Congoleum Acrylic Grout/Duraceramic - Flooring - Page 2 - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
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Old 02-16-2008, 11:41 AM   #16
 
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Did you butt up your tiles or leave the grout space?
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Old 02-16-2008, 12:08 PM   #17
 
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i left space for grout.
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Old 03-31-2008, 02:39 PM   #18
 
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First of all, you shouldn't be the one cleaning the grout off your floor. Call the contractor and tell him to get his ass back there and clean your floor. If he doesn't come back and clean it to your satiafaction, Tell him to refund your money. If you dont get your money, then take him to court. Anytime someone lets a contractor get away with that sort of crap, it allows the contractor to continue screwing people with lousy work. If you take him to court, you will probably get awarded more than enough money to correct your problems and it might convince the contractor to do better work in the future.
Otherwise, there are grout haze removers you can get at lowes or home depot that might work. whatever you get, id try it in a closet or behind a stove or refrigerator first or call the manufacturer and see what they reccomend is usually your best bet.
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Old 03-31-2008, 03:32 PM   #19
 
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i called the contractor back several times to fix other gross mistakes. i even asked him about the haze and he said it would come off after a few washings...a total lie. The guy lied to me about everything. He was horrible. I learned a lot of valuable lessons from this experience. If I ever contract something out again I will get a list of references and I won't be in such a hurry to get the work done. Looking back, I rushed the decision and a new floor isn't worth rushing for. I did call the manufacturer and they recommened a mixture of amonia and water with a 3M sponge and the haze came up pretty easliy. I just had big area to do and it took me a couple of days to get it all done. I considered taking him to court after the grout started to crack but I just ran out of steam. I had to let it go although you are right the guy is out there screwing people left and right. I probaby should have demanded my money back or threatened him with court. He sucked and he lied. I know all contractors are not like that and next time I will get several references before I hire someone to do work in my home.
Thanks for your post.
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Old 03-31-2008, 04:31 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by cmanley View Post
i called the contractor back several times to fix other gross mistakes. i even asked him about the haze and he said it would come off after a few washings...a total lie. The guy lied to me about everything. He was horrible. I learned a lot of valuable lessons from this experience. If I ever contract something out again I will get a list of references and I won't be in such a hurry to get the work done. Looking back, I rushed the decision and a new floor isn't worth rushing for. I did call the manufacturer and they recommened a mixture of amonia and water with a 3M sponge and the haze came up pretty easliy. I just had big area to do and it took me a couple of days to get it all done. I considered taking him to court after the grout started to crack but I just ran out of steam. I had to let it go although you are right the guy is out there screwing people left and right. I probaby should have demanded my money back or threatened him with court. He sucked and he lied. I know all contractors are not like that and next time I will get several references before I hire someone to do work in my home.
Thanks for your post.
I've been looking for info on Dura Ceramic and found posts by you and others. I note that you just posted today, but you had work done quite a while ago.

Have you personally had the cracking grout problems that I have seen mentioned? Would you do the Dura Ceramic again?
I sent an email to Congoleum indicating an interest in the product, and that I had seen many negative issues with grout and this product. I got a quick answer back but there was no mention of grouting issues, nor changes to formulation because of cracks and chips.
As I said I got a quick response directing me to their website.

I'm interested in your views.
Thanks.
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Old 03-31-2008, 04:45 PM   #21
 
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I think my cracking grout MIGHT be because my contractor told me I DID NOT need a subfloor so he laid it right over my exhisting sheet vinyl but I can't say for for sure. I have seen other people with ceramic tile and their grout has cracked. That is somthing you would want to discuss with your flooring person or other professional. I have talked to people who have issues with actually installing the grout in that is smears easily. I think you have to be very carefuly when installing the grout. The guys that did mine got all kinds of bursh marks in it etc that I made them come back and fix.

The grout does clean up very easily because it is acrylic that is one thing I love because i have little kids and a very messy husband and a dog. The floor also looks nice and is easy to clean.

