Flooring For A New Guy To The Country - Flooring - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Flooring

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes
Old 07-17-2015, 08:03 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 9
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Flooring for a new guy to the country


I think I might just be the most dangerous DIY guy here... I am from South Africa so I am used houses being built with brick and concrete (even interior walls are brick.
I am an avid DIY guy, but there are just some things that are still a little foreign for me - so I am glad I found this forum.

That being said, here I go with remodeling my bathroom

I had a standard size tub in my bathroom, and a contactor grade vanity and toilet, all of which I have removed.
I had a leak somewhere from the tub/shower combo, so I tore out all of the drywall around the tub area, and will replace that with hardyboard so I can tile over that.

My question is more about the floor.
Under the tub, there is particle board on top of a plywood board. The bottom layer of plywood I suspect runs throughout the bathroom. The balance of the bathroom (outside of the tub area) is another layer of plywood, which had tile on it. I have removed the tile (well almost done).

I do need to remove the particle board layer because it did get wet and buckled a bit.
The tile that I removed 4" x 4" tiles, was not very level, it was kind of "wavy", could just have been a bad tile job, or the plywood under that.

I am planning to make a zero-curb shower instead of the tub and use a QuickdrainUSA linear drain.

I was thinking of removing the entire top layer of sub-floor (particle board and plywood) and replace it all with hardyboard or durock, and then tile on top of that. It seems like that will provide a stable surface, waterproof the room, and be a good surface to tile on.

Is this wise?
Do I screw it to the underlying plywood or nail it?
Do I glue it down as well?
Or do I stop being silly and replace it with plywood?

Any tips or advice will be most welcome.

Oh, I am replacing the tile with 6" x 10" ceramic tile on the floor.

Thanks in advance
Attached Thumbnails
Flooring for a new guy to the country-20150716_102612.jpg  
GreenSpringbok is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 07-17-2015, 08:14 PM   #2
A "Handy Husband"
 
rjniles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: South Carolina Low Country
Posts: 10,451
Rewards Points: 218
Default


Set the cement tile backer in thin set mortar and screw down with the backer board screws.
__________________
My electrical answers are based on 2014 NEC, you may have local amendments.

Location: Coastal South Carolina
rjniles is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 07-17-2015, 08:57 PM   #3
Retired Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Kane county,Illinois
Posts: 25,728
Rewards Points: 7,174
Default


If you have particle board on top of the plywood subfloor--remove it---it puffs up and falls apart in a bathroom--

You may need a new layer of 1/2" BC plywood on top the the subfloor---
Then a tile backer---as rjniles mentioned---the backer is set into wet thinset ,like a huge tile--then nailed with roofing nails or screw---1/4" is fine for floors---

A powdered modified thinset is what you will want to set the tiles---the same can be used to set the backer---
__________________
New members: Adding your location to your profile helps in many ways.--M--
oh'mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 07-17-2015, 09:49 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 36,619
Rewards Points: 18,376
Default


Read your post twice and it sounded to me like you think you can just lay tile board on the joist and start tiling.
Tile board does not add any strength to the floor and can not be used as the only subfloor.
Need at least plywood or better yet use Advantec as a subfloor.
You also can not have a dead flat floor and just add a drain and expect the water to run just into the drain.
Wait for a real tile guy to walk you though this.
__________________
When posting in forums, letting us know your location will help others give better feedback/advice/solutions to your questions
joecaption is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to joecaption For This Useful Post:
rusty baker (07-17-2015)
Old 07-17-2015, 10:10 PM   #5
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 9
Rewards Points: 10
Default


joecaption... sorry if my initial explanation was wordy and yet still not well explained.

No, I don't want to place tile board straight onto the joists... I figured I need to place it on the plywood - and I was going to leave the existing plywood.

I have since done a bit more reading, and it seems like it might be best to pull everything down to the joists (which are 16 OC) and then start building up with 3/4" plywood (T&G or I was actually looking at Advantec from TW Perry)

Then, on top of that 3/4" place a backerboard, but I still don't know what is best, Hardy, Durock, cementboard??

Then, my other question was, do I glue and screw my first layer to the joists?

Do I then just thinset and screw my second layer (backboard / tileboard) to the plywood?

Then, I will tile on top of the backerboard obviously.

The last thing I want is a squeaking floor, or something that flexes and my tiles crack - I believe in doing things right, or as right as possible anyway. So I am not afraid to do the extra work, I just don't want to go over-board for no good reason either.

