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Old 10-06-2015, 04:30 PM   #1
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New floorboards are too thick, please help!


I need to weave in new floorboards to fill this hole



Except the new floorboards are about 1/16 inch too thick (2 1/4 wide, 3/4 thick unfinished rustic maple).I tried to plane one and the thickness is the same across the board but when I put it next to the existing floor, some areas are thicker than others (I assume it's because of uneven subfloor).
What are my options? I don't have the budget to get it professionally done right now but the floor needs to be filled in. Should I just install them as is and plane them right there (dangerous?). Should I install and sand them with a hand sander? I tried to sand just a tiny area and it took forever .
The boards are also very slightly too wide so it's really really difficult to get them in between 2 existing boards. Are they supposed to be that tight? Or do I need to sand down the width too?

I'm a very new DIY'er so please explain to me why I should and should not do something. Any information is greatly appreciated
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Old 10-06-2015, 04:44 PM   #2
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I'm curious.... is the flooring that is showing in the picture also new?
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Old 10-06-2015, 04:50 PM   #3
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I'm curious.... is the flooring that is showing in the picture also new?
You mean the existing floorboards? We bought the house 10 months ago and it looked like it had just been refinished. The house was built in 2005 so the existing floor can't be older than that. The hole is left over from removing a fireplace to make room for a pool table (that's the area with the pink underlayment). I removed some extra floorboards so the new ones can be weaved in.
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Old 10-06-2015, 04:54 PM   #4
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Install the new and sand it level and refinish floor.
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Old 10-06-2015, 04:59 PM   #5
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Ok.... well, the first thing that comes to mind, is different MFG's may have different specs for what they call 2-3/4" x 1/2" flooring. Our sister company is a wholesale moulding and millwork business, and the same profile mouldings can vary by 1/16" to 1/8" difference, even on the same call sizes. Something as common as 2-1/4" colonial casing (which practically everyone makes) can definitely vary from MFG. to MFG.

I would suggest grabbing a piece of the older floor that you took up, grab your tape measure and start visiting flooring stores. My guess is you've got product from different MFG's. that although have the same call size, very possibly were made from different specs.
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Old 10-06-2015, 05:04 PM   #6
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Install the new and sand it level and refinish floor.
That's definitely doable. Of course, the OP could rent a heavy duty floor sander with some aggressive pads/paper and knock it out fairly quickly.

But, what worries me.... is not the height difference necessarily, but the different widths between the new and old flooring.
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Old 10-06-2015, 05:13 PM   #7
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If the existing floor was installed right (and sounds like it was), a floor nailer would have been used which means every one of those boards are cinched up pretty good to the next one. It's not going to be easy getting new boards in. Snug fit is an understatement.

As for the difference in height.....floor sander. No way around it. If it was me, I'd hit the edges with a palm sander first to get them close and then let the floor sander do the rest.

While DIY....this is a tough DIY....but very doable.
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Old 10-06-2015, 05:21 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rjniles View Post
Install the new and sand it level and refinish floor.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CompleteW&D View Post
Ok.... well, the first thing that comes to mind, is different MFG's may have different specs for what they call 2-3/4" x 1/2" flooring. Our sister company is a wholesale moulding and millwork business, and the same profile mouldings can vary by 1/16" to 1/8" difference, even on the same call sizes. Something as common as 2-1/4" colonial casing (which practically everyone makes) can definitely vary from MFG. to MFG.

I would suggest grabbing a piece of the older floor that you took up, grab your tape measure and start visiting flooring stores. My guess is you've got product from different MFG's. that although have the same call size, very possibly were made from different specs.
Thank you!

Quote:
Originally Posted by CompleteW&D View Post
That's definitely doable. Of course, the OP could rent a heavy duty floor sander with some aggressive pads/paper and knock it out fairly quickly.

But, what worries me.... is not the height difference necessarily, but the different widths between the new and old flooring.
Well, since I already bought the new floor, I guess I'll have to put a lot of elbow grease into trying to make the width fit >.>.

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If the existing floor was installed right (and sounds like it was), a floor nailer would have been used which means every one of those boards are cinched up pretty good to the next one. It's not going to be easy getting new boards in. Snug fit is an understatement.

As for the difference in height.....floor sander. No way around it. If it was me, I'd hit the edges with a palm sander first to get them close and then let the floor sander do the rest.

While DIY....this is a tough DIY....but very doable.
How much should I sand down the side? Enough that i can push with my palm and it will go in between the existing boards? Or that I have to hammer it several times? Right now I have to jump on it to get it in and after that it looks like it'll split the boards apart.
Is it easy to sand too much with a floor sander? Do you think it'll be possible to do this with a hand sander at all?

Thank you
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Old 10-06-2015, 06:37 PM   #9
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Jump on it?

If it was me....you start on one side and start inserting pieces. You do NOT start inserting pieces and moving towards the way.

You are going to go at an angle....say you start on the right side. Fill in one row at a time until you get to the wall. then the next row.

Your problem is, when done right....those boards don't slide.
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Old 10-07-2015, 02:42 PM   #10
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How big is the room.?

I've ran into the same problem a few times.
I cut the whole floor square.
Ran new floor as a border.
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Old 10-08-2015, 05:00 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ddawg16 View Post
Jump on it?

If it was me....you start on one side and start inserting pieces. You do NOT start inserting pieces and moving towards the way.

You are going to go at an angle....say you start on the right side. Fill in one row at a time until you get to the wall. then the next row.

Your problem is, when done right....those boards don't slide.
I mean there are spots where there are old boards on both sides so I have to get the new one in between them somehow and right now it requires a lot of force. Although I did some measurements and all the new boards are about 1/16-1/8" wide. I'll go over them with a planer.

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How big is the room.?

I've ran into the same problem a few times.
I cut the whole floor square.
Ran new floor as a border.
The room is about 20'x15' but it's open to the kitchen. I'd rather not remove more floor right now. This tiny area is already a lot of work T_T
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Old 10-08-2015, 07:24 PM   #12
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Well that only leaves one solution.
The flooring will have to be cut.
Then face nailed.
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