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Old 07-08-2019, 04:11 PM   #1
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cockroach bait and domino effect


Hi!

I'm suffering from a german cockroach infestation. I seem to be having success killing them with 1) raid baits 2) DIY baits with various combinations of sugar and flour (as the bait) and baking soda and boric acid (as the poison). There are corpses everywhere!

My question: do I leave all the corpses in the hopes that they poison the remaining cannibalistic cockroaches, or do I clean them up to avoid attracting more of them into my home?

Apologies if this has been asked elsewhere - I've been searching all day and can't find a definitive answer ANYWHERE.
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Old 07-08-2019, 04:42 PM   #2
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Re: cockroach bait and domino effect


I know carpenter ants will collect their dead and i assume they re-purpose them. I would leave a few out to see if they disappear.

Also not sure if the concentration they would get would be fetal or not. Since your bait is working that may be the best place to focus your efforts.

Not a bug pro.

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Old 07-08-2019, 06:04 PM   #3
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Re: cockroach bait and domino effect


Since they can carry disease, I'd clean them up. Dead cockroaches break down & break apart into pieces & dust.
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Old 07-08-2019, 08:03 PM   #4
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Re: cockroach bait and domino effect


The poison bates work via cannibalism, you may eliminate the infestation faster if you don't clean them up.
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Old 07-09-2019, 06:04 AM   #5
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Re: cockroach bait and domino effect


I had a rental once that was infested. That boric acid was the bomb. I left the dead until I didn't see any more live ones then cleaned up and sprinkled a bit more clean boric acid. Job done.
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Old 07-09-2019, 06:23 AM   #6
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Re: cockroach bait and domino effect


If I were living in the space, I would have to clean them up. For every one you see dead, there will be exponentially more unseen for the live critters to digest.
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Old 07-14-2019, 12:25 PM   #7
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Re: cockroach bait and domino effect


Vacuum vacuum vacuum! If the bait is readily available they will eat that before they eat each other. Keep a fresh supply of different baits out.
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Old Today, 10:02 AM   #8
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Re: cockroach bait and domino effect


Quote:
Originally Posted by Nik333 View Post
Since they can carry disease, I'd clean them up. Dead cockroaches break down & break apart into pieces & dust.
What diseases do they carry?
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Old Today, 10:05 AM   #9
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Re: cockroach bait and domino effect


@sooper , welcome!

Sounds like you're doing a good job on the adults.

The babies, which will hatch from egg cases, can be eradicated with growth inhibitor. It won't hurt you or your pets, but keeps baby roaches from reaching maturity by preventing them from moulting.

And, it also kills flea larvae! (I have cats, so I appreciate.)

Spray under the fridge, etc., any place that won't get wet and wash the stuff away.

https://www.amazon.com/Gentrol-IGR-I...NsaWNrPXRydWU=
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Old Today, 12:13 PM   #10
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Re: cockroach bait and domino effect


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Originally Posted by DoomsDave View Post
What diseases do they carry?

"In one study, the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found to have increased multiple-fold over the course of 114 days in the gut of a cockroach (3).
In this regard, roaches are not so much vectors as they are reservoirs; a mosquito will squelch its proboscis in your ankle, inoculating you with malaria in their quest for blood but a cockroach indiscriminately contaminates anything lying around. Entomologists describe this process as “mechanical transmission”, indirectly transmitting disease to humans.

All types of passengers are welcome on this cockroach bus. Over 30 species of bacteria have been found on the cuticle and gut of roaches, including those of serious medical import such as E. coli, various species of Salmonella and Staphylcoccous, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae (4). These bacteria cause diseases such as urinary tract infections, dysentery, diarrhea, pneumonia, cholera, polio, septicemia and wound infections (5). One study that trapped cockroaches in order to measure their bacterial load found that number was as high as 14 million microbes found on the exterior of the bodies, and 7 million in their fecal droppings (5).
Viable eggs and dormant cysts of parasites also hitch a ride; the culprits include the ova of Ascaris lumbricoides (giant roundworm), Anchylostoma deodunale (hookworm), Trichuris trichura (whipworm), Enterobius vermicularis (pinworm) and Strongyloides stercoralis (threadworm), and the cysts of Entomoeba hystolitica, Balantidium coli, C. parvum, C. cayetenensis and Isospora belli (4). Even the virus that causes polio, poliomyelitis, has been found within the guts of cockroaches (6).
There are several documented cases of small outbreaks that pinpoint to cockroaches playing an indirect but prominent role in disease transmission. In one county in Northern Ireland in the late 1970s, fifteen food-handlers in various establishments fell ill to dysentery caused by the Shigella bacterium over the course of eight weeks (2). These restaurants had serious infestations, particularly in the kitchen and dining areas, and the stomach contents of trapped roaches showed viable Shigella dysenteriae serotype 7 bacteria, incriminating the arthropods in the spread of the disease.
Cockroaches were also suspected to be the cause of a hepatitis A outbreak in a Los Angeles housing project in the late 1950s. From 1956 to 1959, the Carmelitos Housing Project represented 39% of all cases of hepatitis A in Los Angeles County with numbers of the infected steadily increasing through the years (7). It was only until a full-scale cockroach control program employing a newly developed insecticide, the industrial silica aerogel Dri-Die 67, was the outbreak halted. Two years following the program, incidences of hepatitis A from the Housing Project dropped to 0.0% and cockroaches traversing between the sewage system and the Project were pinpointed as the source of the epidemic.

Typhoid patients in Italy were found to have cockroaches harboring S. typhi in their homes in a study conducted in 1943 (2). Similarly, the same organism was found in cockroaches infesting a Belgian hospital’s children’s ward undergoing an epidemic of gastroenteritis in 1950 (2). Most recently, outbreaks of Klebsiella pneumoniae in neonatal units have been tied to cockroach infestations in hospitals in Ethiopia and South Africa (8)(9). These studies indicate that cockroaches may play an unappreciated role in the epidemiology of infections in both the home and hospital."


http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/bo...9/cockroaches/





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Old Today, 02:31 PM   #11
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Re: cockroach bait and domino effect


Quote:
Originally Posted by Nik333 View Post
"In one study, the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found to have increased multiple-fold over the course of 114 days in the gut of a cockroach (3).
In this regard, roaches are not so much vectors as they are reservoirs; a mosquito will squelch its proboscis in your ankle, inoculating you with malaria in their quest for blood but a cockroach indiscriminately contaminates anything lying around. Entomologists describe this process as “mechanical transmission”, indirectly transmitting disease to humans.

All types of passengers are welcome on this cockroach bus. Over 30 species of bacteria have been found on the cuticle and gut of roaches, including those of serious medical import such as E. coli, various species of Salmonella and Staphylcoccous, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae (4). These bacteria cause diseases such as urinary tract infections, dysentery, diarrhea, pneumonia, cholera, polio, septicemia and wound infections (5). One study that trapped cockroaches in order to measure their bacterial load found that number was as high as 14 million microbes found on the exterior of the bodies, and 7 million in their fecal droppings (5).
Viable eggs and dormant cysts of parasites also hitch a ride; the culprits include the ova of Ascaris lumbricoides (giant roundworm), Anchylostoma deodunale (hookworm), Trichuris trichura (whipworm), Enterobius vermicularis (pinworm) and Strongyloides stercoralis (threadworm), and the cysts of Entomoeba hystolitica, Balantidium coli, C. parvum, C. cayetenensis and Isospora belli (4). Even the virus that causes polio, poliomyelitis, has been found within the guts of cockroaches (6).
There are several documented cases of small outbreaks that pinpoint to cockroaches playing an indirect but prominent role in disease transmission. In one county in Northern Ireland in the late 1970s, fifteen food-handlers in various establishments fell ill to dysentery caused by the Shigella bacterium over the course of eight weeks (2). These restaurants had serious infestations, particularly in the kitchen and dining areas, and the stomach contents of trapped roaches showed viable Shigella dysenteriae serotype 7 bacteria, incriminating the arthropods in the spread of the disease.
Cockroaches were also suspected to be the cause of a hepatitis A outbreak in a Los Angeles housing project in the late 1950s. From 1956 to 1959, the Carmelitos Housing Project represented 39% of all cases of hepatitis A in Los Angeles County with numbers of the infected steadily increasing through the years (7). It was only until a full-scale cockroach control program employing a newly developed insecticide, the industrial silica aerogel Dri-Die 67, was the outbreak halted. Two years following the program, incidences of hepatitis A from the Housing Project dropped to 0.0% and cockroaches traversing between the sewage system and the Project were pinpointed as the source of the epidemic.

Typhoid patients in Italy were found to have cockroaches harboring S. typhi in their homes in a study conducted in 1943 (2). Similarly, the same organism was found in cockroaches infesting a Belgian hospital’s children’s ward undergoing an epidemic of gastroenteritis in 1950 (2). Most recently, outbreaks of Klebsiella pneumoniae in neonatal units have been tied to cockroach infestations in hospitals in Ethiopia and South Africa (8)(9). These studies indicate that cockroaches may play an unappreciated role in the epidemiology of infections in both the home and hospital."


http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/bo...9/cockroaches/





Interesting!
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