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Old 12-17-2018, 05:34 AM   #16
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Re: Painting Trim that has been stained.


Like woodco said, “you can see the grain in the wood, but so what.”

We took out an in the wall air conditioner in our LR and had a big gaping hole
in the wall. We made a cabinet (to fill in the hole) from oak because it was
free (re-cycled) old oak.

Truthfully, I can’t remember if we primed it first. At first, I didn’t think we did,
but, last night I asked my guy and he said, “I don’t remember, probably.”

We did have have to fill in all the screw holes, (this was really old wood)
and then painted it with a couple of coats of semi-gloss paint
that we used on the trim for our LR.
Like the others said, you should give it a quick scuff with sandpaper.

This is what painted oak looks like. I know, I posted this cabinet here
before as an example of what painted oak looks like - without using a filler.
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Painting Trim that has been stained.-bf49739f-2d2d-4fa7-b94a-7fa4ea9d2427.jpg  
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Old 12-17-2018, 08:29 AM   #17
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Re: Painting Trim that has been stained.


Quote:
Originally Posted by lenaitch View Post
But I think that's the point. If you want trim with a smooth surface, you have to fill and sand. If having the grain show through is what you want - or are okay with - then prime and paint. I personally don't like the look of painted oak, but to each their own.
In the last few years I have done at least 20 cabinet jobs turning stained and finished oak into white paint, and not one of them cared that you could still see the grain. I offered to grain fill, but noone thinks its worth the extra time and cost.

If you noticed, the OP didnt say anything about wanting them perfectly smooth and grain free. If thats the case, replace, but since he stated he's trying to save a few bucks, I think goes to show that he can live with the grain.
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Last edited by woodco; 12-17-2018 at 08:32 AM.
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Old 12-17-2018, 08:34 AM   #18
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Re: Painting Trim that has been stained.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Two Knots View Post
Like woodco said, “you can see the grain in the wood, but so what.”

We took out an in the wall air conditioner in our LR and had a big gaping hole
in the wall. We made a cabinet (to fill in the hole) from oak because it was
free (re-cycled) old oak.

Truthfully, I can’t remember if we primed it first. At first, I didn’t think we did,
but, last night I asked my guy and he said, “I don’t remember, probably.”

We did have have to fill in all the screw holes, (this was really old wood)
and then painted it with a couple of coats of semi-gloss paint
that we used on the trim for our LR.
Like the others said, you should give it a quick scuff with sandpaper.

This is what painted oak looks like. I know, I posted this cabinet here
before as an example of what painted oak looks like - without using a filler.
When I do that, (granted, Im spraying) First, I prime and backbrush with BIN. THis works the primer in the grain. Then, I sand that, and spray a nice thick coat of a latex undercoater. This gives it some build, and gets more in the grain. Then I sand that, and spray two topcoats. The end result still shows grain, but quite a bit less than that picture.
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Old 12-20-2018, 09:54 AM   #19
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Re: Painting Trim that has been stained.


The trim that I sanded down and painted looks fine(my wife was happy) except for the fact that I used ceiling paint and no primer. The adherence and texture are fine but the flat doesn't look so good and it seems to absorb and show every speck of dirt that comes near it. I and going to test out a coat of primer and a coat or two of the trim paint we used on the pre primed pine trim we have. If it looks bad I will replace the trim.I will let you know what happens.

Thanks for sharing your knowledge.
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Old 12-20-2018, 10:36 AM   #20
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Re: Painting Trim that has been stained.


I'd be surprised if the ceiling paint stays adhered to the poly/varnish long term. There is a reason flat paint is never used for trim - it's not washable and by it's nature will attract dirt/grime. You want to use enamel for the finish coat - any sheen will do fine.
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Old 12-23-2018, 04:38 AM   #21
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Re: Painting Trim that has been stained.


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I actually have a vested interest in the outcome of your experiment. I was thinking of buying a house to flip and it is all stained woodwork - windows, window/door casing, chair rail, etc. My plan was to paint it all. Replacing it would be a much bigger investment of time and money.

Did you put u put a coat or 2 of paint on it after sanding?
You want to be very careful here. The housing market is getting a little softer which means that the buyers aren't as frantic as they were this summer. People are no longer going to be taken in by a quick paint job.

If the trim in the place is good, fine grained hickory or something like that which is in good shape and intended for staining then think long and hard before messing with it. If it's cheap pine or has crazed grain then your fine to cover it up or just replace with MDF.

We were house shopping this summer and most of the homes that we rejected due to what I call "poor bones" (they might have looked slick on the surface but there were fundamental issues that had been glossed over by the seller) remained on the market many months after we looked at them. And most houses we looked at had been repainted and filled with staged furniture. You can kind of assume that just about everything on the market these days is "flipped" or has been attacked by the painters because the seller wants to collect the premium that a flipper would get. What wasn't looking this way was stuff requiring serious work. (foreclosures with rotted out decks or roofs or suchlike.) and even that stuff was on the market a while due to unrealistic sellers.

