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Old 07-07-2013, 01:42 AM   #1
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Best kitchen subfloor above bsmnt sump pit


Hi,

I am new to the board and new to home ownership. I recently purchased a two story brick outside, plaster inside home. The house had sat empty for around 10 yrs, with broken windows for about the past 3. Moisture has affected everything. The kitchen floor is soft to say the least, and will have to be replaced. The part of the basement that is underneath of the kitchen contains the sump pit. It is an open pit, no cover. My question is what would be the best material to use for the kitchen subfloor? I am concerned with the subfloor becoming weak from moisture if I use the wrong product. My dad is helping with the work on the house and he has stated that OSB just isn't going to cut it, but didn't really have any suggestions. Any advice is appreciated. Thank you.
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Old 07-07-2013, 03:12 AM   #2
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BC plywood (exposure one--exterior glue) would be my first choice---

Many framers rave about Advantec sheeting--I have never used the product but it sounds like a remarkable product.
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Old 07-07-2013, 07:11 AM   #3
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Just to be clear is this kitchen floor sitting in the room above the basement, and not in the basement?
Before doing anything has all the windows been replaced or repaired.
That place has to be full of mold by now, has this been addressed?
Is anyone working there wearing masks and Tyvek suites?
I'm one of the people that rave about Advantech. Holds nails great, much more moisture resistant then plywood, not going to delaminate.
Do not use the generic version of it the box stores are trying to pass off!
Around here Advantech is also less expensive then plywood.
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Old 07-07-2013, 10:46 AM   #4
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[QUOTE=joecaption;1212638]Just to be clear is this kitchen floor sitting in the room above the basement, and not in the basement?
Before doing anything has all the windows been replaced or repaired.
That place has to be full of mold by now, has this been addressed?
Is anyone working there wearing masks and Tyvek suites?
QUOTE]

Yes, this is the first floor kitchen above the basement. The windows have all been replaced. This property had once been part of an out of state bulk property auction. The property is in Western PA, but the previous owners were in NJ. They had someone come in and put plywood up on the windows from the inside after the kid across the street had broke them, but as I said, it sat that way for about 3 yrs. I ended up getting it through a repository tax sale. The mold was in the dining room (which contains the door to the basement and stairs to second floor), stairway up to second floor, and one upstairs bedroom. It has been addressed. Thank you for the suggestion. I see Advantech is carried at an 84 Lumber that isn't too far away. I will call them tomorrow to get pricing info.
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Old 07-11-2013, 01:22 PM   #5
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I have been calling around for Advantech and it looks like it is going to run about $31 a sheet in my area. One place carries Durastrand for the same price and said that may be the better option because it comes with a limited lifetime warranty vs Advantech's "50 yrs. or so." A smaller, local company I called (I'm big on shop local) said he does not carry it and he stated Advantech "just has a little bit of wax on it," and that I would have to take other steps to waterproof it anyway.

Are there any differences, other than warranty, that would sway me one way or the other between Advantech and Durastrand, or is it just preference?

If I use either one of these products, do I still need to do something else to it to ensure it is not affected by the moisture from the sump pit?

Thanks again!
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Old 07-11-2013, 04:16 PM   #6
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You'd still need to be insulating the crawl space, so it really doesn't matter which kind of subfloor goes down. It's the underside of the insulation that has to have a vapor barrier against it. Then just make sure the crawl space is properly set up to vent to the outside.
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Old 07-11-2013, 05:49 PM   #7
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It's a full basement underneath. Unfortunately the only pictures I have are of the first day we went in, which are extremely blurry and the basement was full of water, but I will attach anyway. To the back right of the column is where the sump pit is.
Attached Thumbnails
Best kitchen subfloor above bsmnt sump pit-basement01.jpg   Best kitchen subfloor above bsmnt sump pit-basement02.jpg  
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Old 07-11-2013, 05:58 PM   #8
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Pictures of the bad end of the kitchen. The floor is soft on that entire side. From the back door to the cabinets. The other side feels ok. The room is about 8' x 14'.
Attached Thumbnails
Best kitchen subfloor above bsmnt sump pit-dsc00655.jpg   Best kitchen subfloor above bsmnt sump pit-resampled_2013-04-16_15-58-37_810.jpg  
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Old 07-12-2013, 07:51 AM   #9
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Wow--you have a real mess there---are you going to gut the kitchen?

