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Old 04-17-2013, 10:15 AM   #1
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Is this a doable transition?




Or am I asking for trouble because there is no room for expansion?
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Old 04-17-2013, 11:21 AM   #2
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You can still leave an end gap under the transition.
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Old 04-17-2013, 11:27 AM   #3
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I'm not sure I follow you.
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Old 04-17-2013, 12:35 PM   #4
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How is the transition to be secured?

You're talking about room for expansion. Under that transition piece, did you leave room for expansion? Or what expansion are you talking about?
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Old 04-17-2013, 01:15 PM   #5
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I was thinking I would just secure it with nails just like all the other boards.

How do you leave expansion space UNDER the board?
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Old 04-17-2013, 01:24 PM   #6
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Well what exactly did you mean when you asked about expansion room to begin with?

Underneath that transition, you have floorboards butted up against each other, right? Now, if you nail down that transition, you are nailing it into floor boards underneath, stopping them from moving with expansion. This is a no-no.

You want to leave a quarter inch or so of space between the ends of those boards, underneath the transition. If you nail down the transition, nail it into the subfloor, not the boards underneath.

Or better yet, leave a bigger space between them, and fill in that space with a filler strip. Then nail the filler strip to the floor and nail your transition to that.
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Old 04-17-2013, 01:29 PM   #7
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I was originally thinking lateral expansion.

I always wondered about nailing and expansion anyway. I mean, you leave some space around the walls for the flooring material to expand and contract but if you nail each board, aren't you going to restrict lateral expansion that the gaps around the room were meant to allow for?
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Old 04-17-2013, 06:03 PM   #8
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I understand your question and I don't know the answer, but as for the transitions, I would not nail them through the floor boards. With a T-mold, nail it through the heel or center part of the molding to the subfloor.
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Old 04-17-2013, 07:55 PM   #9
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My idea for the transition, if it's unclear in the picture, is to take a piece of flooring and run it perpendicular to the way the floor is run. It's not a piece of T-molding (which I would never consider nailing to the flooring material), it's just another piece of flooring.
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Old 04-17-2013, 09:53 PM   #10
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Then as mentioned, leave a gap between the butted ends of the flooring underneath the transition of a couple inches. Fill the gap with a piece of plywood or some subfloor, the same thickness as the hardwood, and nail that piece to the subfloor. Nail the transition piece into that.
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Old 04-17-2013, 11:01 PM   #11
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I think I know what the misunderstanding is. There is no specialized transition involved here. The piece you see in the picture that crosses the other 6 pieces is just another piece of flooring.

Nothing is on top of anything. It's all tongue and grooved together.

This is an idea I thought of the other day where, instead of just continuing the floor from the hallway, through the bedroom door and into the bedroom, I thought I might look cool to break up the long run with a crossing piece of flooring and use it as a threshold, actually.

My question is, is there something inherently wrong with my idea that I don't know about?
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Old 04-18-2013, 12:04 AM   #12
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You'll be fine. just maintain your expansion gap at the walls.

And as far as nails working against the expansion...My understanding is that we're not so concerned with each board expanding, but rather the flooring and subflooring expanding and contracting different amounts at different rates. And even then, the flooring nails (cleats) may loosen a bit over time, but nothing significant (unless you don't acclimate your flooring properly prior to install).
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Old 04-18-2013, 01:39 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad Nailer View Post
Name:  brad-nailer-doable-transition.jpg
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Or am I asking for trouble because there is no room for expansion?
This was your first mistake - posting a picture of boards that don't look anything like they way they will be installed. It was compounded by too little information explaining what you wanted to do.

Pro installers use a transition fashioned out of the hardwood quite often. Cut the board narrower so that the leading edge that will have the next room's flooring butted to it falls either directly centered under the door, or, in the case of an archway, centered in the opening.

This transition board can be nailed and/or glued. All the boards that dive into it should attach to the transition via the same type of T&G method the rest of the flooring has. If a tongue or groove is missing, create them. You can router a groove in the ends of all the boards that dive into the transition and router the transition board. Glue a spline (also known as a slip-tongue) in and you will have a strong connection.

You didn't say what material will meet the transition on the other side. If the material has a lower profile, you may want to buy a solid hardwood board (or pre-made transition) so you can bevel/slope the edge to meet the other material and prevent a trip zone. If the material has a higher profile, you can do something similar with a solid hardwood board or pre-made transition. Then just stain and finish the transition board to match.

As was already mentioned, make sure you honor the expansion required at all vertical obstructions (walls, pipes, etc.), but this transition does not need a gap between it and the rest of the boards because it's treated as a single unit. Engineered hardwood has less expansion/contraction than solid hardwood. And hardwood expands mostly in the width and much less in the lengths.

Jim
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Old 04-18-2013, 07:11 AM   #14
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Thanks, Jim.

Yeah, my mistake for not giving more information. And the more I look at the picture, the more it looks like the crossing piece is actually laying over the other pieces.

You asked what material will meet the transition on the other side. It's all the same material.

The picture is trying to represent the view as if you were standing in the doorway, looking down at the transition. The flooring coming in from the right represents the hallway and the flooring coming in from the left represents the bedroom. The crossing piece is cut to length, to fit the width of the doorway. As you said in the previous paragraph, all the boards coming to the crossing piece, from the left and the right, will attach via the existing tongue & groove method.

What is puzzling to me is that this type of "transition" idea doesn't seem familiar to anyone. When I posted the picture, I was assuming that the more experienced folks would see it and say, "Oh yeah. Do it all the time." And then they would offer advice on what to look out for. I'll admit, I didn't provide any useful information in my original post, but again, I figured experienced people would recognize what they were looking at.

I'm not trying to be insulting, I'm just trying to figure out if my idea has been common practice for years and years or is there a reason nobody does it.
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Old 04-18-2013, 08:43 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad Nailer View Post
Yeah, my mistake for not giving more information. And the more I look at the picture, the more it looks like the crossing piece is actually laying over the other pieces.
Maybe that's because it is? Why didn't you just lay them together the way they'd actually be laid on the floor? That's was about as confusing as could be....
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