holes which would be easy repair.
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Old 08-21-2017, 04:59 PM   #17
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Re: Getting a dribble out of spigot


Been thinking about your situation and have a suggestion.

If you are convinced that there is no stop valve on that line,

1. Turn off the water to the house.
2. Cut the vertical line (the line coming up) about 2 or 3" below the elbow. You can easily do that with a mini tubing cutter. You want to leave enough pipe coming out of the elbow to reconnect with Sharkbite coupling.

3. Have someone turn the water to the house back on, but only a little bit, you don't want a flood.

4. If you get water out of the pipe coming up then you are correct, there is not stop valve and the frost free hose bib is blocked. If you don't get water, then I am correct and there is a stop valve. You will have to find it.

5. If you are correct and the hose bib is stopped, connect a garden hose to the another faucet. Connect one of your washing machine supply hoses to the garden hose. The washing machine hose has two female ends. Connect the other end of the washing machine hose to this hose bib. Find some rubber or plastic tubing and clamp on to the end of the pipe coming out of the hose bib..

Get a Sharkbite end cap and put on the end of the pipe coming up from below. Turn on the water to the house. Open the other hose bib and blow out the obstruction in this hose bib. You will probably want someone holding the hose in the bucket. You will want to open the other hose bib full force for few seconds. You don't want the tubing flying out of the bucket. Of course you will want this hose bib open also.

You can then remove the Sharkbite end cap and reconnect the two pipes with Sharkbite coupling.

No soldering.

You will need
Mini tubing cutter,
Sharkbite end cap,
Sharkbite coupling,
Sharkbite removal tool,
short piece of rubber or plastic tubing that will fit over 1/2" copper pipe
A 2 gallon bucket
Small hose clamp.
Garden hose
washing machine supply hose.

When reconnecting pipes you may or may not need to cut about 1/2 inch off one of the pipe to make room for the coupling. All depends on the flexibility of the pipes.
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Old 08-21-2017, 08:04 PM   #18
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Re: Getting a dribble out of spigot


After reading what hkstroud said about the dribble even if the main is on, I almost kicked myself, but then I realized I already did that. It did make me think more and more that it is a valve. I did remove the guts and jiggled a hanger in there, but to no avail.

My inspection camera came in so I started poking around. The pipe comes into the wall and into the basement ceiling. I drilled a hole in the general vicinity of where it came through the floor and into the basement and there was no valve to be found. Drilled a few more holes and narrowed it down, and then bingo. It was like finding the Titanic.

I cut a bigger hole in the ceiling to get my hand through, but one thing I noticed is that it is black. I tried turning it, but it didn't budge. Now I am not that strong and didn't force it, plus it is right against a beam so your knuckles hit the beam. The color of it bothered me so I thought I'd give an update so you guys can tell me what you think before I proceeded.
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Old 08-21-2017, 08:56 PM   #19
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Re: Getting a dribble out of spigot


Huzzah!! A stop valve. This right up there with electrical threads involving a 3-way switch where they swear there is no second switch, until there is one. If you are concerned about the black colour, don't be. I don't know if it is code or simply convention that residential faucets use blue for cold and red for hot, but in my limited experience it is rarely followed (the handle of your outside hose bib is brown). It may be plugged or partially closed but will probably start leaking once you dink with it since the seals and washers have gone hard from lack of movement.

If you do decide to fix/replace the stop valve, consider a different type or configuration that moves the handle away from the joist, and installing a heating vent ceiling grille for future access.

BTW, you mentioned "the owner" in a previous post. I'm not sure you should be DIYing something you don't own.

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Old 08-22-2017, 02:08 AM   #20
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Re: Getting a dribble out of spigot


I told you so, I told you so.
Congratulations.

My suggestion

You're going to have to open up the ceiling enough to get you hand up in there and to see what you are doing.

Cut the incoming pipe, the one going across the joist, as close to the elbow as possible. Looks like it is right up against that 2x4 so you may have to use a hacksaw.

Cut the pipe parallel to the joist about 6" way from the valve. (Mini tubing cutter)

Put a Sharkbite coupling on the pipe parallel to the joist.

Add a short piece of pipe long enough to reach the pipe coming across the joist.

Put on a Sharkbite 90 elbow.

Put a Sharkbite 90 on the pipe across the joist. If you had to cut that pipe with a hacksaw you probably should sand any burrs off the end to avoid the damaging "O" rings.

Connect the two 90s with a short piece of pipe.

You will need two Sharkbite 90 degree elbows and one Sharkbite coupling.
Two foot of 1/2" copper pipe
Mini tubing cutter
Hacksaw
Sand cloth

That valve is not doing anything for you. It appears to be just a stop valve not even a stop and waste valve. You could turn it off but you couldn't drain the pipe to the hose bib. With the frost free hose bid you don't need it.

The pipe parallel to the joist will move over to meet the now shorter pipe coming across the joist.
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Old 08-22-2017, 02:26 AM   #21
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Re: Getting a dribble out of spigot


I guess I should have ask which way you tried to turn the valve. It may be open or it may be closed. If it is close all you have to do is open it. Get a pair of pliers on it and try to turn counter clock wise.

It is probably closed. It also probably leaks so someone cranked down on it real hard to try to stop the leaking.

I must be slipping. I should have thought of that before I did my elaborate write up above.
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Old 08-22-2017, 09:44 AM   #22
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Re: Getting a dribble out of spigot


Included an image. Congrats gift. Get more yourself. You need a bigger hole. My min preference is 8x8" for one hand, enough pov angles and a decent adjustable wrench and room to turn it. Make it a square, and after the repair, you will need to put drywall j channel edges, screw in nailers, drywall square to fit and put edges on it too an screw that in. Leave it as access to that stop valve and put a label on it.

You can assume it's righty tighty lefty loosy. Loosen the packing nut a bit and try turning the valve handle. If you can't, loosen the nut some more. Main house shut off should be off. If you screw off the handle, nut should screw off and slide off the stem completely. If that valve is a kind with stem that can be removed, you should be able to turn the stem and whole body (the gut) should come out with a rubber washer on the end. Inside the body will be a seat. It looks like a ring. The surface of this seat must be smooth. The washer squeezes against this seat and makes a seal.

Or you can still leave the access but leave the stop valve turned on and forget about it. That's a joke. But turning the valve on to the fullest and a bit more makes fairly good seal against the packing nut and prevents more leaks from the packing nut. Tighten the nut snug and additional bit of tight turn. Don't forget to tighten but leave it loose. Sorry, more jokes. I'm just trying to let you know that you can tighten plumbing parts but only so far. In this case, for a complete novice, once you think it's snug, have somebody else turn the water on and look for leaks. Wait and see a minute. No leak, turn the nut maybe a quarter turn more and check the handle movement.

Search and learn how to change valve washer and packing nut seal.
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Old 09-23-2017, 04:22 PM   #23
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Re: Getting a dribble out of spigot


Update. I finally got around to changing out the shutoff valve. Since it was a dribble, I suspected a valve all along. What I did not expect is somebody finishing a basement around all of his water shutoff valves. If it froze and the pipe broke, there goes his finished basement. I'm just a little bent that somebody would do this. Anyway, I never replace a valve with another one of those hard to turn valves that you never know are open or closed. I use the quarter turn, easy to turn on and off ones. And yes, the valve was the problem. And yes, I cut a much bigger hole. Thank you everybody for all of your help!
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