Copper Lines - Lead? - Plumbing - DIY Home Improvement | DIYChatroom
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Plumbing

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Display Modes
Old 02-11-2016, 09:14 AM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 173
Rewards Points: 180
Default

Copper lines - lead?


I recently learned of the potential of lead to leech into drinking water if you have an older home with lead pipes because of the solder used. My home was built in 67' and it has copper pipes.

I'm just wondering if this is a major issue, or over blown? I do have a two year old, but we use a pitcher to filter our drinking and cooking water so he's only getting it in the tub and when he brushes his teeth.

Is it worth it to invest in a lead-free faucet?
boondocks95 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-11-2016, 09:20 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Ohio
Posts: 5,657
Rewards Points: 1,860
Default


If your concerned get this http://www.walmart.com/ip/10099170?w...700581&veh=sem
Ghostmaker is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-11-2016, 09:34 AM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Maine
Posts: 9,774
Rewards Points: 2,178
Default


I built a house in 70 and we had already switched over to lead free, 67 is borderline.

The instructions for testing are to test the water after it has been running for a minute. I don't remember the details, but it is the water that stands for long periods near the lead based solder. Once it is running the lead levels drop to extremely low, in other words you see the lead content of the water without the contamination of local solder connections.

For peace of mind, review the testing procedures and have your water tested. Also, if any of your plumbing is accessible, like an unfinished basement, much of that old copper can easily be replaced with pex. At least so far they havn't found anything wrong with that approach.

But you may not have an issue, being a 67 home and in any case, just avoid drinking from the initial water out of the faucet until you know for sure.

Bud
Bud9051 is online now   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-11-2016, 10:03 AM   #4
Member
 
WhatRnsdownhill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 1,104
Rewards Points: 2,220
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by boondocks95 View Post
I recently learned of the potential of lead to leech into drinking water if you have an older home with lead pipes because of the solder used. My home was built in 67' and it has copper pipes.

I'm just wondering if this is a major issue, or over blown? I do have a two year old, but we use a pitcher to filter our drinking and cooking water so he's only getting it in the tub and when he brushes his teeth.

Is it worth it to invest in a lead-free faucet?
for the most part, if its copper lines with leaded solder, not much to worry about, as the amount of solder exposed inside the pipe should be almost none, lead water main...I would look to get replaced....older facets used lead to seal pin holes and porous brass, but again most people run the water a few seconds to get cold water out and the water that would have the lead leeched into it is down the drain..if your still worried you can install a seperate water fill for drinking and cooking water and many good multi stage filters will take all the nasties out of that water..
WhatRnsdownhill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2016, 10:22 AM   #5
Civil Engineer
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Boston
Posts: 5,832
Rewards Points: 5,246
Default


The OPS said "if you have an older home with lead pipes because of the solder used". Lead pipes are typically not soldered together, and lead pipes are a definite potential hazard. That said, perhaps the OPS meant he had copper pipes that used lead containing solder. My 1959 house was built using copper pipes, and the solder used was the old 50/50, meaning 50 lead, 50% tin. Eventually my pipes developed pinhole leaks due to acidic well water, and I replaced all the pipes with PEX.

If you have copper pipes soldered together, you may want to invest in a water quality test, the lab can check for lead in your water. The lab will provide you the bottle for the sample, along with explicit instructions on how to take the sample and get it to the lab for analysis.
Daniel Holzman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2016, 11:14 AM   #6
Member
 
WhatRnsdownhill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 1,104
Rewards Points: 2,220
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman View Post
The OPS said "if you have an older home with lead pipes because of the solder used". Lead pipes are typically not soldered together, and lead pipes are a definite potential hazard. That said, perhaps the OPS meant he had copper pipes that used lead containing solder. My 1959 house was built using copper pipes, and the solder used was the old 50/50, meaning 50 lead, 50% tin. Eventually my pipes developed pinhole leaks due to acidic well water, and I replaced all the pipes with PEX.

If you have copper pipes soldered together, you may want to invest in a water quality test, the lab can check for lead in your water. The lab will provide you the bottle for the sample, along with explicit instructions on how to take the sample and get it to the lab for analysis.
read the last sentence of the ops first paragraph............"My home was built in 67' and it has copper pipes."
WhatRnsdownhill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2016, 11:21 AM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 173
Rewards Points: 180
Default


My apologies, I meant copper in both instances and yes, I do have copper pipes. We are actually going to do a bathroom gut and would have access to nearly all the pipes, BUT because of all the repairs I don't think we would be able to afford all of that. We are hoping to sale in the next year anyhow.