I saw very few homes that simply just looked dated on the inside.

The home we ultimately bought has all stained wood trim in it and that was a selling point to us.
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Old 12-23-2018, 02:24 PM   #22
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Re: Painting Trim that has been stained.


Degloss (Acetone or real degloss) so your fill will stick in the nooks and crannies
Fill.
Sand.
Degloss. (Yes, again to remove fill sheen).

Prime with something close to the final color you want.
Paint.
Paint. (Yes, also again - two coats are what a pro does, especially over dark stain - don't believe the hype about "ONE Coat Primer and Final!" Those claims are made by marketeers that have never painted and been paid for it).
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Old 01-06-2019, 01:17 PM   #23
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Re: Painting Trim that has been stained.


The holidays slowed me down but I am back at it now. I thought I would show some more pictures and explain what I am doing and why.

I had painted some of this trim 10 years ago. I had a neighbor that was a professional painter. He painted his trim and it looked great. I asked him how he did it and I thought he said two coats of Kilz. I painted the trim in my bathroom with two coats of Kilz and it looks bad. He laughed at me but never told me how he really did it.



Yesterday I washed it with some TSP, rinsed it, and let it dry. I painted it with two coats of trim paint. I think it looks good.



The question was asked, why would I paint over Oak. My wife never liked the dark wood.Recently we took out the carpeting and installed hardwood. We also rebuilt the staircase. It is Red Oak with clear coat. Rather than sand down all of the dark stain stuff(some of it was trashed as well) I took it out. We are replacing the baseboard with clear coated red oak. She wants the door trim to be painted and not natural wood. I thought I could save money by repainting the existing door trim. The door itself is another story. I am going to paint one as an experiment. The jury will be out on that!
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Old 01-06-2019, 01:40 PM   #24
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Re: Painting Trim that has been stained.


I suggest not using TSP. While it does a good job cleaning, it sometimes leaves a residue that paint wont adhere to. Its best just to use something else. I use simple green or krud cutter myself.

That door looks like fake wood to me, (plastic) so be sure to use a good bonding primer. BIN, or STIX or something.

Oh, and caulk them cracks and give the trim another coat, for crying out loud. The paint looks good, those cracks look like dog poopy.

If you do anymore trim, caulk after your prime coat.
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Last edited by woodco; 01-06-2019 at 01:43 PM.
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Old 01-06-2019, 01:58 PM   #25
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Re: Painting Trim that has been stained.


I agree, caulking the woodwork will make the job look more professional. I only use TSP on the exterior where I can rinse with my pressure washer.


2 coats of Kilz ?? I question your neighbor's professionalism.
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Old 01-06-2019, 02:12 PM   #26
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Re: Painting Trim that has been stained.


Quote:
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2 coats of Kilz ?? I question your neighbor's professionalism.
It was me misunderstanding him.
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Old 01-06-2019, 02:15 PM   #27
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Re: Painting Trim that has been stained.


Quote:
Originally Posted by woodco View Post
I suggest not using TSP. While it does a good job cleaning, it sometimes leaves a residue that paint wont adhere to. Its best just to use something else. I use simple green or krud cutter myself.

That door looks like fake wood to me, (plastic) so be sure to use a good bonding primer. BIN, or STIX or something.

Oh, and caulk them cracks and give the trim another coat, for crying out loud. The paint looks good, those cracks look like dog poopy.

If you do anymore trim, caulk after your prime coat.
I used to use Soilex all the time but I couldn't find any and the guy at the big box store said TSP is better...

I agree that the crack looks bad. What type of caulk should I use?
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Old 01-06-2019, 02:19 PM   #28
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Re: Painting Trim that has been stained.


Most any quality silconized acrylic latex caulk will work. White Lightning is my preferred brand.
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Old 01-06-2019, 02:29 PM   #29
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Re: Painting Trim that has been stained.


You meant just the "crack" between the miter's or the crack on the inside as well?
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Old 01-06-2019, 02:35 PM   #30
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Re: Painting Trim that has been stained.


all the cracks. When I do trim, I will often recaulk corners even if they dont look like they need it. Paint might fill the crack for now, but will likely crack later on.

Personally, I really only clean the obviously dirty areas, and around doorknobs, but its obviously better to do a thorough cleaning. Any kitchen cleaner/degreaser will do the job. TSP is usually overkill, and leaves a film if not rinsed very well. I'd rather just save myself the trouble and use something easier to deal with.
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Last edited by woodco; 01-06-2019 at 02:41 PM.
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