Walls Or Floor First? - General DIY Discussions - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > DIY Forum > General DIY Discussions

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Like Tree5Likes
  • 2 Post By mark sr
  • 1 Post By t.carpenter00
  • 1 Post By carpdad
  • 1 Post By joed
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes
Old 06-26-2018, 07:48 AM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 44
Rewards Points: 82
Default

walls or floor first?


Hello! So, this is probably a super simple question for most, but I'm a newbie so bare with me.

We are getting a pre-fab company to build and install wall, ceiling and roof elements onto a concrete slab, and then we will finish off the interior ourselves.

- should we build the interior walls first, and then the floor? Or floor first, then the interior walls?
- in either case, any tips on how to level the hallway floors to the bathroom floor so there's an even transition?
tambourinecactu is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 06-26-2018, 07:55 AM   #2
retired painter
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: east tenn
Posts: 7,407
Rewards Points: 816
Default

Re: walls or floor first?


If you mean finish floor - it goes in last, if you mean a subfloor - it goes in before the walls are erected.
mark sr is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 06-26-2018, 08:18 AM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 285
Rewards Points: 4
Default

Re: walls or floor first?


Floors last.

Sent from my VS988 using Tapatalk
tambourinecactu likes this.
t.carpenter00 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 06-26-2018, 08:49 AM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 44
Rewards Points: 82
Default

Re: walls or floor first?


Quote:
Originally Posted by mark sr View Post
If you mean finish floor - it goes in last, if you mean a subfloor - it goes in before the walls are erected.
Ok so order might be:

1. concrete slab
2. wall, ceiling, roof elements,
3. subfloor
4. internal walls
5. gypsum wall covers?
6. finish floors
7. bathroom tiles? - how to get these to line up level-wise with finish floors?
tambourinecactu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2018, 09:05 AM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 5,273
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Re: walls or floor first?


Subfloor, then the wall. Finish painting the ceiling, primer and 1st coat of finish paint on walls and doors. Window and other trim paint can be finished. Then floor and last is my 2nd coat of paint. I finish with paint because the surfaces will be covered with smudges and dust during the flooring.
Vacuum clean all surfaces. Vacuuming, if you have black plastic attachment, look for white attachments. Black plastics will leave streaks, esp on the floor, under the finished urethane, like me.
As for the threshold, would you use marble, metal or wood? Usually they are stone or wood for best looks and overlaps the flooring on the wood side for wood expansion. Overlap is covered with rabbeted edge. The edges are also beveled to show least edge to be gradual and nobody stubs their toes. Overlap is not always necessary if the flooring is cut carefully to present a clean line, as is done usually on the tile side. Threshold does not have to be one way, esp if you use the wood. Can be high or low, with more gradual bevel than store bought, installed with glue or screws (brass), under the door jambs or butted into it, etc,etc.

Last edited by carpdad; 06-26-2018 at 09:14 AM.
carpdad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2018, 09:22 AM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 44
Rewards Points: 82
Default

Re: walls or floor first?


Quote:
Originally Posted by carpdad View Post
Subfloor, then the wall. Finish painting the ceiling, primer and 1st coat of finish paint on walls and doors. Window and other trim paint can be finished. Then floor and last is my 2nd coat of paint. I finish with paint because the surfaces will be covered with smudges and dust during the flooring.
Vacuum clean all surfaces. Vacuuming, if you have black plastic attachment, look for white attachments. Black plastics will leave streaks, esp on the floor, under the finished urethane, like me.
As for the threshold, would you use marble, metal or wood? Usually they are stone or wood for best looks and overlaps the flooring on the wood side for wood expansion. Overlap is covered with rabbeted edge. The edges are also beveled to show least edge to be gradual and nobody stubs their toes. Overlap is not always necessary if the flooring is cut carefully to present a clean line, as is done usually on the tile side. Threshold does not have to be one way, esp if you use the wood. Can be high or low, with more gradual bevel than store bought, installed with glue or screws (brass), under the door jambs or butted into it, etc,etc.
hmm you used a lot of words I had to look up there but basically, wood threshold would be fine.

But question on the bathroom. So if the subfloor is the same throughout the whole house (which is 9m x 6x btw). Some sort of floor joists with insulation, then plywood or osb on top, then do you just put tile grout and tiles over the plywood/osb? I saw one video with a whole lot more steps, which seems like it would make the bathroom floor way higher than the rest of the house. Your thoughts?
tambourinecactu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2018, 10:09 AM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 285
Rewards Points: 4
Default

Re: walls or floor first?


I think you're getting a little confused. You have a concrete slab, there is no
" subfloor". If you're worried about your floors transitioning together on the same level, you need to know the approximate thicknesses of the floor materials you are going to work with.

Sent from my VS988 using Tapatalk
t.carpenter00 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2018, 10:14 AM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 44
Rewards Points: 82
Default

Re: walls or floor first?


Quote:
Originally Posted by t.carpenter00 View Post
I think you're getting a little confused. You have a concrete slab, there is no
" subfloor". If you're worried about your floors transitioning together on the same level, you need to know the approximate thicknesses of the floor materials you are going to work with.

Sent from my VS988 using Tapatalk
Ok, yes I dont know all the terminology yet, but since we live in a cold climate we wont leave the concrete slab as the main floor. From what I understand now, we will put down floor joists with a little insulation (if its necessary), plywood on top of that, hardwood on top of that for everything but the bathroom.

For the bathroom, tiles over the plywood, and from what I understand...you just put the tiles over a 'thin-set' mix, then grout it?
tambourinecactu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2018, 10:19 AM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 5,273
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Re: walls or floor first?


Bath floor height is another chapter. Traditional living space floor was 3/4" strip floors. Bath was higher because of 1" min mud substrate, then usual 1/4" or so tiles. I think you must use a separator between the wood underlayment and the tile, esp because they move around differently. I used cement boards or durock (name?) which is a board made with wood dust and cement. Ply/osb subfloor, tarpaper then these boards. Threshold and the bevel would bridge the differences but if you make your own, you can put custom bevels so that the differences are even less, but don't leave too thin a edge which can split off. Maple may be another lumber choice but it splits if too thin. You can also use 5/4 or 2x oak, esp to avoid shimming, if your floor is thicker glass based tiles or stone tiles.
tambourinecactu likes this.
carpdad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2018, 11:40 AM   #10
Super Moderator
 
joed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Welland, Ontario
Posts: 19,089
Rewards Points: 29,512
Blog Entries: 11
Default

Re: walls or floor first?


You need to know your finish floor thickness. Then you can add appropriate thickness of underlayment to keep them level. The tile bathroom floor is going to be the thickest so you need to start with that one when figuring it out. Tile should not directly onto the plywood subfloor.
tambourinecactu likes this.
joed is online now   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Walls bowing out in large room hoffmandirt Building & Construction 8 07-14-2015 08:01 AM
Looking for confirmation these walls are not load-bearing walls jmai14 Remodeling 2 11-09-2013 10:28 PM
Finishing Basement Walls, Inside Perimeter Drains, and Moisture, Oh My BSponz1 Building & Construction 1 02-08-2011 02:20 PM
load bearing walls worriedowner Building & Construction 3 02-02-2011 05:12 PM
Insulation of interior walls around fire place ODD Calmeier Building & Construction 5 01-31-2010 06:59 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts