Best Way To Pour LevelQuik RS - Flooring - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Flooring

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes
Old 01-21-2014, 05:35 PM   #1
Want to Learn
 
jonhayden's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Brighton, CO
Posts: 145
Rewards Points: 157
Default

Best Way to Pour LevelQuik RS


Hi all,

I need some help figuring out the best way to pour LevelQuik RS. I have a 45 square foot basement bathroom Iím building and need to add 1 inch of SLC. Iíve done a bunch of research already and realize I need to do it in a single pour instead of doing 1 bag at a time because it will harden too quickly. A single bag is supposed to cover 45 square feet at 1/8Ē thickness. This means I need 8 bags of LevelQuik to get an inch of thickness. I was planning on getting a 20-gallon trash can to do the mixing. If my calculations are correct I need 13 gallons of water (6.5 quarts * 8 = 13 gallons) for 8 bags of LevelQuik. Will 13 gallons of water and 8 bags of LevelQuik fit in a 20 gallon trashcan? If it does, that will be about 400 lbs. I can mix it right next to the bathroom so itís juts a matter of tipping it over, but that seems like a lot of weight for a plastic trash can. Has anyone mixed that many bags in one pour? The instructions also say I can do several single pours where I wait 2-4 hours between. Would that be a better way? Has anyone done pours like that before? BTW, Iíll be following all the instructions and priming as required. I also have a pretty heavy duty drill I can use, but still concerned that Iíll be mixing 400 pounds of material with the drill.

Any feedback would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Jon
jonhayden is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 01-21-2014, 06:42 PM   #2
Retired Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Kane county,Illinois
Posts: 25,728
Rewards Points: 7,174
Default


You can't do a single pour---read the label--I believe 1/4" per pour is about the limit-

I don't use that brand--however they all seem to have similar instructions.
__________________
New members: Adding your location to your profile helps in many ways.--M--
oh'mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 01-21-2014, 06:44 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Ontario
Posts: 5,233
Rewards Points: 9,384
Default


Being an amateur who has only used SLC once, I can give only limited advice, but what I will tell you is:

1) Self Leveling Compound is not self-leveling. It is almost self leveling. You need to give it some help with a rake or other. Maybe some brands are less viscous than other.

2) I thought my drill was heavy duty, then it started smoking as I mixed. Don't get the expensive mixer with the big paddles, get the cheap one that only has 1/4" rods to mix.

3) The way you word your post, it rather sounds like you are trying to raise the floor, rather than level it. Might be a better way.
SPS-1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 01-21-2014, 07:06 PM   #4
Want to Learn
 
jonhayden's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Brighton, CO
Posts: 145
Rewards Points: 157
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by oh'mike View Post
You can't do a single pour---read the label--I believe 1/4" per pour is about the limit-

I don't use that brand--however they all seem to have similar instructions.
From the instructions:

"This quick- setting underlayment can be applied to 1" (2.5 cm) thick in one pour and seeks its own level in minutes."
jonhayden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2014, 07:14 PM   #5
Retired Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Kane county,Illinois
Posts: 25,728
Rewards Points: 7,174
Default


Got you---I sure haven't the nerve to try that---

I have mixed sand with the first coat to stretch the product--I use Jifset mostly--

If Jazman comments--listen to his advice---

I would do several pours--easier to control---
__________________
New members: Adding your location to your profile helps in many ways.--M--
oh'mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2014, 07:14 PM   #6
Want to Learn
 
jonhayden's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Brighton, CO
Posts: 145
Rewards Points: 157
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by SPS-1 View Post
Being an amateur who has only used SLC once, I can give only limited advice, but what I will tell you is:

