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Old 11-22-2013, 01:38 PM   #16
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Quote:
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I think a bigger savings could be realized by rigging up an outside air supply to feed the dryer's air intake so your indoor air was not being expelled from the house.
Not too difficult --- I crack the window beside my dryer when I run my dryer. Joed's link says that it won't help in the winter because the dryer has to heat the air from a lower starting temperature. What they did not figure on though, is that cold winter air typically has a very low absolute humidity, so will more readily pick up moisture. Plus, in the winter, using outside air for the dryer will help maintain the humidity level in the living space (since otherwise, moist living space air is expelled, and replaced by dry outside air).
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Old 11-22-2013, 01:59 PM   #17
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I have heard that relative humidity is the drop of sweat running down your sister's back while you make love to here but that was somewhere in West Virginia. Never heard a definition for absolute humidity though. At any rate, 30 degree air @ 50% RH will be near nothing by the time it gets past the heating coils. And that will dry clothes fast!
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Old 11-23-2013, 09:38 AM   #18
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Absolute humidity is the bulk amount of water vapor present in a specific volume of air, regardless of temperature. Relative humidity is the volume of water vapor that air can hold at a specific temperature.
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Old 11-23-2013, 07:34 PM   #19
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This is such a fabulous idea. I would just cut the exhaust into the furnace return and set the fan on continuous run. Put a leg of panty hose on the exhaust to catch the big stuff and let the furnace filter catch the smaller stuff. If you don't want your house to smell like legs, then pick some other part of the panty hose. You have two other flavors to choose from.
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Old 11-24-2013, 06:22 AM   #20
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Aren't you the frugal one? Use new panty hose instead of used ones.
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Old 11-24-2013, 07:46 AM   #21
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imo ..that was very old school..now we know so much more about air control and condition....so its not good to do what you are thinking sorry for being blunt but just stating the facts....ben sr
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Old 11-24-2013, 09:25 AM   #22
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TIf you don't want your house to smell like legs, then pick some other part of the panty hose. You have two other flavors to choose from.
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Old 11-24-2013, 11:30 AM   #23
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Actually, it will work without any problems. I have seen it done before.
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Old 11-28-2013, 12:55 PM   #24
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The answer to this depends on a lot of things.
If you live in an older house with insufficient insulation and no vapor barriers, the extra moisture will condense in places you don't want it to. Usually this is inside exterior walls and the underside of the roof. If your house is fairly new, well insulated and has well ventilated attic space it probably won't make much difference.
Also depends on how many loads of laundry you do per week.
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