Air From Garage Space Infiltrating Upstairs - Flooring - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Flooring

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes
Old 02-25-2016, 12:52 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 11
Rewards Points: 18
Default

Air from garage space infiltrating upstairs


My 1800 sq/ft living area sits on top of a 2600 sq/ft garage, the bottom of my roof line sits at the bottom of the 2nd floor. I've noticed especially when it's cold outside and I walk down my dormers I can feel the cold air being sucked in to the living space around the floor molding by my hardwood floors. What would be the best/smartest thing to do here? As my overhang/eve on my roof pulls air in it is in the same cavity that my flooring is in.
CTroxtell is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-25-2016, 05:56 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 36,619
Rewards Points: 18,376
Default


Can not see your house from here so some pictures would help.
Is there not 5/8 fire rock on that ceiling and any walls abutting the living space in the garage?
__________________
When posting in forums, letting us know your location will help others give better feedback/advice/solutions to your questions
joecaption is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-25-2016, 06:53 PM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 11
Rewards Points: 18
Default


I will try to get some pictures when I get home later. Here is one I took inside my garage some time back when a pex pipe ring busted in the ceiling https://goo.gl/photos/9TVnU72VEgyTcXS8A
The gypsum board is attached to upstairs floor joist but does not extend any further than that, from floor joist to the subfloor there is 20", joist were engineered to support house weight with no supports in the middle of the basement. From what I can see the bottom of the joist sits on top of the cinder block, at this point the roofing starts and there are 4 dormers on each side of the house. I was thinking I might have to pull up all of the moulding around the floor and some of the hardwood and caulk all the joints but wasn't sure about expansion of the wood.
CTroxtell is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-28-2016, 04:47 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Utah
Posts: 517
Rewards Points: 1,036
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by CTroxtell View Post
I will try to get some pictures when I get home later. Here is one I took inside my garage some time back when a pex pipe ring busted in the ceiling https://goo.gl/photos/9TVnU72VEgyTcXS8A
The gypsum board is attached to upstairs floor joist but does not extend any further than that, from floor joist to the subfloor there is 20", joist were engineered to support house weight with no supports in the middle of the basement. From what I can see the bottom of the joist sits on top of the cinder block, at this point the roofing starts and there are 4 dormers on each side of the house. I was thinking I might have to pull up all of the moulding around the floor and some of the hardwood and caulk all the joints but wasn't sure about expansion of the wood.
I would see if you can access the area from the attic and use expanding foam before you start pulling up hardwood. I would check the sill seal between the cinder block and wood as well.
Mingledtrash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2016, 04:59 PM   #5
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 11
Rewards Points: 18
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mingledtrash View Post
I would see if you can access the area from the attic and use expanding foam before you start pulling up hardwood. I would check the sill seal between the cinder block and wood as well.
The sill seal will make no difference honestly. The roof line sits at the floor level which is also where the sill of the house sits on the block. So the air will still get drawn into the empty cavity in the wall because the roof vent is between the sill and the roof. You can see in my photos https://goo.gl/photos/W6ZYqqBn5qyj2HV77 I can crawl into the cavity and see the daylight from the roof overhang vent.

Talking with a construction friend he recommended cutting into the gypsum board to get into the empty cavities in the wall and sealing the floor from inside the cavity instead of pulling up moulding and flooring.
CTroxtell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2016, 06:22 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Utah
Posts: 517
Rewards Points: 1,036
Default


it would be much easier to pull all the insulation out of the back side of the wall than to cut open the dry wall.
Quote:
Talking with a construction friend he recommended cutting into the gypsum board to get into the empty cavities in the wall and sealing the floor from inside the cavity instead of pulling up moulding and flooring.
what about between the bottom plate and subfloor you wont be able to access that from a hole in the wall.
Another thing to keep in mind is, that for the cold air to come in, the hot air must be going out somewhere most likely around a window or light fixture.

I still maintain that your first step is to pull back all the fiberglass insulation from the wall and floor against the dormers from inside the attic and seal every crack and crevice with a can of expanding foam.


Mingledtrash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2016, 06:33 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 11,280
Rewards Points: 3,556
Default


For cold air to enter the structure, it's loosing warm air somewhere above the cold entry point. For every out-ee there is an inn-ee attempting to equalize pressure.
SeniorSitizen is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2016, 06:33 PM   #8
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 11
Rewards Points: 18
Default


If you look at the picture of the outside of my house, starting at the gutter if you follow the roof line up till the 1st change of angle on the roof. Starting from this point is where most all of the walls inside the house end(the angle of the roof cuts access off between the roof and the walls) except for the dormers. There is dead space inside the walls due to the support structure of the joist. From the attic the only thing you can access is the ceiling of the main house, the dormer ceiling has no access. My 2600 sq/ft garage below the living space is finished gypsum board. Leaving the only option to access the dead space in the walls is to cut an opening in the drywall which you could also put some boards in once opened up and have more storage space.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SeniorSitizen View Post
For cold air to enter the structure, it's loosing warm air somewhere above the cold entry point. For every out-ee there is an inn-ee attempting to equalize pressure.
Yeah, I'm an HVAC/R Tech. I was just trying to start eliminating air infiltration into my house and trying to find the best way to seal the house as I definitely have a house design that no one else has.

Last edited by CTroxtell; 02-28-2016 at 06:36 PM.
CTroxtell is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Garage converted to living space with no insulation and very limited work space! Outlawcash75 Insulation 18 10-06-2015 04:27 PM
Building out cubby into garage space? mattylance Building & Construction 4 06-08-2014 03:47 PM
Garage space to mudroom Snackattacker Building & Construction 7 04-21-2013 04:21 PM
Wall sweats. Living space ajoining garage mwehnes Building & Construction 1 07-16-2010 09:52 AM
Are You Wasting Space In Your Garage? BJLower Carpentry 2 10-07-2008 08:54 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts