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Old 09-12-2011, 06:42 PM   #16
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So the 1X6 was "kiln dried" when you bought it?
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Old 09-12-2011, 06:43 PM   #17
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lol. couldnt tell you. But what i can is that i have handled alot wetter boards than what i put down. while screwing them down i wasnt getting any water coming back through.
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Old 09-12-2011, 09:45 PM   #18
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Pressure treated should not be used indoors, and never as a subfloor component. Just because you didn't get squirted in the face while fastening them, doesn't mean they were not that wet. I don't know how long it takes for wet wood to dry in Georgia. However air dry is not the same as kiln dried.

Since they're down and hopefully well screwed, and it's your house so I don't have to warranty anything, go ahead a leave them. I'm not that worried about square edge instead of t&g part. Most old plank floors around here were like that......but not PT of course. Over that was 3/4" hardwood or perhaps 5/8" or 3/4" ply, then the floor covering.

Because of the above circumstances, why not install the t&g AdvanTech or plywood as if it was the subfloor. In other words fastened to the joists as apposed to just the planks as we normally suggest. This way the extra fasteners may help steady those planks. Then go with a 1/4" concrete backer or better yet Ditra then your tiles.

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what about porcelain tile? Laminate?
What! Porcelain tiles and laminate in the same sentence?

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Old 09-13-2011, 12:31 AM   #19
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Some p.t. wood is "kdbpt" or kiln dried before pressure treated. If no kd on the end labels, they will twist and warp when drying. Be sure to cover the dirt in crawl space and add a vapor retarder under the Advantek because it is just a denser (pressed harder) OSB product. IF OK by JazMan and Bud....... Look at regular OSB and Advantek (OSB) compared to real plywood swelling at 72 hours, page 2 here; https://utextension.tennessee.edu/pu...ments/W176.pdf Keep it dry!! Why didn't you use a structural sub-floor decking? I hope you ran the boards diagonally......at 16"o.c. joists.


More on underlayment installation; http://www.apawood.org/pablog/index....-Floor-Systems


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Old 09-13-2011, 03:01 PM   #20
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Pressure treated should not be used indoors, and never as a subfloor component. Just because you didn't get squirted in the face while fastening them, doesn't mean they were not that wet. I don't know how long it takes for wet wood to dry in Georgia. However air dry is not the same as kiln dried.
reason being is because we were worried about water damage again. The sliding door that was put in before we bought this place was never caulked and sealed, water was getting in and soaking into the plywood, and the floor joists. after i had it repaired, i just didnt want to take any chances.

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Since they're down and hopefully well screwed, and it's your house so I don't have to warranty anything, go ahead a leave them. I'm not that worried about square edge instead of t&g part. Most old plank floors around here were like that......but not PT of course. Over that was 3/4" hardwood or perhaps 5/8" or 3/4" ply, then the floor covering.
thats exactly how the living room is. dont worry, they are screwed down well.

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Because of the above circumstances, why not install the t&g AdvanTech or plywood as if it was the subfloor. In other words fastened to the joists as apposed to just the planks as we normally suggest. This way the extra fasteners may help steady those planks. Then go with a 1/4" concrete backer or better yet Ditra then your tiles.
what are the advantages of the Ditra mat over concrete board? Ive seen alot of stuff about it but never used or seen it.


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What! Porcelain tiles and laminate in the same sentence?
The kitchen has been blown apart for almost a year. what began as something simple, installing a new oven and stove, turned into having to fix everything else. had to upgrade the electrical in the house. house still had the original 60 amp service from when it was built in 1958. rewired EVERYTHING, and now have breakers and a 200 amp service instead of fuses and 60 amp. then the whole deal with the sliding door leaking and being the root cause of the plywood under the laminate to start messing up.

We are just ready to have it put back together. like i said, we want tile, but we are about frustrated with this whole thing and want to get it back together. so we're looking at all flooring as backup plans

Jaz[/quote]
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Old 09-13-2011, 04:11 PM   #21
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The older P.T. wood was treated with arsenic. Not a good idea to use indoors.
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Old 09-13-2011, 04:22 PM   #22
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The older P.T. wood was treated with arsenic. Not a good idea to use indoors.
its not older wood. its new
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Old 09-13-2011, 04:32 PM   #23
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According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the most common oil-based preservatives are creosote, pentachlorophenol, and copper naphthenate. "None of these are suitable for indoor residential use." Creosote is made from coal tar, turns the wood dark brown or black and gives the surface an oily feel. It is used for railroad ties and utility posts. Pentachlorophenol and copper naphthenate are crystals that must dissolve in oil. When either are used, the color of the wood depends on the oil in which they are dissolved
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Old 09-13-2011, 05:06 PM   #24
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At any rate.

None of it has ever been suitable for indoor use as far as I have ever known. In fact the penta and nap at one time came with warning labels stapled to each and every board stating such.
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Old 09-13-2011, 09:17 PM   #25
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Unfortunately many people think PT will solve their moisture problems since it shouldn't rot. Not so. Even if it does hold together, it will swell when damp causing movement in the finished floor. PT is very unstable and should not be used as a substrate to tile on to, even for exterior projects. "Exterior Grade" plywood does not mean Pressure Treated. Rather it refers to the waterproof adhesive used to glue the plies together.

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what are the advantages of the Ditra mat over concrete board?
There are several advantages. It's very light. It only adds 1/8" installed. It uncouples the tile work from the substrate therefore shrinkage and expansion in the subfloor is not likely to transfer and ruin the floor. It equalizes moisture spots, the mini columns create a high load bearing base. It's orange in color.

Please hang in there, don't just make a decision to get it over with. You'll be better off to get what you want even if it means a little more time and $$$.

Jaz
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Old 09-14-2011, 02:51 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JazMan View Post
Unfortunately many people think PT will solve their moisture problems since it shouldn't rot. Not so. Even if it does hold together, it will swell when damp causing movement in the finished floor. PT is very unstable and should not be used as a substrate to tile on to, even for exterior projects. "Exterior Grade" plywood does not mean Pressure Treated. Rather it refers to the waterproof adhesive used to glue the plies together.



There are several advantages. It's very light. It only adds 1/8" installed. It uncouples the tile work from the substrate therefore shrinkage and expansion in the subfloor is not likely to transfer and ruin the floor. It equalizes moisture spots, the mini columns create a high load bearing base. It's orange in color.

Please hang in there, don't just make a decision to get it over with. You'll be better off to get what you want even if it means a little more time and $$$.

Jaz
so in this instance, it definately sounds like using the Ditra mat is going to be the way to go. agreed?

question about the Ditra. I know with the concrete board, you have to go in the gaps with the mesh tape and thinset. What do you do with the ditra? just lay it next to each other? does it get taped down?
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Old 09-14-2011, 03:52 PM   #27
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Quote:
What do you do with the ditra? just lay it next to each other? does it get taped down?
Yup.

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hat do you do with the ditra? just lay it next to each other? does it get taped down?
Nope.
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Old 09-14-2011, 03:54 PM   #28
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Ditra seams are just butted, even a small gap is fine, makes no dif. If you want to waterproof the seams you can apply strips of Kerdi Band on them. However floors are not required to be water-tight. It would be difficult to do anyway because of pipe perforations and doorways.

If you go with Ditra, you'll want to use a modified mortar to install Ditra to plywood, then a high quality unmodified to install tiles over Ditra. Even with porcelain tiles which when installed over anything else requires modified thin set.

Jaz
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Old 09-14-2011, 06:22 PM   #29
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Quote:
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Ditra seams are just butted, even a small gap is fine, makes no dif. If you want to waterproof the seams you can apply strips of Kerdi Band on them. However floors are not required to be water-tight. It would be difficult to do anyway because of pipe perforations and doorways.

If you go with Ditra, you'll want to use a modified mortar to install Ditra to plywood, then a high quality unmodified to install tiles over Ditra. Even with porcelain tiles which when installed over anything else requires modified thin set.

Jaz
the tiles we like are porcelain so that is good to know. any suggestions on both mortars?
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Old 09-14-2011, 08:08 PM   #30
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I knew you were going with porcelain, most floor tiles are porcelain these days. I just mentioned it because normally you would have to use a modified thin set to install porcelain. Not so with Ditra.

Suggestions? Any modified mortar should work fine to install Ditra to plywood. If it's recommended for over ply, it's ok. Finding a quality unmodified isn't as easy. Example, the orange place has no good quality unmodified mortar. At least not around here. I believe all HD's carry Custom's products and I believe their Customblend is a notch above dirt, real bad stuff.

My favorite is Ditraset which is made especially with Ditra & Kerdi in mind. Laticrete #372 & Mapei's Kerabond are fine too. What brands are available near you?

Jaz
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