1) Self Leveling Compound is not self-leveling. It is almost self leveling. You need to give it some help with a rake or other. Maybe some brands are less viscous than other.
Yep, I have an 18" squeegee I'm going to use. I plan to cut out some notches in it to help spread it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SPS-1 View Post
2) I thought my drill was heavy duty, then it started smoking as I mixed. Don't get the expensive mixer with the big paddles, get the cheap one that only has 1/4" rods to mix.
I think I have the cheap one you're describing. I used it to mix drywall compound.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SPS-1 View Post
3) The way you word your post, it rather sounds like you are trying to raise the floor, rather than level it. Might be a better way.
Exactly! Also to embed the electric radiant heating wires. The adjoining bedroom is 1" higher due to the added subfloor so I have to raise it up. It's probably fairly level already. SLC just seemed easier than using regular concrete.
jonhayden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2014, 07:19 PM   #7
Want to Learn
 
jonhayden's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Brighton, CO
Posts: 145
Rewards Points: 157
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by oh'mike View Post
Got you---I sure haven't the nerve to try that---

I have mixed sand with the first coat to stretch the product--I use Jifset mostly--
I would do several pours--easier to control---
Thanks Mike! Several pours might be the way to go. It says you can do a second pour after a couple hours when it's hard enough to walk on. And you don't need to re-apply the primer in that case. And the first pour can be a practice pour too and if I screw up and it's lumpy I still have a second pour to cover up the mistakes. Plus might be easier on my drill
jonhayden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2014, 07:45 PM   #8
Retired Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Kane county,Illinois
Posts: 25,728
Rewards Points: 7,174
Default


The stuff is rather soupy so mixing it is not to rough on your drill----
__________________
New members: Adding your location to your profile helps in many ways.--M--
oh'mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2014, 07:57 PM   #9
Tileguy
 
JazMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Troy, Michigan
Posts: 6,039
Rewards Points: 780
Default


Hi guys,

A #50 bag equals a 5 gal. bucket to the rim. If you have help you might try 3 bags at a time, (?) but no more. But then you have no experience.....so?

I would mix one at a time in 5 gal. pail but be ready with several pre-measured amounts of water, and work fast. "RS" stands for rapid setting.

I think I would do this in at least 2 pours. Save the last bag or two for after what's been poured has set up so you can determine how flat it is and isn't.

I don't think a squeegee will be the main tool. A small plastic rake like an old shag carpet rake, even a garden rake works better. Be sure to plug any crack and dam the doorway.

OR..............

You can spread pea-gravel to make bulk and use a lot less SLC. 1/2" - 3/4" pea +-

OR............

You're gonna spend about $250 for the SLC alone, plus primer and odds & ends. Why not do or hire someone to do a "mud" job for you? Sand Topping Mix + several bags of sand might cost $40-50.

Jaz
__________________
TILE GUY - retired- TROY, MI - Method & Product suitability consulting.

MARBLE from ITALY & GREECE -PERLATO-PERLATINO-BOTTICINO-THASSOS-SIVEC-VOLAKAS-CALACATTA- NAXOS-Slabs-Tiles-Custom containers shipped to you - [email protected]
JazMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2014, 08:21 PM   #10
Want to Learn
 
jonhayden's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Brighton, CO
Posts: 145
Rewards Points: 157
Default


Thanks for the detailed response
Quote:
Originally Posted by JazMan View Post
Hi guys,

A #50 bag equals a 5 gal. bucket to the rim. If you have help you might try 3 bags at a time, (?) but no more. But then you have no experience.....so?
Wow, good to know. So Maybe I'll do 3 bags at a time with a few hours in between for a total of 3 pours.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JazMan View Post
I would mix one at a time in 5 gal. pail but be ready with several pre-measured amounts of water, and work fast. "RS" stands for rapid setting.
So you wouldn't suggest doing 3 bags plus water in a 20 gallon container? I keep reading that doing a 5 gallon bucket at a time might not give enough time to work with it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JazMan View Post
I don't think a squeegee will be the main tool. A small plastic rake like an old shag carpet rake, even a garden rake works better. Be sure to plug any crack and dam the doorway.
My reasoning for not using a rake is I'll have loose heating wire wrapped and glued all around the floor for the under ground heating. I don't want to pull up a wire. I'll be caulking and damming EVERYTHING.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JazMan View Post
You can spread pea-gravel to make bulk and use a lot less SLC. 1/2" - 3/4" pea +-
This sounds interesting. Do you think that would be okay with the heating wire and not damage it? Will the pea gravel stay put and not float up to the surface? What about the SLC needing the primer to stick too...won't that interfere?

