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Old 12-23-2018, 04:20 PM   #16
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Re: Brushes, what do the pro's use?


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Originally Posted by mark sr View Post
It depends on the coating and brush used along with the skill of the applicator ..... although latex isn't as forgiving as oil.
I have to disagree strongly with this.

Last edited by tmittelstaedt; 12-23-2018 at 04:37 PM.
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Old 12-23-2018, 04:35 PM   #17
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Re: Brushes, what do the pro's use?


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Originally Posted by mark sr View Post
It depends on the coating and brush used along with the skill of the applicator ..... although latex isn't as forgiving as oil.
I have to disagree strongly with this. I've painted oil based lacquer in 55 degree temps using the crappiest cheapest roughest bristled brush I could find and let it dry overnight and had a surface smooth as glass with zero brush marks. I've also done the same trick with the best brush on the market using latex housepaint and gotten brush marks.

It is all in the "goopieness" of the paint and how fast it dries. Temperature makes a huge difference as well. When I roll paint interior walls I put the furnace up to 80 degrees if I can get it. If the paint is drying quickly then it's just a matter of getting used to the paint and how much you can get on the wall before it's too thick to prevent it from running and sagging. The hotter the temp and the thicker the paint in general the thicker you can lay it down without sags and runs and if you can lay it down thick it's going to cover better.

For trim painting no matter what thinness or thickness of latex used none of them I've come across seem to have a sufficiently long enough drying time no matter what I do with the temperature or how thick or thin it's applied to have enough time for the paint film to smooth out unless it's sprayed. My experience has been that oil based trim paint will setup a proper film when brushed if you give it enough time but not latex. And with oil the brush is not nearly as important as the temperature. Perhaps in a marginal situation the brush matters but in my experience it's minor compared to other factors.

The problem I think is that people want to believe they can buy cheap paint and overcome it's shortcomings with an expensive brush.
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Old 12-23-2018, 05:24 PM   #18
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Re: Brushes, what do the pro's use?


You say you strongly disagree, yet you basically state the same points he made....
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Old 12-23-2018, 06:13 PM   #19
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Re: Brushes, what do the pro's use?


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I am game to try them but don't remember if they are from Lowes or Homely Depot?
Home Depot, @chrisn . Your favorite store after SW.
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Old 12-23-2018, 06:38 PM   #20
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Re: Brushes, what do the pro's use?


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You say you strongly disagree, yet you basically state the same points he made....
He made like 4 points in the same sentence - I am only disagreeing with one of them - the importance of the brush - which I think is pretty close to zero.

Like I said I think the drivers of the expensive brushes are the desire to find a magic spell to change paint lead into paint gold . and once you are done with the job you can never get them as perfectly clean as when they were new so they are never going to be as good as when they were unused...

It's like the people who buy fart cans for their cars thinking they are getting an "extra 5hp" - you can't change a Pinto into a Mustang with a $20 accessory anymore than you can change a $12 a can paint into a $30 a can paint with a $20 brush...
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Old 12-23-2018, 06:42 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tmittelstaedt View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodco View Post
You say you strongly disagree, yet you basically state the same points he made....
He made like 4 points in the same sentence - I am only disagreeing with one of them - the importance of the brush - which I think is pretty close to zero.

Like I said I think the drivers of the expensive brushes are the desire to find a magic spell to change paint lead into paint gold . and once you are done with the job you can never get them as perfectly clean as when they were new so they are never going to be as good as when they were unused...

It's like the people who buy fart cans for their cars thinking they are getting an "extra 5hp" - you can't change a Pinto into a Mustang with a $20 accessory anymore than you can change a $12 a can paint into a $30 a can paint with a $20 brush...
Yeah your right on the money come keep buying more cheap brushe!. They last 1/2 as long and I have a higher markup on them. I don't mind at all when guys give me more moneys.
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Old 12-24-2018, 05:10 AM   #22
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Re: Brushes, what do the pro's use?


I've painted all my life and I'm as good or better than most with a brush but I'd be hard put to do a decent job with an inferior brush. I've applied ultra cheap paint [as an employee], some of the best paints and all the grades in between. The main things in applying paint without brush marks is knowing the particular coating you are using along with a good brush and experience.
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Old 12-24-2018, 05:20 AM   #23
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Re: Brushes, what do the pro's use?


I consider my self an amature painter. Painted about seven houses over the years and even I can tell the difference between a high end vs cheap brush. Quality usually reveals itself when you are painting detailed areas, like windows.
I am not brand loyal, but my favorite brush is a Purdy.

Went down to my son's home the other day to help him paint a room and I was on "correction" touch up when helping him finish up. He had a cheap brush and it was very difficult to lay a line. Went home and got my favorite Purdy and I was back in the saddle.
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Old 12-24-2018, 08:36 AM   #24
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Re: Brushes, what do the pro's use?


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Home Depot, @chrisn . Your favorite store after SW.
don't forget wallmart!
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Old 12-24-2018, 01:06 PM   #25
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Re: Brushes, what do the pro's use?


Merry Christmas, made it to the new house today, the paint I am using is B.M advance with a little flood, and a stiff purdy. I am not a pro painter but know a great job when I see one, if it was the rental house I would not care about brush marks, but it is new construction. So you think a soft brush will work better? thanks
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Old 12-24-2018, 02:48 PM   #26
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Re: Brushes, what do the pro's use?


Yodaman and the roller, I usually do the same. Usually buy 9" rollers and cut them into 2 or 3?, trim the messed up fur and vacuum clean to fit 2 or 3" rollers, forget which. Could be 2.5. I think there's little bit left over.

Cutting the trim edges first and feathering the paint edge, then the trim faces with the roller. Then back brush with soft split end angled brush. Too quick this way to set up. If the paint's been sitting awhile, thin a bit with flood acrylic paint thinner.
I usually have to do 2 coats for trim and maybe even 3 for doors. I don't see brush marks.
Short fur pads work but leave too thin film. If tried too thick, it either runs somewhere or leaves marks. It didn't work for cutting a clean edge for me.
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Old 12-24-2018, 05:37 PM   #27
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Merry Christmas, made it to the new house today, the paint I am using is B.M advance with a little flood, and a stiff purdy. I am not a pro painter but know a great job when I see one, if it was the rental house I would not care about brush marks, but it is new construction. So you think a soft brush will work better? thanks
Stiff purdy will leave brush marks for sure with advance. Don't use floetrol. Not compatible with advance. Use clean room temp water or xim extender. Thin coats putting the material on quickly then lay it out. Don't play with it too much.
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Old 12-25-2018, 11:21 AM   #28
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Re: Brushes, what do the pro's use?


Also, a soft bristle brush will leave less brush marks. If the trim is flat, use a 3/16" mohair or similar roller instead, with a little XIM extender. Do that right, and it will look sprayed. It needs to be very thin, or it will run.
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Old 12-26-2018, 11:31 AM   #29
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Re: Brushes, what do the pro's use?


Once the brush is built to quality standards, it comes down to the attributes of the paint you're using and personal preference. Brand is of less importance.

Of the brushes I've tried, Corona is my least favorite and Wooster probably my go to, since they make so many styles and one of them usually fits the job. So many of the Purdy brushes are too thin and don't hold enough paint in the well. Stiffer brushes for thicker paints, especially interior. My favorite brush for getting really crisp lines is a Picasso. In the Wooster line pick the style that fits what you're looking for. Thinner paints and fewer brush marks? Nylon. Easier cleaning? Chinex. Thicker paints? Polyester or polyester blend. Oil based paint? Natural bristle (actually I hardly ever use natural bristle, but don't use it for water based paint. Even for oil, the artificials works fine.)
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Old 12-26-2018, 11:38 AM   #30
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Re: Brushes, what do the pro's use?


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Originally Posted by tmittelstaedt View Post
It is all in the "goopieness" of the paint and how fast it dries. Temperature makes a huge difference as well. When I roll paint interior walls I put the furnace up to 80 degrees if I can get it. If the paint is drying quickly then it's just a matter of getting used to the paint and how much you can get on the wall before it's too thick to prevent it from running and sagging. The hotter the temp and the thicker the paint in general the thicker you can lay it down without sags and runs and if you can lay it down thick it's going to cover better.

This is true but it's a double edged sword. I think for a homeowner DIYer, the fast drying time is going to hurt them because the working time is so low that they have to get it perfect on the first pass really. I think a homeowner would be better off using a higher solids, higher hiding paint such as PPG Timeless or something along those lines if they want to get one coat, and then they can just put on a medium-thick coat without running the risk of sagging. And yes, you can get fine results in one coat with some modern paints such as this (cutting in might take 2 coats depending on your skill level). Otherwise, they are probably better off just putting on 2 coats. Not to mention the fact that working in a hot environment just sucks. In fact, with the heat, the smell of the paint, going up and down the stepladder, and cocking my head up toward the ceiling for cutting in the top, tends to make me nauseous.
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