Hanging Basement Drywall? - General DIY Discussions - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > DIY Forum > General DIY Discussions

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes
Old 02-15-2015, 05:11 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 372
Rewards Points: 288
Default

Hanging basement drywall?


I'm looking to finish our basement. Ceiling height is at a premium, and being below grade I'll likely be using tile flooring.

Being a man cave, I'm looking to be able to have the guys over occasionally without pissing off the wife if we get too roudy.

I've been on the AVS forum, and they have several $$$ methods to sound proof a room, but I'm really only looking to mute it a bit (I don't think with the pot lights and ductwork it'll be feasible to really soundproof the area).

So here come my questions: is there any real benefit to hanging the ceiling on metal furring strips? (They add an inch to my install).

What about those expensive furring strip isolation clamps?

What about just a layer of 5/8" just to the joists? Or even 5/8" and a layer of 1/2" for more density?

Being below grade, should ceiling drywall be mold resistant? Or since its unlikely to be in contact with water (unless a pipe bursts) can I save some cash and go with standard drywall?
gizzygone is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-15-2015, 05:19 PM   #2
Exterior Construction
 
Windows on Wash's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Washington DC Metro Area (VA, MD, DC)
Posts: 22,041
Rewards Points: 7,794
Blog Entries: 40
Default


Resilient channel, more importantly on sound clips, works very well. Couple that with some sound reduction drywall and you have a very well performing assembly.

The clips and the channel will probably cost you about 2" in overall height. Not that much, but it depends on what you are willing to sacrifice.

If not that, you can double up the drywall and use some sound glue between the layers.

Doesn't need to be mold resistant as long as you insulation schedule, air sealing, and foundation water management are correct.
Windows on Wash is online now   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-15-2015, 06:32 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 372
Rewards Points: 288
Default


The resilient channel and clips seem to add quite a bit of cost to the project.... And they seem to be difficult to find (it seems every online specialist offers their own version...).

The sound resistant drywall is also about 4x as expensive as standard drywall.

How much of an improvement are we talking?!
gizzygone is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-15-2015, 06:40 PM   #4
Exterior Construction
 
Windows on Wash's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Washington DC Metro Area (VA, MD, DC)
Posts: 22,041
Rewards Points: 7,794
Blog Entries: 40
Default


Decent bit as compared to standard framing.

Can make you own rubber isolation strip between the resilient channel and the framing if you are industrious...I guess.
Windows on Wash is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2015, 06:48 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 372
Rewards Points: 288
Default


Any suggestions on a decent clip brand?

Most of the ones Ive found are about an inch installed, plus the 7/8" furring strip, then add the 5/8" drywall and you're sitting at 2.5-3" of lost height off the bat.
gizzygone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2015, 08:52 PM   #6
Exterior Construction
 
Windows on Wash's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Washington DC Metro Area (VA, MD, DC)
Posts: 22,041
Rewards Points: 7,794
Blog Entries: 40
Default


All the clips will cost you the height you reference above.

For reference, I wasn't figuring the thickness of the drywall in the total given that it was a constant.

I have always wondered about ripping down some rubber into strips and run that as an isolation strip between the channel and the framing. Sort of a vibration break.

That would eliminate the thickness of the clip and expense. Bond the rubber to the framing via a "sound" specific glue and then hang the channel over that.
Windows on Wash is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2015, 09:00 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 372
Rewards Points: 288
Default


I was wondering something similar: except maybe using a foam gasket type material?

I can't think of a rubber that would be soft enough and last long enough (it seems the softer rubbers degrade and harden with time).
gizzygone is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Leveling basement ceiling for drywall joshs Drywall & Plaster 5 03-04-2013 07:16 AM
Hanging drywall in partially finished basement KBG Drywall & Plaster 3 03-04-2012 09:52 PM
Drywall hanging HELP!! topflitecop21 Building & Construction 8 01-16-2012 10:21 PM
Drywall Hanging Service Perry401 Drywall & Plaster 2 05-28-2011 05:20 PM
Drywall, insulation, framing and basement. Timothyv Building & Construction 7 03-31-2011 01:12 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts