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Old 12-01-2014, 05:43 PM   #31
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To be honest I did not check the floor for flatness before installing the OSB and the Hardie. I assumed there would be variation in the floor because it is a 75 year old house. I thought that fluctuations would just be par for the course and we would correct it with SLC. All the joists appear fine. The location of the most severe drop in the floor is on the interior part of the house not the exterior.

And you don't have any walls in basement supporting where the floor sinks down? If not how about adding a lolly column? Bottle jack up the floor to level? These options may be better then SLC?.... Imo
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Old 12-01-2014, 09:30 PM   #32
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If i were to do this option wouldn't that effect the layers I have already installed? I would think the jacking up of the floor would effect the mortar underneath the hardie board since it has already set. Also wouldn't jacking up the floor 1 1/8 inch effect the ducts and anything inside the walls? Just wondering what the effects of doing this actually would be. Thanks
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Old 12-01-2014, 10:11 PM   #33
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If i were to do this option wouldn't that effect the layers I have already installed? I would think the jacking up of the floor would effect the mortar underneath the hardie board since it has already set. Also wouldn't jacking up the floor 1 1/8 inch effect the ducts and anything inside the walls? Just wondering what the effects of doing this actually would be. Thanks

Mmmm.... It would be a 50/50 chance of it cracking the mortar the plywood & cbu would flex. I doubt air ducks would be harmed.

I guess your Doing SLC route best of luck!
I guess now you know other option if this was to ever come down your road again lol
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Old 12-02-2014, 07:13 AM   #34
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If i were to do this option wouldn't that effect the layers I have already installed? I would think the jacking up of the floor would effect the mortar underneath the hardie board since it has already set. Also wouldn't jacking up the floor 1 1/8 inch effect the ducts and anything inside the walls? Just wondering what the effects of doing this actually would be. Thanks
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Old 12-07-2014, 09:55 PM   #35
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Last question before I take on the self leveler (I have help set up for next weekend). Obviously when I pour the slc it is thin so it will not pour to 1.25 inches on one pour. A previous post said not to pour on top of the slc with the next bucket. How do I get the slc up to the level I need it if I cant pour it on top of the previous bucket?

Should I pour one layer then let it sit over night and pour on top of it the next day?

Should I just pour one bucket then Pour the next over it?

Just not sure how to build it up to the thick levels I need without pouring on top. Thanks again.
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Old 12-07-2014, 11:05 PM   #36
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If you pour one layer and let it dry, then you have to prime again. Add a second layer as soon as you can walk on the first layer.
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Old 12-07-2014, 11:40 PM   #37
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I'm guessing you're gonna do this job in about 3 pours. Ideally, I'd like to start at the lowest area and work backwards to the higher areas and out of the room. Of course that's not always possible cuz walls get in the way.

You need to study your drawing and plan your route in your mind. You could start at the far right and work to the left where's it'll be thicker, but I don't like that plan. You have to "read" the flow to know which way it's going.

You have the advantage of knowing exactly how the floor flows, so..... I think I would start at the lowest area and work clockwise and then back out. This will require good planning and fast work. Get a pair of the special spike slip-on thingies for your shoes or a pair of old golf shoes (for the 1st pour) and stay near the -⅛" areas. Let the first pour set up, then determine what you've got.

Have you chosen the product you're gonna use?

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Old 12-08-2014, 12:27 AM   #38
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OK..... I'm pretty sure I'll catch alot of critisisim for this..... but it has functioned fine in my own home for probably 15-20 years with no cracking.....

Assuming structural framing is fine, (mine was).... I had a sunroom that had been added to original construction and was 1.5" lower than the adjoining kitchen and just plain wavy... apparently floor joists had never been sighted....

To save cost (SLC is pricey) and weight.... I filled the floor with scrap plywood sections leveling patches of different thiknesses.... screwed into sub floor... to take up the volume of SLC necessary....