I do not like the hollowness of the floor when you walk on it with high heel shoes. I have heard that laminate floors also sound hollow and I don't think that has anything to do with the sub floor. The tiles are hollow so you get a hollow sound.
If I could do it over I would go with a quality piece of sheet vinyl that LOOKS like ceramic tile. I got the floor for ease of cleaning and I think i general sheet vinyl is easier to take care of. The floor does chip if you drop something very very hard on it (of course sheet vinyle rips) and at least with this floor you can replace one tile. I don't like the hardness of the ceramic tile and that is why I went with this dura ceramic. I also wanted grout that was easier to clean. I think if you get a quality contractor or do the work yourself you will be happy with this floor but if you are looking for the look of ceramic without the price of ceramic is isn't it. The floor looks nice but it is not the same quality as ceramic.
You don't get a hollow sound when you walk on ceramic and you get that with this floor. I also highly recommend the additional cost and aggravation and get the subfloor no matter what route you go.
Above all get references from your contractor!!
Please ask me any other questions you might have.
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Old 03-31-2008, 05:01 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cmanley View Post
I think my cracking grout MIGHT be because my contractor told me I DID NOT need a subfloor so he laid it right over my exhisting sheet vinyl but I can't say for for sure. I have seen other people with ceramic tile and their grout has cracked. That is somthing you would want to discuss with your flooring person or other professional. I have talked to people who have issues with actually installing the grout in that is smears easily. I think you have to be very carefuly when installing the grout. The guys that did mine got all kinds of bursh marks in it etc that I made them come back and fix.

The grout does clean up very easily because it is acrylic that is one thing I love because i have little kids and a very messy husband and a dog. The floor also looks nice and is easy to clean.

I do not like the hollowness of the floor when you walk on it with high heel shoes. I have heard that laminate floors also sound hollow and I don't think that has anything to do with the sub floor. The tiles are hollow so you get a hollow sound.
If I could do it over I would go with a quality piece of sheet vinyl that LOOKS like ceramic tile. I got the floor for ease of cleaning and I think i general sheet vinyl is easier to take care of. The floor does chip if you drop something very very hard on it (of course sheet vinyle rips) and at least with this floor you can replace one tile. I don't like the hardness of the ceramic tile and that is why I went with this dura ceramic. I also wanted grout that was easier to clean. I think if you get a quality contractor or do the work yourself you will be happy with this floor but if you are looking for the look of ceramic without the price of ceramic is isn't it. The floor looks nice but it is not the same quality as ceramic.
You don't get a hollow sound when you walk on ceramic and you get that with this floor. I also highly recommend the additional cost and aggravation and get the subfloor no matter what route you go.
Above all get references from your contractor!!
Please ask me any other questions you might have.
Thanks for responding so quickly. I think I'm again convinced to do the real ceramic thing. We just went to a flooring place today to get some prices on ceramic and hardwood -- and the salesman quickly showed us the Dura Ceramic. It looked almost too good to be true. I did some checking on the internet, and this DIY forum and google. Your posts and some related posts were great. So, I've come full circle; but I feel more educated than I did only 4 hours ago.

As for the hollow sound in the floor, I saw a demo at a flooring store. They had 2 pieces of laminate on a wood substrate. One had conventional "plasticky" foam underlay; the other had a denser rubber sheet. They had a golf ball on a string that you could drop onto the samples. The "plasticky" one was very hollow, the rubber pad was solid. I think a lot of the hollowness is due to the existing sheet vinyl and its backing.

Funny how much there is to learn.

Thanks.
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Old 03-31-2008, 05:09 PM   #23
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Dura Ceramic offers a greater profit potential for the store than the real ceramic does. Notice that Dura Ceramic installed costs just about the same as real ceramic tile without anywhere near the functionality or life expectancy.

I just quit doing installs for a store back in January that was trying to convert every ceramic customer that came in the store to Dura Ceramic. It doesn't look or feel or sound or handle or wear or live like real ceramic tile. And for basically the same cost.
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Old 03-31-2008, 05:18 PM   #24
 
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We installed our kitchen floor and love the tiles, but we butted up the tiles and used the special sealer they recommended and it picks up dirt and stains and looks horrible. I have tried everything to remove the stains in the sealer and nothing works--even bleach or a toothbrush with stain remover. Please let me know if anyone else has this problem and if we have to remove all the sealer and start over?
We had our floor installed 2004. I love the floor, no grout but anything that falls on the floor......the vinyl tears. Any comments,suggestions on repairing?
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Old 04-11-2008, 08:01 PM   #25
 
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Congoleum Duraceramic - Poor Choice


We have a Duraceramic floor in our Kitchen and Bathroom. Initially we liked it since it looked great. Now that we have had it for over a year, it is the worst floor we ever owned! It gets dirty fast, it chipped in a number of places, it scratched easily and we cannot wait to get it removed. The floor is 3.5 years old and looks 20 years old! I did not know it was a "distressed" floor.
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Old 05-01-2008, 05:19 PM   #26
 
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No problems so far


I installed Duraceramic tiles as a DIY project in a high traffic kitchen. The flooring store rep gave me detailed instructions regarding installation and I encountered no problems. We used the premixed grout and haven't bothered to seal it--we were assured that it wasn't necessary and it hasn't been. A damp mop with warm water gets the dirt up of the tiles.

We went with these tiles because we have an older house with floors that have some 'give' in them. These tiles and even the grout have some flex in them so I thought that would minimize cracking. I screwed down 1/4" plywood sheets over a pineboard floor. Then I used thinset mortar to fill screw holes and seams. The tile adhesive went on after that.

So far, we've had no issues with it.
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Old 05-01-2008, 06:08 PM   #27
 
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I have been contemplating getting the Dura Ceramic floor also. It appears that everyone who is having trouble can be found to have had a lousy installer. Installers will try and tell you it is just like installing real ceramic when it absolutely is not.

Look on the contractor side of this forum and read what the contractors have to say.

Everyone talks about having trouble with the grout. a Congoleum Factory representative addresses this issue on a forum called FCI message Board. They were talking about a bathroom being done, but bathroom or kitchen, they are both done the same. As usual just about every professional had been doing it wrong, that's why you hear so much talk about grout problems. Don't believe me, read the article for yourself.

I personally haven't made up my mind yet, I want to look at a product called "Knight tile" first and see if it sounds like a better product. It looks really good but they use a litttle thin strip of colored vinyl (your color choice) for the grout look, I wonder about this, but absolutely don't know if it's OK or not.
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Old 05-02-2008, 07:15 AM   #28
 
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I'm wondering if these people followed the installation instructions. Contractors are notorious for their belief that "they know better". Congoleum even provides its own adhesive (much like contact cement), their own very shallow notched trowel to insure the correct amount of adhesive is laid down, their own pre-mixed grout, etc. The grout should also be applied using a hard (green colored) rubber float to really force it down between the tiles. An ordinary groat float is too soft.

Hope this helps.
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Old 05-02-2008, 01:19 PM   #29
 
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I'm wondering if these people followed the installation instructions. Contractors are notorious for their belief that "they know better". Congoleum even provides its own adhesive (much like contact cement), their own very shallow notched trowel to insure the correct amount of adhesive is laid down, their own pre-mixed grout, etc. The grout should also be applied using a hard (green colored) rubber float to really force it down between the tiles. An ordinary groat float is too soft.

Hope this helps.
They also provide seminars and complete written directions but of course some professionals don't need advice from the factory/manufacturer on new products that call for completely different ways of installing there product they just know by instinct, it's the manufacturer who doesn't know anything.
However it raises another little problem, if not done to manufacturer specifications and installation instructions, and you have a claim for "any reason" you are absolutely dead in the water, warranty's go right into the trash.
If you are contemplating the installation of this product ( Dura Ceramic) whether you are a professional, diy guy, or just someone looking for a contractor, like me, I would strongly suggest contacting the factory for complete installation instructions, learn them and then start the project. This way you will be able to know when someone is feeding you a line of BS about something they know nothing about!
Reading the post on the FCI message board (from the factory rep) should be the first place you start, it will explain why a lot of the posts you read about it being a bad product is traceable to a complete lack of knowledge on installing the product correctly, but I doubt if a lot of people will take the time to read it, after all it would take up 5 minutes of there valuable time!
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Old 05-02-2008, 01:30 PM   #30
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Sounds just like the advice I offered in your other thread about DuraCeramic:

"Good luck with your decision and whatever you decide, make sure you use the proper installer to make sure your new floor is installed correctly!"
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