Thanks for the tips so far, very much appreciated.
GreenSpringbok is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2015, 10:16 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 36,619
Rewards Points: 18,376
Default


Need to know the size of the joist, and what there unsupport span is before going anything.
__________________
When posting in forums, letting us know your location will help others give better feedback/advice/solutions to your questions
joecaption is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2015, 10:30 PM   #7
nap
You talking to me?
 
nap's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: sw mi
Posts: 7,551
Rewards Points: 6,290
Default


what is your moisture barrier? So far you have not included one.

as was alluded to by joe as well: you have to build a slope into the floor to cause the water to run to the drain, especially since you intend to install a no curb shower. If you don't you are going to have water running all over the bathroom floor. Personally I have never liked a no curb shower. I would suggest at least a shallow 1/2 threshold or such to keep the water from running out or pushed out as you move around in the shower and there is some standing water in the shower.
nap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2015, 10:32 PM   #8
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 9
Rewards Points: 10
Default


Each joist is 7 1/4" high x 1 1/2" wide
They sit on a wall and steel structure beam which are 11ft apart

Also, some joists are little closer to each other than others under the bathroom, I guess to support where the bath was, and then under the door they are also doubled up.
GreenSpringbok is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2015, 10:37 PM   #9
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 9
Rewards Points: 10
Default


sorry, I also forgot to reply to the slope question... I will be using the QuickDrainUSA quickslope solution, that provides the slope from the back of the shower to the linear drain the spans the entire shower doorway. 2" on the other side of the drain will be the door, which will have a shallow 1/4" track.

So, I think, unless there is something I missed, I have the slope issue. (Comments welcome! )

As for moisture barrier, I was going to use Redgaurd on my backerboard - but I still don't know what it the best, Durock or Hardy or whatever else.

My other option is just to go with WEDI for walls and floor, but that seems pretty expensive.
GreenSpringbok is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2015, 10:44 PM   #10
nap
You talking to me?
 
nap's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: sw mi
Posts: 7,551
Rewards Points: 6,290
Default


as to the best backer; I'll leave that to others but the Hardie product want to use (if using a hardie product) would be Hardiebacker which is basically a cement board. Hardie board usually is used when referring to their line of siding products.
nap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2015, 10:53 PM   #11
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 9
Rewards Points: 10
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by nap View Post
as to the best backer; I'll leave that to others but the Hardie product want to use (if using a hardie product) would be Hardiebacker which is basically a cement board. Hardie board usually is used when referring to their line of siding products.
Thanks for that correction - Hardiebacker it is.
GreenSpringbok is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2015, 06:55 AM   #12
Retired Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Kane county,Illinois
Posts: 25,728
Rewards Points: 7,174
Default


I checked a deflection chart----you are fine for tile---but not natural stone--
__________________
New members: Adding your location to your profile helps in many ways.--M--
oh'mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-18-2015, 09:34 AM   #13
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 9
Rewards Points: 10
Default


Thanks!

So, when I lay my first layer, which I think I will go with Advantec, do I also keep a 1/8th gap between adjoining sheets? This is TiG so I already feel like that was a stupid question, but sometimes no question is stupid.... Right :-)?

The second layer of Cement board... What do I put in the 1/8" gaps, or does the thinset just drift in there? I feel like I am missing something.

Lastly, what glue do I use to stick the Advantec to the joists?
GreenSpringbok is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2015, 10:33 PM   #14
Get out of the box!
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 355
Rewards Points: 260
Default


CBUs are fine but I would use ProVa Flex, I have not installed a CBU in 9 years, no reason for it, its a waste of time and money and your end result may fail anyway if the house moves.
I am a Quick Drain dealer and I have the best solution for any linear drain, send me a PM, I will walk you through it.
__________________
Schluters Kerdi Shower System, Ditra. Loxcreens ProVa Mat Shower Systems
Konecto Luxury Vinyl Plank,Armstrong and Hardwood flooring.
https://IndianaFloorsLLC.com/default.aspx
26yrsinflooring is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Tags
subfloor bathroom


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Installing Hardwood Flooring on Concrete Flooring, Condo slickwilly789 Flooring 4 06-07-2017 07:24 PM
removing laminate flooring mikeinMemphis Flooring 24 02-24-2013 10:06 PM
Flooring for hot tub room with tongue and groove base flooring. tkmiller Flooring 0 10-24-2010 01:21 PM
Installing engineered flooring in the Philippines Flt_Simulation Flooring 15 07-21-2009 09:00 PM
no glue, no nails wood flooring - little help? reds_21 Flooring 2 02-13-2009 12:32 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts