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Old 12-07-2014, 08:59 PM   #1
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Carpet in Basement


My wife wants to put wall-to-wall carpet in the basement to make it into a play room. The problem is we get a little water in the basement once or twice a year.

I've checked the gutters and grading. I think fixing the water problem would not be a small project. And it doesn't really bother us unless there is a hurricane or something.

My wife likes carpet tiles that we can just plop down and pick up any time we want. Sort of sounds like a good idea, but I don't know anything about them. It would be cheaper and more manly to get a 12' roll and glue it down. But that occasional water could make a moldy mess of it.

What do I do?
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Old 12-07-2014, 10:53 PM   #2
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I do not think, I know your right.
No flooring is going to work untill your willing to address the moisture issues outside.
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Old 12-07-2014, 11:29 PM   #3
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What Joe said. Put nothing down until the water is addressed.
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Old 12-08-2014, 06:34 AM   #4
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Easy for you to say. =P

We don't expect it to last. We're thinking about treating the carpet as disposable. Carpet is only a dollar per foot. We could replace a lot of carpet for the cost of excavating and jackhammering.
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Old 12-08-2014, 07:42 AM   #5
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Mold abatement and a sick family with repertory issues from breathing mold spores is not cheap either.
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Old 12-08-2014, 10:57 AM   #6
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Do you have any pictures.?
Also, of how much water do you get.?
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Old 12-26-2014, 10:14 PM   #7
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Okay, so you pretty much convinced me I need to do something about the water. Doing the whole french drain would be a huge project because the cabinets and paneling would all have to come out. So I'm thinking about just adding a second sump pump in the corner right where the water is coming in and seeing if that does the trick. My plan is to cut through the floor with rotary hammer/sledge hammer/chisel. If that doesn't work, I'll rent the demo hammer. I plan to go about 8 inches from the wall so I clear the footing. I'll buy a plastic Home Depot sump pit and dig about a foot deeper so I can fill with some sort of gravel. I'll drill a bunch of holes in it. Maybe even cut out the whole bottom. I think I want to use some kind of filter fabric, but i'm not sure what to use or how to do that. Then I'll drop a paver in the bottom for the pump to sit on. I'll fill around the pit with more gravel and concrete on the top. I have an outlet there, but it is not GFCI and it's not dedicated. I'm not sure how important that is. Putting in a GFCI seems easy enough, but running a new line I would call an electrician for. Plumbing the discharge tube seems pretty easy with PVC. I'm not sure about drilling through the blocks, but I assume it's just a matter of getting a drill bit of the right size. Also, I'm not sure how high to go. It seems like most sump pumps I've seen expel the water pretty high above the ground, but I'm not sure why. I'll just shoot the water into the back yard which slopes away from the house.
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Old 12-26-2014, 10:25 PM   #8
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Old 12-26-2014, 10:30 PM   #9
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Old 12-27-2014, 08:23 PM   #10
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Why not paint the outside 2' perimeter of the room, and then use a nice dimensional carpet that fits with a pad underneath so you really can just roll it up and move out of the way if you get water?

BTW, Even if you have the slope outside going away from the house, in your case you should still pipe the gutter outlets far away from the foundation.
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Old 12-28-2014, 09:10 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuckF. View Post
Why not paint the outside 2' perimeter of the room, and then use a nice dimensional carpet that fits with a pad underneath so you really can just roll it up and move out of the way if you get water?
That would make too much sense. Reread the first 3 words of my original post.

But, yeah, the downspout has a plastic extension. I put a hose up in the gutter and it takes the water pretty far downhill. We also have the deck over there, so it seems like that area should be a little protected. It's the last place I'd expect water to come in. But it does.
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Old 12-28-2014, 09:30 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathmonger View Post
Okay, so you pretty much convinced me I need to do something about the water. Doing the whole french drain would be a huge project because the cabinets and paneling would all have to come out. So I'm thinking about just adding a second sump pump in the corner right where the water is coming in and seeing if that does the trick. My plan is to cut through the floor with rotary hammer/sledge hammer/chisel. If that doesn't work, I'll rent the demo hammer. I plan to go about 8 inches from the wall so I clear the footing. I'll buy a plastic Home Depot sump pit and dig about a foot deeper so I can fill with some sort of gravel. I'll drill a bunch of holes in it. Maybe even cut out the whole bottom. I think I want to use some kind of filter fabric, but i'm not sure what to use or how to do that. Then I'll drop a paver in the bottom for the pump to sit on. I'll fill around the pit with more gravel and concrete on the top. I have an outlet there, but it is not GFCI and it's not dedicated. I'm not sure how important that is. Putting in a GFCI seems easy enough, but running a new line I would call an electrician for. Plumbing the discharge tube seems pretty easy with PVC. I'm not sure about drilling through the blocks, but I assume it's just a matter of getting a drill bit of the right size. Also, I'm not sure how high to go. It seems like most sump pumps I've seen expel the water pretty high above the ground, but I'm not sure why. I'll just shoot the water into the back yard which slopes away from the house.
The additional pump will serve no purpose without a weeping system tired to it.

Not doing it right because you would to do a bit more work is not the right answer. Move the cabinets and whatever else, and install an internal drain tile system.
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Old 12-28-2014, 08:49 PM   #13
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http://www.extension.umn.edu/environ...ions/#overview

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Old 12-28-2014, 09:12 PM   #14
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Quote:
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The additional pump will serve no purpose without a weeping system tired to it.

Not doing it right because you would to do a bit more work is not the right answer. Move the cabinets and whatever else, and install an internal drain tile system.
You call tearing out all the paneling in my entire basement and installing drains a "bit more work"? Ummm... Okay....

Maybe you could give some reason or rationale why you believe the extra pump would be ineffective?

Anyway... Here's another idea I had. If I used Drylok or hydraulic cement to plug up the wall, I expect the water will just find another way in. What if I let the water come in, but I just build a little dam and contain it in that corner? I'll make a little reservoir. I don't mind a little water in the corner of the laundry room as long as it doesn't come over to where the carpet will be. Most of the time, it would be bone dry, but in the rare case we do get a ton of rain, I could suck it out with the shop vac. That would save me tens of thousands of dollars and I think it might actually work. What do I have to lose? Thoughts?
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Old 12-28-2014, 10:15 PM   #15
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Also, I have read a lot about the slope of the soil next to the foundation, but I have seen very little about the type and structure of soil. A bunch of soft, spongy soil probably doesn't do much for drainage regardless of the slope. Maybe I could throw a couple inches of clay on top.
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