Quote:
Originally Posted by JazMan View Post
You're gonna spend about $250 for the SLC alone, plus primer and odds & ends. Why not do or hire someone to do a "mud" job for you? Sand Topping Mix + several bags of sand might cost $40-50.
Yeah, I already figured out the cost of the SLC But it seems like any time I get a quote for someone to do something it's at least a $1000. Nothing in my area is cheap. I recently moved the rough-in plumbing, passed my inspection, and filled back in with concrete. That cost me about $100 to do. I was quoted $1800 by a plumber to do that.

Thanks again!
Jon
jonhayden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2014, 08:23 PM   #11
Want to Learn
 
jonhayden's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Brighton, CO
Posts: 145
Rewards Points: 157
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by oh'mike View Post
The stuff is rather soupy so mixing it is not to rough on your drill----
That's good to know. Thanks!
jonhayden is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to jonhayden For This Useful Post:
oh'mike (01-21-2014)
Old 01-21-2014, 09:01 PM   #12
Tileguy
 
JazMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Troy, Michigan
Posts: 6,039
Rewards Points: 780
Default


Jon,

If you wanna do 3 bags in the 20 gal, that's a good plan. I'm not used to pouring 1" cuz I would use mud.

Whether you mix one or three, you have to have the water ready, mix for 2 min. and dump. Water in the bucket first then add powder, of course.

Yea, a rake could mess up the wires, so, just pour the first batch, then you can use a metal rake once the wires are buried.

If using pea gravel you prime before placing it. However, be sure the gravel is the washed type. There's info on that someplace. I would do a thin pour, then place the gravel, then more SLC. Or just skip the gravel and just use SLC. It's only money.

A good mudman should be able to do the work in a few hours. It'll end up taking most of the day by the time he gets everything on the job and set up. I think $400-500 is doable. Another option is for you to do the mud and then tweak the surface with 2 bags of SLC at most.

Jaz
__________________
TILE GUY - retired- TROY, MI - Method & Product suitability consulting.

MARBLE from ITALY & GREECE -PERLATO-PERLATINO-BOTTICINO-THASSOS-SIVEC-VOLAKAS-CALACATTA- NAXOS-Slabs-Tiles-Custom containers shipped to you - [email protected]
JazMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2014, 09:04 PM   #13
Want to Learn
 
jonhayden's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Brighton, CO
Posts: 145
Rewards Points: 157
Default


Jaz,

Thanks so much for your help. Great idea about using the rake after the wires are buried. I'll do that.

Thanks!!
Jon
jonhayden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2014, 09:52 PM   #14
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Ontario
Posts: 5,233
Rewards Points: 9,384
Default


one more thing......

4) Use very cold water when mixing. That will slow down the time to set.
SPS-1 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-21-2014, 10:08 PM   #15
Want to Learn
 
jonhayden's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Brighton, CO
Posts: 145
Rewards Points: 157
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by SPS-1 View Post
one more thing......

4) Use very cold water when mixing. That will slow down the time to set.
Thanks! I've read that before. Thanks for reminding me.

Jon
jonhayden is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
To pour concrete ove asphalt or not to pour concrete over asphalt. murph2255 Concrete, Stone & Masonry 15 03-10-2013 08:25 AM
How do I pour an in-ground concrete tub? tibberous Concrete, Stone & Masonry 25 10-03-2012 10:42 AM
LevelQuik to raise basement bathroom floor height jonhayden Flooring 8 06-29-2012 09:55 AM
Monolithic Pour Jim Hart Building & Construction 4 06-05-2009 06:13 AM
Question on Monolithic slab - Pour all at once? seth Building & Construction 15 05-06-2009 04:36 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts