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Old 08-12-2013, 11:26 PM   #1
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Hardwood flooring - glue down installation - problem!


I have been installing a glue-down bamboo in a bedroom, bathroom, closet and L-shaped hallway. I completed nearly all of the installation except for half (width) of the main hallway, which was needed so that we had access to the master bedroom and bath while the floor set/cured.

When going back to finish the second half of the hall it became apparent to me that since I allowed the first half to set without marking the edge with a chalk line there is an ever so slight bow to the length of the hall. The result is that I expect that I will have an ever-increasing problem with gaps between the boards. The first 320+ square feet look fantastic. I am hoping to avoid the total ruination of the job by having the last 30 square feet of (extremely visible, high-traffic) floor look like absolute garbage.

If anybody knows how I can correct, or compensate for, my mistake I would be grateful.
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Old 08-13-2013, 07:48 AM   #2
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Explain again---is the hallway wall out of whack or did your flooring end up not installed in a straight line?
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Old 08-13-2013, 12:29 PM   #3
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Explain again---is the hallway wall out of whack or did your flooring end up not installed in a straight line?
It is probably a little bit of both. I brought the flooring through a doorway and into the hall. The walls on either side of the door are ever so slightly out of alignment (as is most everything in our home) and so, since I stopped laying down floor 3 after the first three boards deep (about 3-1/2 more to go) and I didn't chalk a line at the edge where I was stopping for the night, the boards slope ever so slightly back towards the wall on either side of the door. I pulled a line last night to see how big of a difference it was, and at the widest point (near the doorway) it is about 1/4" discrepancy from the ends of the hall.

Hopefully this answers your question clearly. I don't know if it's possible to upload a drawing, but if I can do that it might make it more easier to understand.
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Old 08-13-2013, 12:41 PM   #4
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I get it---you have a slightly wavy line of wood flooring.

Stinks, but you will ,most likely, be best continuing with the slight curve--this will be less noticeable than spacing some gaps to correct the slight bow---

The other option is to rip out those rows of flooring and get it straight---that solution might cause damage to the adjoining wood---
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Old 08-13-2013, 01:56 PM   #5
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I get it---you have a slightly wavy line of wood flooring.

Stinks, but you will ,most likely, be best continuing with the slight curve--this will be less noticeable than spacing some gaps to correct the slight bow---

The other option is to rip out those rows of flooring and get it straight---that solution might cause damage to the adjoining wood---
The problem is that in order to simply stay with the existing curve I would have to have 4-5 boards in sequence which would share the exact same seam, rather than staggering boards as they should be. PLus I suspect that would still leave me with small gaps, only they would be at the ends of the boards along that seam, rather than along the length of the boards.

I am considering dropping a chalk line along the line, and taking a circular saw just to the depth of the boards and straightening it. Then, even though I wont have a tongue to hold on to for an eight or ten foot stretch, I will at least be straight, and if I don't botch the cut it is not likely to be noticeable.

I considered ripping out the three rows of boards, but I have concern also about damaging adjacent boards, and also the difficulty of removing the adhesive. It's pretty hardcore stuff.
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Old 08-13-2013, 02:20 PM   #6
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Rough choice----let us know how this comes out---I would be prepared to rip out the misaligned wood,just in case the saw cut is not successful---
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Old 08-13-2013, 03:08 PM   #7
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The problem is that in order to simply stay with the existing curve I would have to have 4-5 boards in sequence which would share the exact same seam, rather than staggering boards
Have you tried laying the boards with staggered joints? Could be you just need to push a little (lot) harder.

Maybe I don't get it. You mean you can't stagger the joints or else you won't be able to follow the curve? You say you have already placed half the width of the hallway. I assume you managed to lay those with staggered joints.

Last edited by SPS-1; 08-13-2013 at 03:34 PM.
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Old 08-13-2013, 04:46 PM   #8
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Have you tried laying the boards with staggered joints? Could be you just need to push a little (lot) harder.

Maybe I don't get it. You mean you can't stagger the joints or else you won't be able to follow the curve? You say you have already placed half the width of the hallway. I assume you managed to lay those with staggered joints.
The floor is installed - beautifully, I might add- as hardwood should be; joints staggered. When I did the installation I had to leave a path, half the width of the hallway, so that we had access to the master suite. Because I was using the wall as a guide - and it's close enough so as to be invisible to the eye - it is slightly off.

I think that I will cut the existing board(s) on a chalkline, and if worse comes to worst I'll have to tear up three rows of boards and re lay the whole hall.
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Old 08-13-2013, 08:43 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Archeus

The floor is installed - beautifully, I might add- as hardwood should be; joints staggered. When I did the installation I had to leave a path, half the width of the hallway, so that we had access to the master suite. Because I was using the wall as a guide - and it's close enough so as to be invisible to the eye - it is slightly off.

I think that I will cut the existing board(s) on a chalkline, and if worse comes to worst I'll have to tear up three rows of boards and re lay the whole hall.
Arches, no don't cut it, you will ruin the finish on the board you cut. Additionally you WILL see that in the middle of the floor. Get a hydraulic pump jack. Lay it on the floor with a 2x4 and use the pump jack to straighten out the bow on the newly glued pieces. The last board you put in is going to be tough, but you will make it short and cover it with baseboard, and possibly quarter round. Put a shim along the wall to keep the last pieces in and face nail them UNDERNEATH where you will put the baseboard molding.
Hopefully I explained this right

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