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Old 05-06-2014, 12:35 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman View Post
My comment about the 3,000 psi pipe being too expensive had nothing to do with the OPS, I was simply pointing out that pipe with an internal pressure rating of 3,000 psi is specialty steel pipe, typically used for industrial use, very expensive, and unnecessary for drainage. My comment had nothing to do with the financial means of the OPS.

I think there are some marking issues on the pipes, which may be related to pipe strength rating. Many pipes are rated for allowable internal pressure. For example, the PEX water pipe I have in my basement is rated for 180 psi at 60 degrees F. The schedule 40 PVC drainage pipe I have around my house is rated for a burst pressure of 710 psi, and a maximum operating pressure of 133 psi (see http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/pv...res-d_796.html). ABS pipe is similar.

Steel pipe can easily get to 3,000 psi burst or operating pressure, but you need very heavy weight, expensive pipe, so I have never seen it used for drainage. For example, Schedule 40 four inch black steel pipe has a burst strength of 6,300 psi, and a working strength of 1,400 psi. If you needed working strength of 3,000 psi, you would need to go to schedule 160 four inch steel pipe.

There are other ways to measure the strength of pipe. There is crushing strength, which is normally only applied to rigid pipe, not flexible pipe like PVC (see http://www.jmeagle.com/pdfs/Technica...rialforPVC.pdf) for a full discussion. There is also the possibility of measuring the bending strength of pipe the same way wood beams are measured, where you would have an allowable bending stress (allowable bending stress for wood is somewhere around 1,200 psi depending on species and grade).

The yield stress for PVC pipe is around 6,000 psi (see http://nova-docdb.fnal.gov/0003/000360/001/nova0060.pdf), so I suppose someone could have marked the yield or allowable stress on the PVC pipe. I have never seen this on PVC pipe I have worked with, because for pipe we normally only care about the internal pressure capability, and the crush strength is not relevant for flexible pipe.

Conclusion: I would like to see the markings on that pipe just for curiosity, but I can assure the OPS that Schedule 40 PVC works fine for drainage, and the 3,000 psi marking does not represent burst strength, or allowable pressure, at least for normally available plastic pipe.

Dan- I think people are taking my response to your comment about affording pipe too serious. However let me explain myself here & to the other readers of this forum. This is a true story. A man came into my screen printing shop one day, whom I had never done business with before. He started odering tens of dozens of T shirts without ever asking the usual questions. I thought he was nuts. In about five minutes he gave me an order with a retail value of $5,000 without a single question asked. Make a long story short, he gave me his check upfront for the order. I checked him out & it turns out that he was the owner of the largest ceramic tile & imported stone counter top shop two towns over from my shop. This incident made me sensitive to the fact that you just never know a persons status or worth. So personally, from that incident on, I've learned to avoid expressing myself in certain ways to others. Your comment about affordability was one of those things I avoid saying to people. I know you were not intending anything personal by it.

What I really was tring to find out is how those 3,000 psi markings on drainage pipe relate to the use. So now I know they referr to external pressures applied to the pipe & not internal. I need to burry the pipe in a shallow tench, anywhere from 8-to12 inches below the surface. I also need to run a 2,400 pound tractor across the area where the pipe will be burried. I just want to know if the pipe will hold up to that weight going over it. Thanks!!!
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Old 05-06-2014, 02:00 PM   #17
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You are over thinking this. Even though your tractor weighs 2400 pounds, you have 4 wheels. Let us assume your tractor has 4 tires of equal size with a contact area of 32 inē (8"x 4" contact) and has a uniform weight distribution. 2400/4/32 =18.75 psi
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Old 05-06-2014, 06:04 PM   #18
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You are over thinking this. Even though your tractor weighs 2400 pounds, you have 4 wheels. Let us assume your tractor has 4 tires of equal size with a contact area of 32 inē (8"x 4" contact) and has a uniform weight distribution. 2400/4/32 =18.75 psi
Actually-I did the math earlier. Numbers don't lie nor the science behind them. It's just that I was thinking maybe Im missing something in all of this. While I don't know what happened here last week- THANKS for your info. And I must confess-I have a tendency to overthink things. And the simpler the problem- the more I overthink. You know somebody's gotta invent the better mouse trap and it might as well be me.
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Old 05-07-2014, 10:17 AM   #19
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I also tend to over think and my wife will give a swift kick in the ... to get me back on track.

I would dig a trench 14" deep to allow for about 2" of bedding material below and on top of the pipe and 6" of dirt for the lawn and use the green pipe.

I also make a copy of my survey and draw all buried lines for my future reference and don't forget to call dig safe.
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Old 05-08-2014, 09:46 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by 47_47 View Post
I also tend to over think and my wife will give a swift kick in the ... to get me back on track.

I would dig a trench 14" deep to allow for about 2" of bedding material below and on top of the pipe and 6" of dirt for the lawn and use the green pipe.

I also make a copy of my survey and draw all buried lines for my future reference and don't forget to call dig safe.
I intend to do what you suggest. Thanks!
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