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Old 05-15-2013, 05:42 PM   #1
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Bruce hardwood 3 1/4 x 3/4


I was reading the specs and it says "to be installed on plywood only"
Does that mean it's a big NO-NO on OSB?
My dinning room was already installed with the same reference when we bought the house, and it is OSB....
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Old 05-15-2013, 05:59 PM   #2
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Manufactures's don't want complaints failures. Yes plywood is recommended.

OSB does not hold a flooring nail/staple as securly as plywood, plus any moisrture leaks tends to decompose OSB, plus in new construction, that OSB may have already been exposed to the elements and gotten crappy.

But... much hardwood, especially prefinished, has been put over OSB with no performance issues. Put an appropriate underlayment/felt underneath it

Good luck
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Old 05-19-2013, 09:04 AM   #3
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Right now, I am hesitating between laminate and solid hardwood...
Why laminate: only because I know how to install it !!! I've never installed solid hardwood that requires the use of a air floor nailer/stapler...But hardwood would be much better since it will be the exact same one than the adjacent room
However, looking at the tool in the rental center at my local HD, it looks pretty straightforward....It seesm there is not even some adjustments required on the tool itself
Knowing my subfloor is 3/4" OSB, what is best to use: nails (16 gauge) or staples (15-15,5 gauge 1/2" crown)?
Which length is best for 3/4" thick hardwood: 1" 1/2 or 2"?
How much space should I put between each nail/staple?
And globally, is it complicated?????
Thanks
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Old 05-19-2013, 05:11 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by french_guy View Post
Right now, I am hesitating between laminate and solid hardwood...
Why laminate: only because I know how to install it !!! I've never installed solid hardwood that requires the use of a air floor nailer/stapler...But hardwood would be much better since it will be the exact same one than the adjacent room
However, looking at the tool in the rental center at my local HD, it looks pretty straightforward....It seesm there is not even some adjustments required on the tool itself
Knowing my subfloor is 3/4" OSB, what is best to use: nails (16 gauge) or staples (15-15,5 gauge 1/2" crown)?
Which length is best for 3/4" thick hardwood: 1" 1/2 or 2"?
How much space should I put between each nail/staple?
And globally, is it complicated?????
Thanks
Not to discourage you at all, but yes it is more demanding and time consuming than a floating engineered hardwood or a laminate (laminate to me is plastic)...however it is not that difficult or rocket science.

Some tips and caveats:

1) Prefinished solid hardwood is easier in that the wood comes straighter and less subject to seasoning (letting it take on its moisture and heat of its environment.) Plus you don't have to finish it.

2) I swear by staples... better holding... better setting.... less splitting.... easier pulling a bad staple if a mis-fire hitting a flooring nail/knot/etc.

3) I swear by an air nailer... I'm older... and even that three pounder gets heavy for me after awhile. About the only adjustment is the right size foot (for 3/4 or 5/8 wood) and adjusting air pressure appropriately.

4.) Get your first coarse straight.

5) No natural wood, prefinished or raw, is straight. Nominal warp will set tight with the force of the hammer on the floor nailer, but you will run into some worse pieces that you put a cleat on the subfloor and push the piece tight with a clamp. When nailing I usually staple 2" from ends, 12" on spacing with straight pieces and maybe 6-8" with warps. (Depending on quality you bought, you may find some crap pieces just to throw out or cut shorter).

6) Let it season, acclimate. If raw, I break apart the packaging and like to let it have a week inside where it's going to live. If prefinished, I'm not as demanding...read the man-instructions... some are finished/sealed diffrenetly.

7) If you are one man with a fair amount of flooring to do, you may want to buy a stapler verse renting one. It is a slower process.... but in my opinion, real wood is real wood. (No plug, but I borrowed aBosh I think which was fine, but on another floor I got a "Harbor Freight" and thought I'd probably have to return it. I was surprized though, and it's done two more floor without an issue. (Surprized he11 out of me.)

8) I am not a professional flooring man.... I'm a GC that takes on my own flips once in a while... get tired of working for others... pro's may heve a bunch of great tips for ya that I don't even know. Although I've used enough flooring subs, and while they are faster, I haven't ever had a problem or a failure with what I install in my own properties.

