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Old 04-02-2015, 08:13 PM   #1
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Find high point of kitchen floor:


Tiling my kitchen floor, pretty basic 11í x 20í rectangle.

Got the backerboard down. Still not perfectly flat, of course, would like to find the high point and start tiling there. Donít need SLC or anything like that, just need to find that point
.
Canít afford any expensive laser levels, etc.

1. Tried some masonís string, fair results, would like to do better.
2.Perhaps just an 8í or 10í straightedge with a level on top? Iíve got a decent 4í level. If I went to Homerís, whatís the straightest piece of 8í or 10í stock that Iím likely to find?

Any other ideas/techniques greatly appreciated. TIA

Gary
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Old 04-02-2015, 08:50 PM   #2
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Only my opinion but I wouldn't do it that way.

I would find the center of the area, snap lines, lay out tiles, move them around so as to avoid small cuts at walls, door edges, islands, etc. And go from there. that said. Although I have tiled a few dozen rooms, I do not do it for a living.

Ron
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Old 04-02-2015, 09:03 PM   #3
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Ron- I agree, I'm going to do as you suggest to establish the general layout. Only way I know to do that.

However, the floor is not perfectly flat. With large format tile, lippage can get to be an issue mighty quickly. That's why I want to start tiling from the highest point, then I can adjust with thinset.

Gary
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Old 04-02-2015, 09:04 PM   #4
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Find some kind of hardwood and make sure it's 1x4", 1x3" has too much flex. You've gotta put the evil eye on it to find a straight one. Make it an 8-10 ft piece.

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldberkeley
would like to find the high point and start tiling there.
...And that will help how? Should we assume you've installed the CBU with thinset under it etc. and the subfloor system is stiff enough for tiles?

Jaz
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Old 04-02-2015, 09:16 PM   #5
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Jaz- Yep, joists/subfloor system rated correctly for porcelain. CBU installed correctly.

The floor is still not perfectly flat. It seems to me that if I start tiling at the highest point, I can make reasonably small adjustments with the thinset as I move along and avoid major lippage. Would be more difficult/impossible to do if I started at a low point.

Or am I wrong about that, appreciate your input.

Also, assuming I can find a straight piece of wood at Homers, you're saying to use that as a straightedge?

Gary

Last edited by oldberkeley; 04-02-2015 at 09:22 PM.
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Old 04-02-2015, 09:42 PM   #6
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Use your marbles! ............or maybe you could rent or borrow a laser level for an hour. Good luck with your floor
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Old 04-02-2015, 10:10 PM   #7
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A perfectly straight 1x4 is one way to judge how flat the floor is. Assuming you use it correctly and set it in every possible position. Mason's twine and a good helper is another. Marbles can help locate a high spot, but then what? How will you know how out of plane it is?

As for Homers, there might be a real lumber yard in your zip code that will let you chose.

Quote:
It seems to me that if I start tiling at the highest point, I can make reasonably small adjustments with the thinset as I move along and avoid major lippage.
That method works when setting base cabinets, but not so much for tiles. You could end up needing Ĺ" at the other side or more. You can't do that with thinset. You need to make the floor flat before you start.

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Old 04-02-2015, 10:44 PM   #8
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As far as a straight edge.... use the factory edge of a good ply..... 3 or 4" wide.

I always keep some around expressley for those purposes.
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Old 04-02-2015, 11:22 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MTN
As far as a straight edge.... use the factory edge of a good ply..... 3 or 4" wide.
That'l work in a pinch alright, good idea. But if you're gonna install tiles you'll want a selection in various lengths, I'd say from about 3' and up. Plus a real straight edge will stand on edge by itself and you can place a level on it if you need to.

Jaz
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Old 04-03-2015, 12:34 PM   #10
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Some colored water, some clear hose and a stick.
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Old 04-03-2015, 12:36 PM   #11
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Flat, not level.

Jaz
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Old 04-03-2015, 12:42 PM   #12
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there are some decent you-tubes on water line levels, how to make and use for cheap $
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Old 04-03-2015, 12:50 PM   #13
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Can't you just use a 6' level to determine flatness? the tiles aren't more than 2' long.
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Old 04-03-2015, 01:16 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jogr
Can't you just use a 6' level to determine flatness? the tiles aren't more than 2' long.
Sure you can, but how many "normal" people have a 6' level? Use as long a piece as you can find. I like to say 10' if possible cuz the spec is ľ" in any 10' for smaller tiles and ⅛" in 10' for large tiles. A 10' piece of wood is probably the cheapest and useful when setting the tiles too.

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Old 04-03-2015, 07:06 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JazMan View Post
Flat, not level.

Jaz
he said he wanted to find the highest point. A water level will work perfectly for that. I understand your statements but I was simply offering a means to find what the OP asked for.






jaz, have you ever seen anybody use this system?


tuscan leveling system


I saw a demo on the internet somewhere. Seems like a neat method, at least for those of us that need the help to prevent lippage and alignment issues. .
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