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Old 09-16-2015, 12:11 AM   #1
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gas pipe with slight bend??


I needed to run a relatively short run across my soon to be drywalled basement ceiling with 3/4" black gas pipe, so in the future I can add a natural gas grill. I know the 3/4" is a bit oversized, but it's what I could easily tap into and I wanted it large enough to potentially handle a gas heater if I ever decided to.

In any case, the question is, is a slight bend over a 5' run a bad idea? This pipe is running just on the bottom of my floor joists for most of the run, but the last 2' or so needed to be bent up to clear the hole I put going outside, which is just above the sill plate. The top of the sill plate is obviously even with the bottom of the joists....so the pipe bends up, about 1-1/2" on the last ~2' to go out the wall. I was able to fairly easily able to push up on the pipe and get it to start threading into the coupler, then I put the pipe wrench on it to twist everything tight.

There are no leaks, but I worry that over time, maybe this wasn't the best idea. The original plan was to put a couple of elbows in, but I screwed up and bought the 5' pipe instead of a 4' pipe like I was planning and when I went to install it, the length was perfect to terminate just outside, where it needed to end up, so I went for it. I now somewhat worry, maybe I should undo it and get a shorter pipe and install the elbows.

I am also thinking of shaving about 1/2" of material off the last joist to see if that removes most of the bend, which is actually probably more of a bow than a bend. Part of my concern is that when I had to twist the pipe into the fitting, it had to 'bend'/'flex' each time I twisted it, so it is now shiny all the way around where it meets the last joist. Hope that part makes sense...

Thoughts???
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Old 09-18-2015, 03:07 AM   #2
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Any suggestions on this?
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Old 09-18-2015, 05:12 AM   #3
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We wouldn't tolerate a bend if we were to pay a licensed plumber, although many would do just that, but for a DIY person it will be just fine if the pipe is seamless.
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Old 09-18-2015, 07:46 AM   #4
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pipes should not be under stress like that. I'd go back to the the tee and 90 up into the joist area and then drill the joist for the short branch run. If you leave the bottom 2" of joist intact when drilling, it won't hurt the joist strength
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Old 09-19-2015, 07:32 PM   #5
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I went ahead and swapped the pipe out today. I had some of the swab on leak test stuff and see no bubbles. I even sprayed some soapy water on the joints and pipes. Again no bubbles. Should i still pressure test this? I'm not sure i have a gauge but suppose i could get one.

Wouldn't worry much but i want to sheet rock over this pipe.
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Old 09-19-2015, 07:34 PM   #6
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I'm also curious about the lighter method of checking. I know what some/most will say and i fully understand. Only reason i really ask is a plumber did this once and said no real threat, just small flame......i think i even asked the gas man and i think he unofficially replied the same.
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Old 09-19-2015, 08:13 PM   #7
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Menards has a gas sniffer for about $25---I usually just use my nose---

I had a bad batch of 90s on one job---who would have figured 4-- 90s could be bad?

That is when I got the sniffer.
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Old 09-19-2015, 08:16 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Master Brian View Post
I'm also curious about the lighter method of checking. I know what some/most will say and i fully understand. Only reason i really ask is a plumber did this once and said no real threat, just small flame......i think i even asked the gas man and i think he unofficially replied the same.
Regardless of what the plumber or gas man said, I wouldn't recommend checking it with a lighter.

Line should be pressure tested first then checked for leaks with just plain soapy water in a spray bottle will do. Just a suggestion. Up to you.

Last edited by jmon; 09-19-2015 at 08:21 PM.
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Old 09-19-2015, 08:18 PM   #9
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If the sniffer is reliable, that's well worth it. I'll admit I've tried the lighter, but that's only AFTER i leak test with the other methods. I worry about down the road a few days or if there is a very small leak.

On this what worried me is that an older connection twisted some, but it seams to check out.
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Old 10-18-2015, 11:10 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Master Brian View Post
I'm also curious about the lighter method of checking. I know what some/most will say and i fully understand. Only reason i really ask is a plumber did this once and said no real threat, just small flame......i think i even asked the gas man and i think he unofficially replied the same.
I don't like the lighter method because if the leak is too small it will not light at all and if it is too large you know what might happen.

Air pressure and time is the only way to know for sure it is not leaking. Soapy water is for finding the leaks if it fails after the air test. The lighter is no good here as air does not ignite.
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