Need Expert Advise On Weight Limit For Floor - General DIY Discussions - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > DIY Forum > General DIY Discussions

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes
Old 10-20-2011, 11:16 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 14
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Need expert advise on weight limit for floor


Hi, I'm getting a new fish tank soon and thought I should be sure a standard floor in an apartment can hold that much weight.

The tank will be 180g, so that's about 1500lbs just on water volume. I'm guessing with shelf and everything in tank it could be 2200lbs to be safe, over a ton.

Is that safe on a floor? The apartment is newer style and 2nd floor. The footprint will be 6'6" x 2'.

I think it will be ok but want opinions.

Thanks
robsworld78 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 10-21-2011, 12:55 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 17,158
Rewards Points: 6,652
Default


You need to talk to your management to see how far the liability will reach, when your fish tank falls over and soaks the floor, including the tenant downstairs. I personally would not do it.



gregzoll is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to gregzoll For This Useful Post:
robsworld78 (10-23-2011)
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 10-21-2011, 07:06 AM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: western Ny
Posts: 1,662
Rewards Points: 1,336
Default


This discussion comes up every so often on a couple of aquarium sites I am on. Should be no problems. Something else to keep in mind is this. When you have a 180 gallon aquarium, unless you put nothing but the water and fish in the tank the weight will not get to the 1500 lbs. Everything you put in the tank will displace water and is usually lighter or at least as heavy. The only additional weight will be the stand, which you should buy with the tank and verify that it can handle the weight. I don't recall the dimensions of a tank that size but, figuring it is maybe a 10 sf foot print at a max weight of, to be safe, 2000 lbs would put the loading at 200 lbs/sf which is weel within the design capabilities of a floor system. If you look at the total weight as a static load on the floor system the weight will still be spread to at least 3 or more framing members. Ask yourself this question. Would you invite 12-15 people over and worry about them standing on the floor all at once. Years ago I had a 220 gallon water bed on a 2x8 construction floor. Water-1850, Bed frame-250, wife and me-450 ( I am a pretty heave guy), dressers, night stands other misc junk-750 for a total of 3300lbs. Never even as much as cracked the cieling downstairs. When we sold the house and were showing it I think at one point durring an open house we had as many as 7 people in the room.

This is something you should run by your landlord though and I am sure he will freak out over it as most people dont understand that the tank will put less load on the floor than an average kitchen has in it (ever try to lift a full fridge?)
danpik is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to danpik For This Useful Post:
robsworld78 (10-23-2011)
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 10-21-2011, 10:58 PM   #4
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 11,730
Rewards Points: 526
Default


You may want to find the joist direction also.

Gary
__________________
If any ads are present below my answer or words underlined/colored, I do not condone/support/use the product or services listed/linked to, they are there without my consent.
17,000 dryer fires a year, when did you last clean the inside of the dryer near motor or the exhaust ducting?
Gary in WA is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Gary in WA For This Useful Post:
robsworld78 (10-23-2011)
Old 10-23-2011, 02:01 AM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Fairbanks, AK
Posts: 1,936
Rewards Points: 1,178
Default


That is no small addition to the stress already on your floor joists. I would absolutely run that by an engineer who has looked at your situation. Weight at the ends of the joists is nothing like weight in the middle, for ex. Good luck, and remember: When you get tired of the fish, don't flush them. Eat them.
jklingel is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to jklingel For This Useful Post:
robsworld78 (10-23-2011)
Old 10-23-2011, 09:25 AM   #6
Civil Engineer
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Boston
Posts: 5,832
Rewards Points: 5,246
Default


The current "standard" live load code design for a living room is about 40 psf. You are planning to put somewhere around 150 psf. What could possibly go wrong? I find it remarkable that anyone can possibly state with confidence that your floor can handle the load. No one has seen your apartment. You included zero information about the framing, location of the tank etc.

Just to clear things up a little, your tank acts somewhere between a point load and a uniformly distributed load. Point loads near the center of a joist create greater moment than the same amount of weight distributed over the entire floor, so the exact location of the tank with respect to the ends of the joists it covers are critical. Talk to the landlord first. There may well be restrictions in your lease about the amount of load you can put on the floor. A 2000 lb tank is beyond "normal" loading and should be carefully evaluated by a professional before you put it in, not simply evaluated on an internet chat forum.
Daniel Holzman is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Daniel Holzman For This Useful Post:
oh'mike (10-23-2011), robsworld78 (10-23-2011)
Old 10-23-2011, 06:15 PM   #7
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 14
Rewards Points: 10
Default


Thanks for the responses.

I have a stud finder that reads depths to 1 1/2" so I should be able to find the joists in the floor to see which way they run.

The tank will always be against a wall.

I'm definitely ok in my current place because I live in the basement apartment and the floor is concrete but I'm trying to think ahead. Some day I will move, won't be for a long time but I'm sure it will happen at some point.

My friends live in an apartment that has concrete walls between apartments and is quite sound proof so it must be built well you can't heard things through the floors. I'm thinking those apartments would be ok for sure.

I'm thinking new apartments are built stronger than houses?

I have another friend in an older apartment and his floors creak when you walk in spots so I wouldn't even consider it on a floor like that, although he does have a 55g tank which would weight about 600 - 650lbs and is using a 4'x1' footprint so he's running 150psf and its been sitting there for years.

If we go by "psf" then the 180g could go in my friends old creaky apartment.
robsworld78 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2011, 06:41 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 17,158
Rewards Points: 6,652
Default


robsworld78, floors creak, due to the shrinkage of the floor joists, and that in older construction, they did not use the techniques used today.



gregzoll is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
weight limit per person per square foot.... (occupancy) JohnMcc628 Flooring 1 01-03-2011 11:52 AM
Legal weight limit for my dump truck dnh082461 Building & Construction 4 11-04-2010 07:45 PM
Upstairs weight limit osnits Building & Construction 1 10-16-2010 07:16 AM
Makeup Counter Weight Limit? greylockwood Carpentry 1 02-14-2010 08:31 PM
Is there a weight limit in a Garden Window? rwith General DIY Discussions 5 05-15-2009 05:02 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts