Floating Floor Against Tub, How To Seal? - Flooring - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Flooring

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes
Old 04-22-2014, 12:04 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 90
Rewards Points: 83
Default

Floating Floor Against Tub, How To Seal?


I am installing a floating floor that the manufacture has approved for bathrooms.

We have this flooring in other areas of our house and I have found that it has a lot of movement between the summer and winter seasons. Our kitchen has about 1/4in movement along the edges.

I am unsure how to seal the tub to this, normally I would just use some caulking, but I am afraid that the floor will move too much and break the caulk.
linuxrunner is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 04-22-2014, 10:24 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Southeast MA
Posts: 2,558
Rewards Points: 1,630
Default


Fill the tub with water. Use a GOOD silicone caulk and fill the gap. Let it dry a few days and ety the tub.. Done and done. Ron
ront02769 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 04-22-2014, 10:40 PM   #3
Remodel and New Build GC
 
MTN REMODEL LLC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Colorado @ 7651'
Posts: 8,450
Rewards Points: 706
Default


Don't know how big your bath is.... but generally I would think as Ron and you could just caulk the tub edge, allowing expansion to go toward your other walls.

If a warranty is desired, get your manufacturers instructions.
__________________
Never stop learning (xcep fer speling en typeing)
MTN REMODEL LLC is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 04-22-2014, 10:45 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 36,616
Rewards Points: 18,370
Default


Approved or not no way would I have installed a floating floor in any home I owned.
Love it when I see customers have done it though.
I get paid the big bucks to replace the underlayment and subflooring once waters leaked under it causing mold to set in.
__________________
When posting in forums, letting us know your location will help others give better feedback/advice/solutions to your questions
joecaption is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to joecaption For This Useful Post:
rusty baker (04-23-2014)
Old 04-22-2014, 10:55 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Lynnwood, WA
Posts: 851
Rewards Points: 744
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by joecaption View Post
Approved or not no way would I have installed a floating floor in any home I owned.
Love it when I see customers have done it though.
I get paid the big bucks to replace the underlayment and subflooring once waters leaked under it causing mold to set in.
I agree, it's a bad idea. I'm curious to see a link to this product though.
Seattle2k is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2014, 12:10 AM   #6
Remodel and New Build GC
 
MTN REMODEL LLC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Colorado @ 7651'
Posts: 8,450
Rewards Points: 706
Default


I don't think it's a great idea either. JMO
__________________
Never stop learning (xcep fer speling en typeing)
MTN REMODEL LLC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2014, 01:41 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 90
Rewards Points: 83
Default


Interesting point about water getting under it. I guess I didn't think much about that.

The flooring is A vinyl click lock that Costco sold about 4 years ago. It has 1/4 in rubber backing and has worked well in our kitchen for over 3 years. I just had to pull up a few tiles I front of the sink for a new cabinet and didn't see any signs of water getting under the tiles. But then we don't take showers in our sink

Our bathroom has concrete floors (basement) so I am not too worried about subfloor damage. This is left over material from the kitchen so if it does not work I guess it will be easy to take out and no money lost
linuxrunner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2014, 01:44 PM   #8
Pro Flooring Installer
 
rusty baker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: SW Missouri
Posts: 6,619
Rewards Points: 394
Default


I have never seen the point of installing vinyl with a seam every few inches, when you can install a seamless sheet vinyl. In any flooring product, seams have always been the major problem.
__________________
The ads in my post are there without my permission. I do not endorse any of the products.
Semi-Retired Installer
Installing since 1973
rusty baker is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to rusty baker For This Useful Post:
Oso954 (04-23-2014)
Old 04-23-2014, 02:47 PM   #9
Member
 
Oso954's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Northern Calif.
Posts: 8,475
Rewards Points: 848
Default


Quote:
when you can install a seamless sheet vinyl.
In a bathroom, I like it coved up the wall. I think it looks better than cove base, and it solves potential leak problems around most of the perimeter.
Oso954 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2014, 03:28 PM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 1,343
Rewards Points: 818
Default


Well, there's nothing like everyone raining on your parade after you've installed the floor

If you go to any big box store you'll find PVC quarter round or base shoe. You can install this to cover the gap between the floor and tub. Then, caulk the seams as mentioned above. The floor won't move as much as you think and if it does, you'd just be replacing the caulk maybe once per year (but probably not near that often)
cibula11 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2014, 03:44 PM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Lynnwood, WA
Posts: 851
Rewards Points: 744
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by Oso954 View Post
In a bathroom, I like it coved up the wall. I think it looks better than cove base, and it solves potential leak problems around most of the perimeter.
That might've been a cool look, back in the 60's, 70's. My grandmother still has it in her kitchen. In a bathroom, that water would still have to go somewhere. The cove would just direct an overflow out the door, so there's really no benefit.
Seattle2k is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2014, 06:08 PM   #12
Member
 
Oso954's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Northern Calif.
Posts: 8,475
Rewards Points: 848
Default


Quote:
The cove would just direct an overflow out the door
Not talking about a pipe break or a major toilet overflow. Just the water that gets splashed or dripped on the floor with kids and/or old people.

If not wiped up immediately, it seeps under cove base and can cause problems over time. Same logic as using vinyl sheet vs squares.
Oso954 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2014, 01:30 AM   #13
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Lynnwood, WA
Posts: 851
Rewards Points: 744
Default


It still lost its cool back in the 60's.
Seattle2k is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2014, 12:31 AM   #14
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Maine
Posts: 140
Rewards Points: 109
Default


Get a piece of vinyl/PVC trim in the millworker aisle and some silicone adhesive. Cut the trim to the length of the tub. Apply the silicone adhesive to the back and bottom edge of the trim piece. Place on the tub using boards to put pressure on the trim, while also pushing down so that the trim meets the floor. This should adequately close up the space for water to get under.

I have been making a very slight slope for 3-4 inches away from the front of my tubs in apartments using the premixed Henry's floor patch and fill before putting in vinyl flooring to encourage water to drain away from the tub. Perhaps 1/4 - 3/8 total gain in height over those 3-4 inches.
MaineLL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2014, 10:25 PM   #15
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 371
Rewards Points: 342
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by linuxrunner View Post
Interesting point about water getting under it. I guess I didn't think much about that.
You should always think about water when dealing with bathrooms.
JKeefe is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply



Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Floating wall for basement pattyobrien3 Remodeling 11 11-07-2012 05:58 AM
Fernco wax free toilet seal question? masterblaster4 Plumbing 2 07-21-2011 11:56 AM
Heated underlayment and floating floor for this space? Mid Mo Flooring 0 03-19-2011 12:21 AM
oven door seal replacement, self-cleaning function malfunction YerDugliness Appliances 10 02-28-2011 10:22 PM
toilet seal, wax or foam rubber beech Plumbing 5 12-04-2010 01:38 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts