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Drachenfire 04-13-2019 10:35 AM

Uncommon vintage tools
 
3 Attachment(s)
Many of us have tools handed down to us from out fathers or even grandfathers. These are mostly hand tools used in the most common vocational trades, carpentry, woodworking, automotive etc. I myself have planes and hand saws that are literally older than I am (I am well into my 50s).

There are a plethora of websites that exhibit these tools.

What about the more uncommon tools?

Part of my working life, I was in telco. Today we see phone people running around in bucket trucks using the latest equipment.

I have always had an interest in what my predecessors used. I am not sure what constitutes vintage but some of my own tools are over 25-years old.

Here are examples of some of what I still have and they all still work.

The butt set is a Harris Dracom TS21 model.

Drachenfire 04-13-2019 10:38 AM

Re: Uncommon vintage tools
 
4 Attachment(s)
Here are some vintage telco butt sets.

Drachenfire 04-13-2019 10:40 AM

Re: Uncommon vintage tools
 
2 Attachment(s)
Here are a couple of vintage meters.

Drachenfire 04-13-2019 10:55 AM

Re: Uncommon vintage tools
 
2 Attachment(s)
Safety belt and gaffs.

Even 25-years ago, those safety belts were a marvel of design. The belt that went around the pole was so strong, you could pull a vehicle with it (we had an old unused belt with which we did this on a number of occasions).

I have spent many an hour on gaffs. This is a skill that seems to be waning in the industry with the move towards buried cable and more affordable bucket trucks.

When I was in the trade, if a pole was not stepped or you could not get a ladder to it you strapped up the gaffs.

Gaffing a pole was considered so important a skill that during the four weeks of telco training, we spent the last three hours of every day climbing and maneuvering on poles while wearing gaffs. This extensive training was as much for our safety as it was the skill. A gaff kicking out 30 feet in the air can ruin your day.

lenaitch 04-13-2019 07:21 PM

Re: Uncommon vintage tools
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Drachenfire (Post 5813067)
Safety belt and gaffs.

Even 25-years ago, those safety belts were a marvel of design. The belt that went around the pole was so strong, you could pull a vehicle with it (we had an old unused belt with which we did this on a number of occasions).

I have spent many an hour on gaffs. This is a skill that seems to be waning in the industry with the move towards buried cable and more affordable bucket trucks.

When I was in the trade, if a pole was not stepped or you could not get a ladder to it you strapped up the gaffs.

Gaffing a pole was considered so important a skill that during the four weeks of telco training, we spent the last three hours of every day climbing and maneuvering on poles while wearing gaffs. This extensive training was as much for our safety as it was the skill. A gaff kicking out 30 feet in the air can ruin your day.


Cool! I had to look up "gaffs" to confirm my guess. I haven't seen anybody climb a pole (or seen a pole with "steps") in years. Foresters and arbourists, yes. I suppose it died out because of the mixture of poles made from wood, concrete, poly resin, etc., but I'll guess the biggest driver was occupational health and safety rules.

lenaitch 04-13-2019 07:33 PM

Re: Uncommon vintage tools
 
I have a few jointer and moulding planes I got from my dad and F-in-L. I mostly just keep them around a collectables. An uncle was a carpenter and he gave me a brace and set of bits in a leather pouch.
My dad was an accountant so not much in the way of fun hand-me-downs. When we were cleaning his place out I found the old manual 'adding machine' that I remembered as a kid. It weighed about 25lb, I had no use for it and had a whole house to dispose of so off to the scrap yard it went. My F-in-L was a doctor but a very good woodworker (boats, etc.). He had some really neat stuff that I dearly would have loved to get my hands on but I'm really limited for space and his own sons got first dibs.

spitz1234 04-13-2019 09:03 PM

Re: Uncommon vintage tools
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by lenaitch (Post 5813303)
Cool! I had to look up "gaffs" to confirm my guess. I haven't seen anybody climb a pole (or seen a pole with "steps") in years. Foresters and arbourists, yes. I suppose it died out because of the mixture of poles made from wood, concrete, poly resin, etc., but I'll guess the biggest driver was occupational health and safety rules.

Still used and guys are still trained. I was a lineman for ATT about 9yrs ago. Climbed a few times a week. Hell of alot easier than halling a ladder. I see the power company uses it when there is no access for a bucket truck.

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lenaitch 04-13-2019 09:31 PM

Re: Uncommon vintage tools
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by spitz1234 (Post 5813345)
Still used and guys are still trained. I was a lineman for ATT about 9yrs ago. Climbed a few times a week. Hell of alot easier than halling a ladder. I see the power company uses it when there is no access for a bucket truck.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk


Maybe different jurisdictional rules or company policies. We have an electrical utility guy down the road - I'll have to ask him next time our dogs are exchanging greetings.


Around here if they can't get a truck in they use one of these:


https://powertraxx.com/wp-content/up...09-768x576.jpg

de-nagorg 04-13-2019 09:58 PM

Re: Uncommon vintage tools
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Drachenfire (Post 5813067)
Safety belt and gaffs.

Even 25-years ago, those safety belts were a marvel of design. The belt that went around the pole was so strong, you could pull a vehicle with it (we had an old unused belt with which we did this on a number of occasions).

I have spent many an hour on gaffs. This is a skill that seems to be waning in the industry with the move towards buried cable and more affordable bucket trucks.

When I was in the trade, if a pole was not stepped or you could not get a ladder to it you strapped up the gaffs.

Gaffing a pole was considered so important a skill that during the four weeks of telco training, we spent the last three hours of every day climbing and maneuvering on poles while wearing gaffs. This extensive training was as much for our safety as it was the skill. A gaff kicking out 30 feet in the air can ruin your day.

I have a set of Gaffs, that I acquired some 50 years ago.

Was climbing old abandoned poles as a teenager, to retrieve the old Purple insulators from.

Ever had the gaffs start slipping down the pole, ripping a long splinter as you slip down, damned near Castrated myself, luckily, I saw it coming, and moved back just enough that the splinter was at eye level, when I stopped sliding.

Scared me enough that I created a better safety belt, and secure harness for myself.



ED

spitz1234 04-13-2019 11:48 PM

Re: Uncommon vintage tools
 
We used a Buck Squeeze it's probably standard issue now for safety.

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Drachenfire 04-14-2019 08:35 AM

Re: Uncommon vintage tools
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by de-nagorg (Post 5813375)
Ever had the gaffs start slipping down the pole, ripping a long splinter as you slip down,



ED

We called that burning a pole. I was fortunate in that I never had it happen to me.

When I was in telco, creosote poles were bring replaced with poles treated with other products which made the wood hard and in turn harder to gaff. I was a big guy so I did not have to much trouble as all I had to do was put my weight on the gaff and it would dig in.

We had a young guy on the crew. Hard worker, even though he was all of 5'6" and weighed less than 120 soaking wet. When he climbed, he had to really jam his gaff to get it to dig in.

spitz1234 04-14-2019 08:51 AM

Re: Uncommon vintage tools
 
I worked at ATT for about a year. I was hired on when U-verse started to roll out as a F2 conditioner. Along with about 100 other guys. We were hired as RLTs (regular limited term). They said that's how everyone was hired. Then after the term was up they they **** canned almost everyone.

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GrayHair 04-14-2019 04:15 PM

Re: Uncommon vintage tools
 
Looks like my first butt set; metal diaphram for the speaker went "PINNNNNG" if you weren't in Monitor when you connected to the line.
https://www.diychatroom.com/attachme...n-test-set.jpg

I could go up and down a pole, but couldn't work. If I took my eyes of my knees, they would drift in toward the pole, which pulls your spurs out of pole. Having no desire for a belly full of creosote splinters, I gave up the gaffs.

Drachenfire 04-15-2019 04:04 PM

Re: Uncommon vintage tools
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by GrayHair (Post 5813663)
I could go up and down a pole, but couldn't work. If I took my eyes of my knees, they would drift in toward the pole, which pulls your spurs out of pole. Having no desire for a belly full of creosote splinters, I gave up the gaffs.

When I was on gaffs, I lived by the mantra "butt out".


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