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Old 09-29-2015, 08:45 AM   #1
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Finishing a wood floor in wet weather?


I'm trying to finish my floors with Waterlox, but it won't stop raining. They say you want low humidity and ventilation. If I close up the house and dehumidify, I get no ventilation. If I open the windows, the humidity jumps up to, well, nearly 100%. It's ironic that we're having all-day rain every day now, since we had been in a 6 month drought. The next nice day won't be til Saturday.

What do professional finishers do? Fly to the islands until the weather breaks? I need answers; living in the basement is getting old!
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Old 09-29-2015, 09:53 AM   #2
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The humidity can be lowered by increasing the indoor temperature. Run the numbers on this calculator to determine what a temperature of around 90-100 degrees will do for high humidity.

http://dpcalc.org/
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Old 09-29-2015, 12:01 PM   #3
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Still doesn't ventilate, though. Today, I opened the windows and ran the vent fans to clear out the fumes from the last coat (two days ago). The humidity of course shot up, so I then closed the windows, and turned on the dehumidify mode to dry it out. Works good, once you can walk on the floors. The challenge now is- How do I do another coat, keep the humidity down, AND ventilate? Once I put a coat on, I have no access to the HVAC controls, or the windows, so I can't change it once I start.

The ventilation is important, otherwise the walls and ceiling absorb the VOC's, and it can take months to really get it all out. I'm just curious how pros deal with this, especially in places like Seattle, where this weather is common.
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Old 09-29-2015, 12:24 PM   #4
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If you haven't tried heat plus windows open I suppose you'll never know if that increases drying speed.
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Old 10-01-2015, 10:58 AM   #5
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Well, I finally got the floors done- 5 coats. The Catch-22 I had was that if I leave windows open and it gets windy and rainy, there's no way to get inside to close them. I have casement windows, so you can't work 'em from the outside (unless you put a rock through the window first). I aired out the house while the floors were walkable, then closed it up and ran the dehumidifier. Once dried out, I put down the next coat. I left a couple windows open a little, including one on the porch that won't get rained on. I could remotely operate the vent fans with the breakers in the basement. Once the new coat was dry, I could go up and open the windows to clear the fumes out. Each coat took about two days to dry in this weather, but I finally got it done. It's still raining here, but at least I can air the place out, and close the windows if the wind starts up. I'm still wondering what folks in places like Seattle do.
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Old 10-01-2015, 01:43 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SeniorSitizen View Post
The humidity can be lowered by increasing the indoor temperature. Run the numbers on this calculator to determine what a temperature of around 90-100 degrees will do for high humidity.

http://dpcalc.org/
I would agree with senior. Also, opening a window allows dirt and debris to blow in and right onto your newly finished floor. Better to use fans to circulate the air. The fumes will vent out eventually

We used to be able to put two coats down in a day if it was a small job like a room or two. Just once in the morning and then again in the evening. We usually did 3 coats, 4 max. This was in a foggy coastal town with high humidity and 60 degree average temp. We used DuraSeal. Never tried waterlox but I like the idea of using tung oil. Might have to check it out

Last edited by JustScrewIt; 10-01-2015 at 01:55 PM.
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