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Old 04-06-2015, 10:33 AM   #1
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Flooring for basement?


I am looking for flooring that would do well in basement conditions that also a really poor heat conductor. I was initially thinking of carpet tile, though the wife is against it I also have heard people recommend against it for basements. Another option that looks nice is vinyl planking, though I am worried that it would feel cold to the touch. I did some research and found out that cement conducts heat away from an object about 7 times the rate of Styrofoam, though Vinyl only conducts heat 5 times, hopefully giving a less cold feeling compared to concrete. I see some of the laminate use a foam underlayment, is it possible to use the same/something similar for vinyl plank? I would prefer to use something cellulose free. Any other ideas suggestions, the cold feeling on the feet is the main reason why we don't use our basement much.
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Old 04-07-2015, 11:06 PM   #2
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TrafficMaster Allure Ultra is a great product for basements. It's 100% waterproof. I don't know about heat conduction. It's also a floating floor and is very easy to install.
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Old 04-07-2015, 11:37 PM   #3
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I think Allure is "water resistant" not water proof. Anyway, type "Allure" in the search box and read some comments. Some good, many bad,
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Old 04-10-2015, 11:21 AM   #4
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Hardwood floor is what I would like to suggest you. However, no matter the kind of flooring you’re planning you need to keep two things in mind – one, is your budget and the second, is that the floor should have proper installation only then flooring will look appealing and last longer.
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Old 04-18-2015, 05:45 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rusty baker View Post
I think Allure is "water resistant" not water proof. Anyway, type "Allure" in the search box and read some comments. Some good, many bad,
Actually, the "Allure Ultra" line is waterproof. As stated on website ad: 100% waterproof construction prevents warping, mold and mildew
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Old 04-18-2015, 05:49 PM   #6
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The concrete floor surface needs to ALWAYS remain above dew point temperature no matter what you install.
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Old 04-18-2015, 08:15 PM   #7
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The foam underlayment/pad does little insulating... used to level the final product. Add some rigid foam board for warm toes; http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...g-your-basment

And it prevents springtime condensation;http://www.epa.gov/athens/learn2mode...enrys_map.html

Though payback may take awhile; http://msdssearch.dow.com/PublishedL...romPage=GetDoc

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Old 04-18-2015, 09:26 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Helmet
Actually, the "Allure Ultra" line is waterproof. As stated on website ad: 100% waterproof construction prevents warping, mold and mildew
You don't actually believe that line and that moisture/humidity/water will not affect it do you? That wild claim comes from the orange vested folks, so..................?

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Old 04-19-2015, 12:05 AM   #9
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After reading that post from Jaz, I did a quick check as I am not a flooring expert, strictly curious... You need to read the fine print; http://www.mydiygenius.com/articles/...over-concrete/ Even if moisture did not affect it, vinyl is the same temp as the slab/earth under your house, about 55% average. As per my links, the slab temps are about 10* warmer (6' down) than ambient air temps, and with a time lag of about a month- due to depth/mass of soil taking longer to warm/cool. The perimeter is coldest because its closer to the soil/water in proximity.

Conclusion; need an insulation under your choice of flooring or your feet will be cold- at least on areas closer to the slab edges.

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Old 04-21-2015, 04:53 PM   #10
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I'm in the same boat as you and this is what I'm going with

http://www.homedepot.com/p/DMX-1-STE...specifications

and then on top of that we're using the interlocking vinyl planks like this:

http://www.lowes.com/ProductDisplay?...375&cId=detail

The idea being, that I didn't want to trap moisture against the slap hence the underlayment. I'm also thinking that the air layer will act as an insulator between the slab and the vinyl planks. Additionally we plan to use throw rugs in the seating areas for a little extra warmth.

I figure worst case scenario with a flood or sump pump overflow it could all come up if needed and be dried thoroughly.
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Old 04-21-2015, 06:02 PM   #11
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Dear outside,

You better re-read what that underlayment is good for again. Looks to me like the flooring you selected is a vinyl, not laminate or engineered. If it's what I think it is, you can NOT do that.

In reading the description I now am not sure what the heck it is. They call it vinyl, but they say it's 5.5mm thick. Me confused!

Jaz
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Last edited by JazMan; 04-21-2015 at 06:07 PM.
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Old 04-21-2015, 11:09 PM   #12
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Maybe before you decide what kind of floor to install, do some testing to see how much moisture is coming up through the concrete. Flooring companies will have specifications for how much moisture evaporation from the substrate their flooring can handle.


Standard Test Method for Measuring Moisture Vapor Emission Rate of Concrete Subfloor Using Anhydrous Calcium Chloride - (ASTM F 1896)
Developed by: Subcomittee on Practices of the Committee on Resilient Floor Coverings
This method is similar to the first in that it uses a sealed environment to determine the amount of evaporation that occurs from the concrete floor over a period of time.
This test requires you to tape down plastic sheets in three locations for every 1000 square feet of space. This will allow you to determine the moisture level across the entire surface of the floor, rather than just one specific area.
Packets of very dry calcium hydroxide are poured into a container so that the material can be weighed. These containers are then placed under the plastic sheets, which are then sealed against the concrete flooring.
After 72 hours the calcium hydroxide containers are removed and weighed again. The excess weight will tell you how much moisture the crystals absorbed from evaporation out of the concrete.
This information allows you to calculate how many pounds of water vapor are released from every 1000 square feet of space across the surface of the concrete over a 24 hour period. Generally you do not want vapor emissions to exceed 3 pounds per 1000 feet, although some floor surface coverings will be suitable for environments emitting as much as 5 pounds per 1000 feet. Make sure you check the material manufacturers recommendations before installation.



If your local home center doesn't have moisture test kits, then phone around to the flooring stores in your area, ask to speak to the Installations Manager, and he'll tell you who sells flooring installation supplies in your area. Those places will have moisture test kits for sure.

Lee Valley sells inexpensive but accurate weight scales.
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Last edited by Nestor_Kelebay; 04-21-2015 at 11:12 PM.
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Old 04-22-2015, 08:53 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JazMan View Post
Dear outside,

You better re-read what that underlayment is good for again. Looks to me like the flooring you selected is a vinyl, not laminate or engineered. If it's what I think it is, you can NOT do that.

In reading the description I now am not sure what the heck it is. They call it vinyl, but they say it's 5.5mm thick. Me confused!

Jaz
JazMan,

The underlayment is supposed to be good for over slab installation as it maintains an air channel for moisture to move. It resembles an egg crate of sorts with many dimples that rest on the slab and the top supporting the floor.

The flooring is vinyl, but is thicker than most vinyl. The flooring install guide states it is good for installation over an uneven floor. The underlayment manufacturer recommends 8 mm engineered for rigidity, but has an FAQ regarding the click lock vinyl flooring and states it "may" be ok as long as the slab is quite flat. My slab is very flat, and I plan to use floor leveling compound in event the slight dips.

Thanks,

Don

Last edited by ubelongoutside; 04-22-2015 at 09:20 AM.
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Old 04-22-2015, 09:30 AM   #14
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"After 72 hours the calcium hydroxide containers are removed and weighed again. The excess weight will tell you how much moisture the crystals absorbed from evaporation out of the concrete."
************************************************** *

That test is surely a joke. How much moisture was in the AIR that was trapped under the plastic with the very dry crystals?

To test with this theory, expose the crystals to the basement atmosphere air a few days then do the plastic test to see how much moisture was gained.
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Old 04-22-2015, 09:35 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SeniorSitizen View Post
"After 72 hours the calcium hydroxide containers are removed and weighed again. The excess weight will tell you how much moisture the crystals absorbed from evaporation out of the concrete."
************************************************** *

That test is surely a joke. How much moisture was in the AIR that was trapped under the plastic with the very dry crystals?

To test with this theory, expose the crystals to the basement atmosphere air a few days then do the plastic test to see how much moisture was gained.
That test is the industry standard developed by engineers.
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