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Old 12-10-2011, 05:46 AM   #1
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Flooring gap in new doorway


Hi, I need some advice about what to do about the gap in the floor between my living room and new bathroom. I have original wood flooring in my living room and will be putting tiles in my bathroom. Don't really want to cut my wood flooring and need some advice. I will try to add some pics but having problems doing it on my iPad.
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Old 12-10-2011, 06:38 AM   #2
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The wood flooring---how is it oriented in relation to the door opening? Boards across opening or butt ends to the opening?

Will the tile height be the same as the hardwood or higher?

Are you good work woodworking or a real newbie?
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Old 12-10-2011, 06:56 AM   #3
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I am a complete newbie but have some builders doing the work but want to make sure they don't suggest something stupid that I'm stuck with looking ugly. The floor boards butt up to the doorway vertically, which used to be a cavity wall. The builder was supposed match the floor heights but it's a little out I think. The tiles haven't gone down yet.
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Old 12-10-2011, 07:21 AM   #4
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A picture would help---A lot would depend on the existing hardwood floor---If it is to be refinished--
I'd add a new oak strip in the doorway after trimming the old flooring to a straight edge---then sand the existing wood and refinish--

If the old floor is not to be refinished---I'd probably make a wood transition that overlayed the wood floor and the tile--or flush to the tile if the tile was higher than the wood floor---

Need a picture to offer the best advice----I am an advanced wood worker---some are not and may have other methods---
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Old 12-10-2011, 08:31 AM   #5
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In most cases a stone transition strip is set then the tile butts up to it. It's set so it's under the middle of the door so only one type of flooring is seen on each side of the door.
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Old 12-10-2011, 08:54 AM   #6
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Name:  image-4228101449.jpg
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Hope this helps.

Many thanks!
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Old 12-10-2011, 09:05 AM   #7
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This one's going to be tricky.
#1 Someones going to have to make sure that brick is no higher then the underside of the subflooring.
The hardwoods going to have to be removed in that area, the sub flooring that is laid in the bathroom should have been cut so it came out where the middle of the door sets, a layer of thin set gets applyed over the brick and is leveled of with a screeter made so it will level off the thin set even with the bottom of the subfloor. A transition strip is installed, be it hard wood or a stone one then the new hardwood is then installed and butted up to the transtion strip.
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Old 12-10-2011, 12:09 PM   #8
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Thank you both for your advice so far. That sounds tricky. Not too sure how to communicate that to my builders. Plus i dont trust them with my wood flooring. So should I get them to extend the sub floor first, into the doorway? Then get the transition piece? They were going to start tiling next week.
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Old 12-10-2011, 12:14 PM   #9
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Why don't you first tell us what it is your contractor is proposing before you go off half-cocked. That situation there is not a typical situation and is going to require some effort and expertise to fix that mess. Those floors should have never been built or installed like they are.
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Old 12-10-2011, 12:26 PM   #10
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Thanks for your post Bud Cline and concern, i wasnt aware that it appeared i was going 'off half-cocked'.My wooden floors are the original ones. The other floor belongs to my side return that I knocked through to so that I could create a downstairs bathroom. My builders suggestion was to tile up to the wooden floors and put in a trim. I was concerned about the level difference and I'm looking for other opinions because my house was built in 1901 and if my floorboards get ruined it may be difficult and expensive to replace.
I was aware something didn't seem quite right, which is why I posted on here looking for some friendly advice.
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Old 12-10-2011, 12:34 PM   #11
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Quote:
The other floor belongs to my side return that I knocked through to so that I could create a downstairs bathroom.
That makes no sense to me. What are you in Pennsylvania or someplace up that way?

So you are saying the brick-looking, foundation-looking thingy I am seeing (between the floors) is in fact an exterior wall?
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Old 12-10-2011, 12:54 PM   #12
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Hi Bud, I live in London, UK.

My house is an Edwardian 4 bed with only one bathroom so I wanted to create an additional bathroom. My house, like the other houses on my road, has a single storey brick outbuilding with a sloped roof attached to the side of my house. It was split into two rooms, one had an outside toilet and the other was just storage space. we planned to knock down the wall separating the two rooms of the outbuilding. Then fully brick one door and half brick the other so that we could put in glass blocks for lighting. Then to access this new space, we needed to knock through from the living room which was on the other side of the wall. I should add, the outbuilding had its own wall build against the external wall of the house. So technically they knocked through two walls. But in short, yes, the brick you can see is the bottom of the exterior wall. Hope this helps.
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Old 12-10-2011, 01:35 PM   #13
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...and what is down inside the cracks/separations that are shown? Is there a rim joist or something like that on both sides. I assume there is on the wood side but what about the other side?

And what is the material shown on the floor surface on the "not wood side"?
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Old 12-10-2011, 02:36 PM   #14
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I'm not too sure what is between the cracks. It just looks like gaps. Sorry, I'm not technical and not too sure what to call it. On the non wood side, my builder said that he was putting down plaster board, underneath that they created a grid made of wood. Is that what is called joists? I'm worried about the difference in levels.
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Old 12-10-2011, 02:57 PM   #15
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You can't look into those cracks and see what's down there?
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