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Old 11-01-2015, 01:36 PM   #1
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Hardwood flooring throughout house


My wife and I are debating on buying hardwood/bamboo for our house. All our bedrooms, living room, hallway. Its about 700 Square feet total. Right now we have carpet throughout and it has a very bad smell to it! We can not seem to get it clean!

Our subfloor is plywood. What should I be looking at as for underlayment? Would Bamboo be a good durable choice, we have already eliminated laminate wood. While we are in the process we plan to put in new baseboard trim.

Im just asking for pretty much pros and cons of doing this? I might also need to ad we have 2 small dogs.

This is the flooring we both are leaning towards.

http://www.lumberliquidators.com/ll/...TKBAM/10033002
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Old 11-01-2015, 01:52 PM   #2
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7/16 is going to be a nail or staple job. As long as you have at least a sturdy 3/4" sub-floor I doubt you will need an underlayment.

If the carpet smell have soaked into the wood a coat of BINs might heal seal it up and contain it.

You might want to read news stories for the last 6 months about this company and the off gassing some of their products have.
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Old 11-01-2015, 05:14 PM   #3
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Agree with Colbyt about anything from those guy's, lot of bad press on their product.
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Old 11-01-2015, 06:32 PM   #4
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I was surprised when I turned to the "specs" page of that flooring and saw a very high hardness number. Bamboo is actually a grass, not a wood. So I did a google search on "Bamboo Janka Hardness" and the first return was:

http://bambooflooringreviews.org/?p=31

I am not endorsing this as being accurate either. I don't know. Just saying continue your research. Myself, I went with Engineered Oak, didn't even walk into the door of a LL.

Last edited by SPS-1; 11-01-2015 at 06:34 PM.
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Old 11-01-2015, 09:22 PM   #5
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We have 900 sq ft of morning star (?) strand bamboo in our basement over concrete and another hundred and fifty in our boy's bedroom on the second floor. Ours is no glue interlocking click type and installation was a breeze for a professional appearance. Yes, it is hard as rock. The click type provides perfect joints, doesn't require glue or staples and floats on top of the underlay. This stuff is easier to install than babysitting a contractor and has enough flex to accommodate the typical crowns encountered with concrete slab. The recommended underlay is 1/10" (?) recycled felt type cloth that I recall cost about 50 cents a square foot and comes with or without vapor barrier. We used 6 mil plastic with taped seams below vapor barrier underlay over the painted concrete basement floor and non vapor barrier in my boys room over OSB sub flooring. I recall bamboo is not recommended over concrete or below grade. I suspect due to moisture potential.

Across 30 feet of planks in the basement, we had a joint separate with first winter low humidity but this doesn't look like a issue now after a couple seasonal cycles. The boy’s room floor spans about 12 feet across planks and we have no issues. On two occasions, the basement bamboo got wet. Once from a duct humidifier leaking and another from our fish tank leaking. The bamboo absorbed the water, buckled and the finish suffered. In both cases over several months, the floor dried and settled back. I now need to show you the difference between the soaked and untouched planks. Any wood flooring will suffer water's wrath, but this bamboo should be kept clear of kitchens and entries where snow and rain are tracked.

I ran the flooring within about a quarter inch of the drywall and installed the five eighth inch thick (?) baseboard over it to avoid quarter round. Across the 30 feet, the subsequent dry winter contraction and float pulled the flooring enough to expose a gap that required quarter round.

Just after our install, the Lumber Liquidators issues were broadcasted. I understand the laminated floor with medium density fiberboard (MDF) core is the focus of difficulty, but I could not find any notice or reference to the morning star strand bamboo, which is all bamboo and has no separate core. Maybe someone here can provide link to better information.

I installed about fifty square feet of oak pre-finished Bruce flooring in a closet at about three bucks a square foot using a pneumatic stapler over OSB subfloor. I found the stuff inconsistent and not uniform. I tossed a few planks too poor even for a closet. The finish isn't worth much either. After stapling, I discovered some planks were not straight. I’m talking planks, not placement. Fortunately, the boxes had enough one-foot lengths to fake in some wiggle room. Never again at any price. It requires much more work than the good stuff.

We paid a professional to install about 300 square feet of $15 per square foot top quality 5/8" distressed hickory not including installation with about 14 feet across the planks. Yes, our professional completed manufacturer's installation training, but wood requires some artistic talent. I needed to require them to work out of multiple boxes and uniformly mix the different plank lengths. Part of the art is accommodating seasonal expansion due to changes in humidity, which is why we hired the pro in the first place. No luck, we have bucking on either side in the summer. After a few seasons, this appears to have settled.

I found stapled hardwood floors provide little forgiveness when planks are misplaced and poor joints perpetuate with subsequent planks.

Friends of ours have two dogs. I believe they had high quality unfinished hardwood flooring installed and subsequently finished in place. My buddy is a stickler and does his research. I suspect they selected a finish to accommodate his dogs since he needed to point out their scuffs for me. I don’t like dogs and don’t notice theirs.

Our neighbor’s cat inspired them to replace carpets. The cat had two favorite places far from the litter box. Not only did the carpet suffer the cat’s wrath, it soaked the subfloor. The only solution they found for the stench in those areas was new subfloor. My neighbor headed my suggestion and used purpose specific wood sealing primer paint for adjacent areas. The wife wasn’t keen on my suggestion for tennis rackets.

With the carpet and floors we had replaced, I was less than impressed with either’s attention to removal. Old staples were pushed over and down, sweeping was just good enough to lay down the new stuff. I didn’t enjoy doing rip up, but regret not doing it myself more. In your case, I suggest pulling everything and mitigating odor and its source before scheduling installation.

Hope this helps, good luck and keep us posted.
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Old 01-20-2016, 08:18 PM   #6
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We still have not made a final decision on bamboo, laminate or hardwood. We are looking into lighter colors so it does not show scratches as much. I want to keep at or below $3.50 sq ft. We are looking at 800 Sq. Ft. to do.

We have 1 small dogs. How will having hardwood and not carpet compare to the amount of pet dander/allergens in the air?

I am not sure how to go about the baseboards without messing up my walls. Any tips on this?

What type of wood should we be looking into by hardness? Do we want the hardest we can get?

Since we have 2 dogs, im sure accidents are bound to happen. Will pet urine stain the hardwood, or will the smells soak into the wood?
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Old 01-21-2016, 05:51 AM   #7
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Base boards first-------If you are replacing them, replace with taller ones---this will cover the paint damage----

Repair ability is a big concern---a plumbing leak or pet pee will happen---

click lock engineered flooring is not easy to repair---and impossible if you don't have extra stock on hand------water into the cracks will often puff up the backing material and ruin that area.

Nail down/glue down strips can be repaired by cutting out the bad section and gluing in new strips---

The best bet for a permanent floor is the solid 3/4" hardwood----when those look tired a floor sanding/finishing company can come in and make it look like brand new.
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Old 01-29-2016, 05:45 PM   #8
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We finally have finalized our choice of flooring.

https://www.builddirect.com/Hardwood...aspx?bdpdp=new

How much extra should I purchase?

What tools do I need to make sure I have on hand?
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Old 01-29-2016, 06:14 PM   #9
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Thier site has installation instructions and a list of tools----the list is good, but does not address the need to under cut the door jambs so the flooring can be slipped under the jambs---

So add an oscelating multi-tool to your list of tools----Harbor Freight has a good one for about $40.00---spare blades about $7.00 each.

Flooring is not to wasteful---so I generally figure 5% over---10% is what is often recommended---so let your layout and skill set help you decide---

You can rent a flooring stapler---or buy one---good proffesional flooring nailers are big bucks---I have a Harbor Freight one---and it has been wonderful----and the price was about two days renal---
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Old 01-29-2016, 06:18 PM   #10
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One more thought----SPLINES---these are wood strips that tuck into the groove of the wood flooring---and turn that board into a 'double tongue' board.

This will allow you to change nailing directions---something handy to know when you have seveal rooms of a hallway,for instance---
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Old 01-29-2016, 07:23 PM   #11
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I agree 5% is enough. Spline, yup, you need spline. Need a moisture meter too.

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Old 01-29-2016, 08:32 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cincinnati guy View Post
We finally have finalized our choice of flooring.

https://www.builddirect.com/Hardwood...aspx?bdpdp=new

How much extra should I purchase?

What tools do I need to make sure I have on hand?

I see that's builder grade,might want to up to 10% if you go with them, also might want to check these guy's out B4 you buy, no dollar interest just nice people to deal with.

http://www.hoskinghardwood.com/Depar...d=12&pageId=20
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Old 01-29-2016, 09:31 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Canarywood1
I see that's builder grade
Sorry, I missed that. I recommend you re-think buying builder grade, not a good thing unless it's your hunting cabin perhaps.

If you want real " solid hardwood, you have to start with a realistic budget. You may want to consider something narrower than 4 " to save money.

You may have noticed they recommend adding 15% for waste, that's because you're going to reject so many boards. Which color were you leaning towards?

I was considering Acacia a few years ago for our 700 ft. project. The best I could do was close to $4 for 3 ". That was the best wholesale price I could get. That item was $4.50 or so retail. Ended up getting 4" Hickory and love it. It's a harder wood too.

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Old 01-30-2016, 01:02 PM   #14
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Didn't even realize about the grade of the wood!

We want something of this shade, and hardwood! We don't want to really spend more then $3.50 sq ft.

Can we run the wood parallel to the floor joists?

Do we need a moisture barrier since it's going down on wood subfloor?
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Old 01-30-2016, 03:47 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cincinnati guy View Post
Didn't even realize about the grade of the wood!

We want something of this shade, and hardwood! We don't want to really spend more then $3.50 sq ft.

Can we run the wood parallel to the floor joists?

Do we need a moisture barrier since it's going down on wood subfloor?

Good luck with that price for hardwood, you may find some engineered though if your lucky.
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