Good luck

Peter
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Old 05-19-2013, 09:55 PM   #5
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on osb you will want to staple the flooring down, unless you have a very hardwood then you need to glue it down. I am a union carpenter, I also own my own hardwood flooring and fine home finishings company. For your purposes a 16g flooring nailer/stapler from harbor freight will be fine.
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Old 05-19-2013, 09:58 PM   #6
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make sure you chalk control lines, you do not know how incredibly important this is. Just ask my uncle who thought I was full of s*&% and had his neighbgor do his floor instead. I ended up ripping it all up and installed new at his neighbors cost
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Old 05-21-2013, 06:11 AM   #7
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I thought I would just have to align the new planks against the existing one, and it will give me a straight starting line
But you say I should chalk control line regularly, and make sure the planks are aligned on those lines and not against the previous planks?
Is this not a risk to have gaps between some planks?
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Old 05-21-2013, 06:38 AM   #8
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One thing many first timers do not know---

Splines--these are narrow wood stripes that will turn a groove into a tongue--thus allowing you to reverse the direction of the install--

Very useful when entering a room or closet----
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Old 05-21-2013, 07:15 AM   #9
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Yes, I've learned about the splines in this forum
My question was more about the chalk control lines recommended by ubcguy89...
Do I need those lines to align the planks, or my planks should be aligned against the previous row no matter what?
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Old 05-21-2013, 07:25 AM   #10
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I've never done that--or seen it done by floor guys on my jobs----not sure how you would make a correction if you found that the install was getting off a bit-----
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Old 05-21-2013, 09:32 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by french_guy View Post
Yes, I've learned about the splines in this forum
My question was more about the chalk control lines recommended by ubcguy89...
Do I need those lines to align the planks, or my planks should be aligned against the previous row no matter what?
Quote:
Originally Posted by oh'mike View Post
I've never done that--or seen it done by floor guys on my jobs----not sure how you would make a correction if you found that the install was getting off a bit-----
Obviously, we all agree to get that first row straight.... I use a combination of string line snap and a 12' factory edge piece of ply.

Depending if you are in pre-finish or raw, you will have to keep "fighting" to keep your courses straight. Remember that you'll have to push some warp out of some natural flooring and there is very minor adjustment as to how tight you force that TnG joint.

It is very minor adjustments as you go along, and yes it ultimately comes out as virtually unnoticable differences in your TnG line.

If raw, it'll end up being filled.

It's not that difficult, just realize you're not working with dead square straight engineered snap lock product.

I like my 12' straight edge better than string lines, because then I can notice very small variances as they develope, which I can't notice as well when just visually looking at the string line. Plus with a paper/felt underlayment, even stapled down, it and the string line shifts a little.

Also, it somewhat depends on the visual orientation and directional run of the planking. I think accuracy is more important when your major view is parellel to the planking verse looking accross it.
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Old 05-22-2013, 09:48 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MTN REMODEL LLC View Post
Obviously, we all agree to get that first row straight.... I use a combination of string line snap and a 12' factory edge piece of ply.

Depending if you are in pre-finish or raw, you will have to keep "fighting" to keep your courses straight. Remember that you'll have to push some warp out of some natural flooring and there is very minor adjustment as to how tight you force that TnG joint.

It is very minor adjustments as you go along, and yes it ultimately comes out as virtually unnoticable differences in your TnG line.

If raw, it'll end up being filled.

It's not that difficult, just realize you're not working with dead square straight engineered snap lock product.

I like my 12' straight edge better than string lines, because then I can notice very small variances as they develope, which I can't notice as well when just visually looking at the string line. Plus with a paper/felt underlayment, even stapled down, it and the string line shifts a little.

Also, it somewhat depends on the visual orientation and directional run of the planking. I think accuracy is more important when your major view is parellel to the planking verse looking accross it.
You can only have one control line, you set your entire floor off that one line. You can not trust your walls to be square so you adjsut your control line to the squareness of your rooms to give you your best layout. I had to reinstall the hardwood in my uncles house because the walls in the house were not square the hardwood was ran 3/4'' off the outside wall without any adjustment for square it made his hallway look like it was a fun house. I was merely saying make sure you layout your floor correctly.
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Old 05-22-2013, 10:43 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ubcguy89 View Post
You can only have one control line, you set your entire floor off that one line. You can not trust your walls to be square so you adjsut your control line to the squareness of your rooms to give you your best layout. I had to reinstall the hardwood in my uncles house because the walls in the house were not square the hardwood was ran 3/4'' off the outside wall without any adjustment for square it made his hallway look like it was a fun house. I was merely saying make sure you layout your floor correctly.

YES...YES...YES

UBC's point is very important.

Forgot to mention that your first straight course has to be oriented for the best visual aspect to the room/hall/transition .... it will determine your entire layout. (Decide where you are going to hide your taper cuts when things are out of square, and hallways really do demand a parrellel layout or they look like hell, and not hall.)
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Old 05-23-2013, 06:05 AM   #14
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I am not doing a hallway, but a square living room
And the adjacent room (dinning room) is already installed with hardwood
So I have no other choice to start against the current last row from this room, which stops at the doorway....
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Old 05-23-2013, 06:18 AM   #15
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I am not doing a hallway, but a square living room
And the adjacent room (dinning room) is already installed with hardwood
So I have no other choice to start against the current last row from this room, which stops at the doorway....
Gotcha... Basically you're saying your layout is allready determined for you.

(Not that it is your issue, but sometimes I use a transition at rooms, where appropriate, to alter the layour slightly. Just FYI)
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