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Old 02-09-2016, 08:31 PM   #1
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Versatile sprayer recommendation


I'm a relatively new first-time homeowner and could use some guidance on finding a sprayer that is versatile enough to use on various projects and durable enough to keep and use for years to come. The projects I'm considering include painting interior built-ins (my first job), cabinets, and my house's exterior at some point in the future. Is there a type of sprayer that would be suitable for a variety of tasks like this? It would be great if it was easy to maintain/clean and didn't require thinning paint (if possible). I'm open to pretty much any setup, including buying a separate compressor if needed (which could be useful for other things I suppose).

As for why I'm interested in spraying and not brushing (which I've done a bit of) - it's mostly because the cabinets and built-ins feature a lot of detailing that would be hard to prime and brush well, and also if I do decide to tackle the exterior (siding), spraying seems like a no-brainer.

Any general recommendations on a type of setup to get? Thanks!

Last edited by slantedview; 02-09-2016 at 08:53 PM.
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Old 02-09-2016, 09:18 PM   #2
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Here are some quick images of the cabinetry detail I'd like to paint. I'm not sure I could brush into this detail, especially primer, and get a good result:




We have one matching cabinet in our house that was professionally painted when we first moved in. The painter sprayed some shallac based primer (Zinsser I think) underneath latex paint, and the finish seems really well bonded and durable. This is what I was thinking of doing for my own projects...
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Old 02-09-2016, 10:35 PM   #3
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For versatility, it's hard to beat an airless sprayer. With the proper tip-size, you can do anything from siding to cabinet work. Don't know what your budget is, but for somewhere around $1K you can get a small professional grade unit that will last a lifetime if it's properly cared for.

The box stores sell some Graco units for much less than a grand, but I can't vouch for how well they perform or hold up.
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Old 02-09-2016, 10:58 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slinger58 View Post
For versatility, it's hard to beat an airless sprayer. With the proper tip-size, you can do anything from siding to cabinet work. Don't know what your budget is, but for somewhere around $1K you can get a small professional grade unit that will last a lifetime if it's properly cared for.

The box stores sell some Graco units for much less than a grand, but I can't vouch for how well they perform or hold up.
Thanks for the response. I'd probably be more in the Graco range. I do want something to last for years, but I'll probably only use it occasionally since I only have one house Anything in particular I should look at when evaluating these things? Also curious, would you spray those cabinets or brush them?

Last edited by slantedview; 02-09-2016 at 11:05 PM.
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Old 02-09-2016, 11:14 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slantedview View Post
Thanks for the response. I'd probably be more in the Graco range. I do want something to last for years, but I'll probably only use it occasionally since I only have one house Anything in particular I should look at when evaluating these things?
Graco is a professional brand, they have a "homeowner" line of pumps that the box stores sell. What to look for is mainly the pump's output capacity. In that class of pumps, I would guess somewhere around .5 gpm is what you'll get. That should be fine for what you will do with it. It'll probably limit your tip size to no larger than .515 and limit the length of spray line to no more than 50'.

And that should be enough to do what you want to do.
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Old 02-09-2016, 11:19 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slinger58 View Post
Graco is a professional brand, they have a "homeowner" line of pumps that the box stores sell. What to look for is mainly the pump's output capacity. In that class of pumps, I would guess somewhere around .5 gpm is what you'll get. That should be fine for what you will do with it. It'll probably limit your tip size to no larger than .515 and limit the length of spray line to no more than 50'.

And that should be enough to do what you want to do.
What size of tip would be more appropriate for interior cabinet stuff versus, say, exterior siding?
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Old 02-09-2016, 11:31 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slantedview View Post
What size of tip would be more appropriate for interior cabinet stuff versus, say, exterior siding?
Cabinet work - .210FF or .310FF (Fine Finish)

Siding- .415 or .515

with tip sizes the first number doubled gives the fan width (the width of the spray pattern)

The second two numbers are the size of the orifice, the larger the orifice, the greater the volume of paint coming out.
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Old 02-10-2016, 12:46 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slinger58 View Post
Cabinet work - .210FF or .310FF (Fine Finish)

Siding- .415 or .515

with tip sizes the first number doubled gives the fan width (the width of the spray pattern)