Have you addressed the wet crawl space yet?

Any rotten wall studs or sill plates?
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Old 07-12-2013, 12:49 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oh'mike View Post
Wow--you have a real mess there---are you going to gut the kitchen?

Have you addressed the wet crawl space yet?

Any rotten wall studs or sill plates?
Yep, the kitchen is coming out. That's why I needed to know about subfloor.

I didn't personally inspect for rot. My dad, boyfriend, and his dad have all looked around and seemed to think it was all ok. I will look myself next trip down.

The water has all been pumped out and every time it rains, we go down, fire up the generator and empty it. When I first bought it, there weren't even gutters or downspouts. They had been stolen. Those have since been replaced. We have taken note of 3 areas where water is coming in through the foundation. BF's dad said, "just shove some hydraulic cement in there." In my mind, I visualize the old cartoons, trying to plug the dam with fingers and toes and new ones keep happening until you can't plug anymore.

The back wall to the right of the sump has a pretty good run of water that comes through about half way up. It runs right down into the sump pit. The last storm we had, which was just a couple of days ago, we went down and I noticed water pooling on the concrete patio that is just out the back door. The patio apparently slopes toward the house. This is the first I have noticed that. That will have to be addressed as well.

This house has definitely been one issue after another... More than what I had anticipated, but isn't it always?
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Old 07-12-2013, 01:05 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Orchadia509 View Post
This house has definitely been one issue after another... More than what I had anticipated, but isn't it always?
Yup, the 'joys' of home ownership!

Sounds like you're on-track to getting that water managed.

One way to handle it is to actually tie the outside french drain tile system into a sump pit inside the basement. This way you're bringing the water to where you know you can control it and then pumping it out in ways that do a better job of getting it away from causing more trouble. As opposed to trying to fight keeping it outside. Gather it up on the outside and bring it to where the pump is known to be able to stay working (away from outside cold, etc).

Hope your gutter (and other) thievery problems won't continue to be an issue if this place remains unoccupied, without someone local.
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Old 07-15-2013, 02:57 AM   #12
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I just wanted to update the pictures. We went down Saturday and had a flooded basement yet again. Wish the rain would stop for a while. The wood, other than the underside of the kitchen floor, looks ok to me, but I have the untrained eye. The underside of the kitchen floor appears to have white mold on it. One thing I noticed that looked suspicious was where a few boards were doubled up to the left of the column. We removed the kitchen cabinets so I have pics of that part of the kitchen floor as well.
Attached Thumbnails
Best kitchen subfloor above bsmnt sump pit-basement16.jpg   Best kitchen subfloor above bsmnt sump pit-resampled_2013-07-13_18-47-26_647.jpg   Best kitchen subfloor above bsmnt sump pit-resampled_2013-07-13_18-47-42_739.jpg   Best kitchen subfloor above bsmnt sump pit-resampled_2013-07-13_18-48-09_617.jpg   Best kitchen subfloor above bsmnt sump pit-resampled_2013-07-13_18-49-42_464.jpg  

Best kitchen subfloor above bsmnt sump pit-resampled_2013-07-13_18-49-50_24.jpg  
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Old 07-15-2013, 03:01 AM   #13
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One last basement shot and the pictures of the kitchen floor after lower cabinet removal.
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Best kitchen subfloor above bsmnt sump pit-resampled_2013-07-13_18-50-40_428.jpg   Best kitchen subfloor above bsmnt sump pit-kitchen14.jpg   Best kitchen subfloor above bsmnt sump pit-kitchen15.jpg   Best kitchen subfloor above bsmnt sump pit-kitchen16.jpg  
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Old 07-16-2013, 01:32 PM   #14
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You cannot plug holes from the inside. Shoving some hydraulic cement (grout) in the holes/cracks will not work at all. The hydraulic pressure from outside will force its way in. If you want to prevent that sort of infiltration, you need to expose all the walls on the exterior all the way down to the foundation and reseal the exterior. That can get pretty pricey, so your best bet is to do what you can from the surface: grade as much as possible to drain away from the house, and aim any gutter downspouts to drain away.
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