Then a NJ mud job.... screed well stappled to the plywood patches/sub floor....to tie the SLC together, then slc to level it all out..... (Looked like krap untill the SLC was applied)

Came out great and no problems.... finished in 20" porceline tile.

Just an idea....

Good luck....

(Remmember that if you go to cover that with a floating laminte/engineered product..... with that wavy subfloor, it will be bouncy... maybe that does not matter...???)
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Old 12-08-2014, 12:31 AM   #39
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Nothing wrong with that approach.
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Old 12-08-2014, 12:13 PM   #40
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There comes a time when stopping and counting your losses is a blessing.
For instance, How long will it take for the OSB board to sag and conform to the floor underneath.

Anybody in your family or friends weigh 300 + pounds.






...

Last edited by ron45; 12-08-2014 at 12:16 PM.
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Old 12-08-2014, 09:04 PM   #41
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I'm not really picking up what you are saying Ron. Can you elaborate?
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Old 12-10-2014, 09:34 PM   #42
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So I liked MTN REMODEL LLC's idea of filling in some of the space to save on slc. However I don't think I want to put wood over the hardie backer I've already installed. I was wondering what you guys thought about using one to two layers of .42" hardie to fill in the really bad areas before using slc. A 3x5 sheet of .42" hardie is $13 and covers nearly twice as much as a $32 bag of slc.

My thought was installing the 1/2 inch just like I installed the other layer of hardie (putting down 1/4 inch of thinset and screwing every 8 inches w/hardie screws).

Then I'm not sure what a "nj mud job is" I'm assuming just thinset to even out the bumps then final layer of slc to get it flat and finished.

I could be way off base so any input is appreciated.

Here is the hardie I'm hoping to use.
http://www.lowes.com/pd_60358-34299-...ard&facetInfo=
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Old 12-10-2014, 10:47 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whyjune1st View Post
So I liked MTN REMODEL LLC's idea of filling in some of the space to save on slc. However I don't think I want to put wood over the hardie backer I've already installed. I was wondering what you guys thought about using one to two layers of .42" hardie to fill in the really bad areas before using slc. A 3x5 sheet of .42" hardie is $13 and covers nearly twice as much as a $32 bag of slc.

My thought was installing the 1/2 inch just like I installed the other layer of hardie (putting down 1/4 inch of thinset and screwing every 8 inches w/hardie screws).

Then I'm not sure what a "nj mud job is" I'm assuming just thinset to even out the bumps then final layer of slc to get it flat and finished.

I could be way off base so any input is appreciated.

Here is the hardie I'm hoping to use.
http://www.lowes.com/pd_60358-34299-...ard&facetInfo=
June.... I forgot and had not considereed any issue of stapling screed (the diamond back 2x8' wire mesh) to existing hardi underlayment...... may work fine.... just never tried it.

A NJ *New Jersey" mud job is just using that screed stapled to subfloor to anchor a base coat of mud (slc in this case) as a sub base for tileing.

It is an older technique, probably before hardie existed, and before detachment became a technique/principle.... maybe Jazz can fill us in... I'm a GC.... but I still do use it sometimes/applications... with absolutely no problems.

I supppose you could use hardie as a filler, but you only have 2 thicknesses to play with as a filler... and I'm not sure I'd want the 1/4 even down on the floor....

Best
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Old 12-11-2014, 11:21 AM   #44
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A "NJ mud job", aka scratch-coat, is done by stapling lath to the floor and then applying thinset in the normal way to set the tiles. It's considered a very poor method of installing tiles however.

Stapling lath in preparation for slc is the way it's done to make sure the process works over a suspended wood subfloor. So, think the process over carefully. Remember the final height will probably be at least " higher than the highest spot of the floor. Don't just do the math and expect the heights to equal the math results, they won't. You have to allow for the lath and SLC to cover it.

Looks to me you could install about 2 sheets to save volume and some $$$. Is it worth it? I don't think so for the extra work you'll have to go through.

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