The second two numbers are the size of the orifice, the larger the orifice, the greater the volume of paint coming out.
Thanks for the info! So how do those tip sizes correspond to the max tip sizes described in the product descriptions, like .017? Also, the sprayers in the .5 gpm range cost around $1k. The units more the 500 range are .3ish gpm. Seem fine?
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Old 02-10-2016, 01:44 AM   #9
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Also interested to know from readers - would you brush or spray those cabinets pictured above (the moulding in that second picture would have to be done indoors - the cabinet doors can obviously be moved to a better location)?
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Old 02-10-2016, 08:35 AM   #10
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I bought this one for spraying the outside of barns ans shops..worked great, no complaints.just read the specs if it will spray what you want to use.well under 1k..https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
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Old 02-10-2016, 09:08 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slantedview View Post
Also interested to know from readers - would you brush or spray those cabinets pictured above (the moulding in that second picture would have to be done indoors - the cabinet doors can obviously be moved to a better location)?
I don't do a lot of spraying so I normally roll and brush or brush and roll depending on the look a customer wants. With a mini roller, you will get slight stipple and you won't get that flawless look you get when spraying. A brush can leave brush strokes, but, some folks like that "old-fashioned" look. That molding is not difficult to brush and/or roll. And, yes, you really have no choice but to brush/roll the boxes in place. Always nice to take the doors off which makes them easy to clean, sand, prime, and paint. I like to do a side at a time, lay them flat after the paint coat so the paint will level out to make for a more glass-like appearance, and to avoid runs.

P.S. I'm gonna say it and I'm sure some are thinking it, but, wow, that's some BEAUTIFUL oak. I know the trend is to paint over it, but, if it were me, I'd clean up the doors and keep the oak look. It's gorgeous. And, once you paint it, you can't go back.
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Last edited by Gymschu; 02-10-2016 at 09:11 AM.
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Old 02-10-2016, 09:08 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slantedview View Post
Thanks for the info! So how do those tip sizes correspond to the max tip sizes described in the product descriptions, like .017? Also, the sprayers in the .5 gpm range cost around $1k. The units more the 500 range are .3ish gpm. Seem fine?
The tip sizes I recommended are smaller than .017 so they'll be fine. The problem you may run into with the lower gpm's is they won't have enough power to pump the heavier bodied paints. Thinning the paint may be necessary for it to atomize properly.

BTW, the tip recommendations on the paint can labels are almost always larger than necessary or even optimal. Using a smaller tip than recommended is fine.
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Old 02-10-2016, 11:15 AM   #13
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Quote:
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BTW, the tip recommendations on the paint can labels are almost always larger than necessary or even optimal. Using a smaller tip than recommended is fine.
Suggested tip sizes work great if your name is Usain Bolt!

A .015" tip pushes .24GPM or almost one quart every minute.
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Old 02-10-2016, 11:35 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slinger58 View Post
The tip sizes I recommended are smaller than .017 so they'll be fine. The problem you may run into with the lower gpm's is they won't have enough power to pump the heavier bodied paints. Thinning the paint may be necessary for it to atomize properly.

BTW, the tip recommendations on the paint can labels are almost always larger than necessary or even optimal. Using a smaller tip than recommended is fine.
Thanks for the info. I'm comparing some of the Graco setups:

http://magnum.graco.com/products/compare/

Two things I'm wondering - is it possible I might need a .017 tip for my exterior painting? And how can I determine how much power I need for exterior paint?

Last edited by slantedview; 02-10-2016 at 11:43 AM.
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Old 02-10-2016, 11:41 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gymschu View Post
I don't do a lot of spraying so I normally roll and brush or brush and roll depending on the look a customer wants. With a mini roller, you will get slight stipple and you won't get that flawless look you get when spraying. A brush can leave brush strokes, but, some folks like that "old-fashioned" look. That molding is not difficult to brush and/or roll. And, yes, you really have no choice but to brush/roll the boxes in place. Always nice to take the doors off which makes them easy to clean, sand, prime, and paint. I like to do a side at a time, lay them flat after the paint coat so the paint will level out to make for a more glass-like appearance, and to avoid runs.

P.S. I'm gonna say it and I'm sure some are thinking it, but, wow, that's some BEAUTIFUL oak. I know the trend is to paint over it, but, if it were me, I'd clean up the doors and keep the oak look. It's gorgeous. And, once you paint it, you can't go back.
Thanks for the response. That second picture (above) is actually part of the built-in, so I'll have to paint that in place however I do it. I brushed a dresser with oil based zinsser primer not too long ago and in my inexperienced opinion that stuff was pretty hard to work with. I had trouble getting into the details which is why I was thinking of spraying the entire built-ins. As for the sides and interior of the built-ins, why not just spray those too? Anyways, here's a better picture of one of the built-ins I'm planning to tackle (there are 2):



As for the color of the oak - it is beautiful, but it's just not ideal for us. I'm really looking forward to the crisp clean look of white

Last edited by slantedview; 02-10-2016 at 11:44 AM.
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