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Old 06-25-2014, 10:33 AM   #1
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Vinyl Tile in Kitchen


Hello,

I am not sure if this is the appropriate forum to post this to, since the focus here is predominantly on ceramic tiles... if not, please my apologies.

I am planning to install a peel and stick vinyl tile in my kitchen. As the pictures below show, I am adding a 1/4" plywood as an underlayer. I have laid them out on the kitchen floor, but before I move ahead I wanted to clarify a few issues:

1. The seams between plywood joints. I want to seal them so they are tight enough. How tight should they be - Picture1 below is an example of how tight some of the seams are - are they tight enough? If not, what procedure should I use to seal them?

2. Picture2 is an example of some small spaces that are left uncovered. One prominent one is in the entrance way. Should I cover these with small plants of wood - nailed/glued down?

3. Picture3 shows a tight space between the lower cabinets and the floor. I need to nail down the plywoods there - but given tight space how do I get the nails in there ?

4. Finally, is it better to use nails or staples - please what would you recommend ?

thanks - Oyii
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Vinyl Tile in Kitchen-tight-enough-.jpg   Vinyl Tile in Kitchen-entryway-how-fill-planks.jpg   Vinyl Tile in Kitchen-under-counter-how-nail-staples.jpg  
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Old 06-25-2014, 11:48 AM   #2
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Got a mess there.
Seams should not line up like that. First piece should have been cut to offset the seams.
If it's not nailed down yet recut a new piece to get rid of those gaps at the door way.
Worst place to have a gap because of it being a traffic area.
With a pneumatic narrow crown staple gun you do not have to go back and fill all the flaws where the nails area and set in auto is at least 10 times faster.
Any and all flaws need to be filled, including any gaps at the seams.
Needs to be fastened every 4" on the edges and 6 to 8" in the field.
There is no need to nail it up under the tie kick. Just add 1/4 round moulding in that area.
And last, and I can not stress this enough do not use peel and stick tiles for anyone of many many reasons!
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Old 06-25-2014, 12:50 PM   #3
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To fill the seams use a cementious based filler, not gypsum based. I like the staples 2" on the edge and 4" to 6" in the field. And as Joe said, peel and stick is a temporary floor covering. They tend to shrink, they don't stick very well and they wear out quickly.
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Old 06-25-2014, 01:54 PM   #4
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Thanks to you both. I realized my mistake about the placement (I would blame the wifey who has around distracting me :-)). I didn't nail them down yet - I've got a new ply and would place them in a non-overlapping manner.

Secondly, we plan to install hardwood floors in about a year or two, hence wanted something temporary for about a year or two. Instead of the vinyl tiles, what would you suggest as a replacement, given my plans.

Thanks - Oyiwaa
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Old 06-25-2014, 02:10 PM   #5
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Install vinyl linoleum and the maid won't want wood in a couple of years after she sees how easy it is to maintain.
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Old 06-25-2014, 02:54 PM   #6
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Thanks .. pardon my ignorance - but are vinyl linoleum the same as vinyl sheets ? for example is it one of the following:

http://www.avalonflooring.com/produc...FQIT7Aod8Q8A5A


or

http://www.armstrong.com/flooring/products/linoleum


Thanks - Oyii
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Old 06-25-2014, 02:57 PM   #7
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Look at the solid vinyl, like IVC. Very easy for a DIYer to install. Doesn't even need to be glued.
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Old 06-25-2014, 03:31 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oyiwaa View Post
Thanks .. pardon my ignorance - but are vinyl linoleum the same as vinyl sheets ? for example is it one of the following:

http://www.avalonflooring.com/produc...FQIT7Aod8Q8A5A


or

http://www.armstrong.com/flooring/products/linoleum


Thanks - Oyii
Please excuse me. Linoleum - That's an old fashion word I learned back in the 40s and it probably isn't appropriate today. Some of you younger kids help us us out there please.

We have vinyl something that looks like tile, in kitchen, dining, utility and all baths on concrete floor. This we have now was installed on top of old vinyl of 20 years. It showed no wear but the Mrs was doing one of those make over things and I left for 2 weeks. Not good work for my old bones.
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Old 06-27-2014, 09:53 AM   #9
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Thanks to you all. I have done some more research and observations and decided to return the peel & stick tiles.

Instead, I am considering the Luxury Vinyl Tiles (LVT) made by either Armstrong or Mohawk.

I am still torn between either getting a floating floor (the click type) or a vinyl sheet that I can glue down.

What are the pros and cons of each: the click or glued-down?

Thanks - Oyii
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