I wonder if we have leaks though. We are having to do the bathroom gut because of mold, so I'll have to investigate once the sheetrock is torn. I do have lots of green spots on the pipes, so I assume there have been leaks in the past.

I'll have my child's lead levels tested and go from there. Thanks for all the helpful advice !
boondocks95 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2016, 03:42 AM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Northern California
Posts: 14,485
Rewards Points: 4,980
Default


boondocks95 - double-check that the filter pitcher you have does filter lead, I assumed Brita did & then realized after a year that it didn't! It seems like it filtered everything BUT lead! A better product for lead filtering appears to be the filter you attach to the faucet. Both Pur and Brita make those.

I've also read that hot water has more lead. Sorry no reference right now.
Nik333 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2016, 04:07 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 173
Rewards Points: 180
Default


I have the best rated pitcher filter according to my research. I use a Zero filter.
boondocks95 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2016, 06:45 PM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 173
Rewards Points: 180
Default


We do have a LOT of those gator bites because my husband had to fix a leak himself a couple years ago. I assume the brass has lead. Would this be a concern?
boondocks95 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2016, 09:40 PM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 2,467
Rewards Points: 2,906
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by boondocks95 View Post
We do have a LOT of those gator bites because my husband had to fix a leak himself a couple years ago. I assume the brass has lead. Would this be a concern?
Gator Bite fittings work on copper pipe.

There won't be any lead in the copper pipes. Brass is an alloy of copper and zinc, so there won't be any lead in the brass fittings. Bronze is an allow of copper and tin, so there won't be any lead in your bronze water valves on the copper water supply piping.

The only place I can see lead is in the solder joints in your copper water supply piping; both hot and cold water lines.
__________________
Bashing my head against the walls in some of the internet's finest chat rooms.
Nestor_Kelebay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2016, 09:44 PM   #12
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 173
Rewards Points: 180
Default


I don't really understand how plumbing works. Are you saying the copper slides down into the brass and thus the water wouldn't touch the brass fittings?

I was reading that only recently did they start making these lead free and of course gators are made in China.

I can't help but think if it weren't an issue why you couldn't buy them in VT or CA?
boondocks95 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2016, 05:16 AM   #13
A "Handy Husband"
 
rjniles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: South Carolina Low Country
Posts: 11,095
Rewards Points: 804
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by Nestor_Kelebay View Post
Gator Bite fittings work on copper pipe.

There won't be any lead in the copper pipes. Brass is an alloy of copper and zinc, so there won't be any lead in the brass fittings. Bronze is an allow of copper and tin, so there won't be any lead in your bronze water valves on the copper water supply piping.

The only place I can see lead is in the solder joints in your copper water supply piping; both hot and cold water lines.
Until about 2006, brass use in plumbing fittings contained about 8% lead. Recent lead free regulations still allow up to 2%.
__________________
My electrical answers are based on 2017 NEC, you may have local amendments.

Location: Coastal South Carolina
rjniles is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2016, 05:57 AM   #14
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 12,300
Rewards Points: 5,600
Default


This may be useful if you haven't read it.

http://allthumbsdiy.com/reviews/shar...ite-vs-tectite
SeniorSitizen is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2016, 08:03 AM   #15
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 173
Rewards Points: 180
Default


Well I counted and there are about five of them all next to the water heater (the GatorBITES). They do comply with NSF-61 but not the latest version since this was done in 2012.

I can't exactly justify re-doing all the plumbing. It is what everyone had until 2014 so I will live with it.
boondocks95 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Is it OK if my central AC's copper line is "kinked"? miamicuse HVAC 10 12-28-2015 03:56 PM
splitting copper lines myself? vote4Pedro Plumbing 3 05-15-2011 05:57 PM
Copper Pipe Water Lines trophywalleye Plumbing 3 03-04-2011 08:44 PM
Low point in water supply lines dave11 Plumbing 3 02-01-2011 07:13 PM
plumbing copper for HVAC refrigerant lines? Mike in Arkansas HVAC 9 03-21-2010 08:52 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts