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Old 08-09-2013, 02:36 PM   #1
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Attaching wood trim to bottom of steel beam


I have a steel beam spanning an opening, and I need to trim around it. The sides are covered in drywall, but the bottom is exposed. I was going to just use construction adhesive to attach a 1x8 to the bottom of it, but I'm not thinking that's going to be strong enough. So maybe I'll get another piece of 1x8, use powder actuated fasteners to attach it to the beam, then use 1" brads to attach the finish piece to the first 1x8.

Any other (better) way to do this? Thanks.
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Old 08-09-2013, 02:45 PM   #2
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Unless you are planning to try and attach a chin up bar to the bottom of the steel beam, construction adhesive will do just fine to attach drywall directly to the steel. Alternatively, you can attach plywood to the sides of the beam using metal clips, then attach the bottom piece of plywood to the side pieces of plywood using screws. Then attach the drywall to the plywood using drywall screws.

Powder actuated fasteners will certainly work, but that is overkill unless you have need for structural rated attached members.
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Old 08-09-2013, 02:47 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman View Post
Unless you are planning to try and attach a chin up bar to the bottom of the steel beam, construction adhesive will do just fine to attach drywall directly to the steel. Alternatively, you can attach plywood to the sides of the beam using metal clips, then attach the bottom piece of plywood to the side pieces of plywood using screws. Then attach the drywall to the plywood using drywall screws.

Powder actuated fasteners will certainly work, but that is overkill unless you have need for structural rated attached members.
I'm not attaching drywall, I was going to attach a 1x8 directly to it. I just figured that a 1x8x12' was a bit too heavy for adhesive. What do you think?
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Old 08-09-2013, 03:54 PM   #4
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You could drill and tap some 1/4-20 holes in the beam, and then secure the 1x8 with flat head machine screws. (Locate the holes near the edge of the beam flange ---where the steel is thinner. Drilling those holes will be a good workout)

Last edited by SPS-1; 08-09-2013 at 04:43 PM.
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Old 08-09-2013, 03:59 PM   #5
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If you are not planning to load the 1x8, construction adhesive is more than adequate. Just make sure the steel is clean and dry before you apply the adhesive, and make sure you use an adhesive rated for contact with steel and wood. I think PL-6 is rated as such, but best to check with the manufacturer first.

The idea of tapping some screws is also good, but more work than adhesive. I have a steel beam between my kitchen and my dining room, and I directly glued the drywall on the bottom to the beam, it worked fine.
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Old 08-09-2013, 08:29 PM   #6
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You'll be shocked at how well good construction adhesive will do.

That stuff is ridiculously strong.

Having said that, I have seen a few times where after years of use, it will dry out and crack and that board could fall.

If it were mine, I would use the adhesive and probably hold it with a mechanical connection in a few spots as a safeguard.
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Old 08-10-2013, 02:05 PM   #7
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If this is decorative, and weight is a concern, do you need 1" thick?

Why not just trim out a thinner piece of veneer plywood or even paneling and be done with it? Then, I think you would have no worries about construction adhesive at all. If wood to steel as mentioned. Granted, 12' long could be a challenge.

I am also confused about whether this wrapping is going to be drywall and wood, drywall and wood on the sides with just wood on the bottom, etc.
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Old 08-11-2013, 01:36 AM   #8
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I can solve your problem in just one word... "hot glue and 100 percent silicone"
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Old 08-11-2013, 11:04 AM   #9
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Like the others have said, glue.

To your advantage, it's a large surface area. Say the glue you use has a holding power of 1 lb per sq/in.....well...if you put a board up there that is 6" wide and 24" long...assuming it did not flex, it would take 144 lbs of force to pull it off.

Get the idea?

I would go with construction adhesive over silicone. It will set a whole lot faster.

Another option is contact cement.....but I would choose the ca over the contact...the ca will give you time to get it placed where you want.

You want to make sure you have some boards to push up against it to hold it in place while the adhesive sets.
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Old 08-11-2013, 02:05 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ddawg16 View Post

I would go with construction adhesive over silicone. It will set a whole lot faster.



You want to make sure you have some boards to push up against it to hold it in place while the adhesive sets.
That is what the hot glue is for, temporary holding power until the real adhesive (100% silicone or hot glue) sets.
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Old 08-11-2013, 02:06 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by one cut View Post
That is what the hot glue is for, temporary holding power until the real adhesive (100% silicone or construction adhesive) sets.
I have edited the post.
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