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Old 01-03-2020, 04:18 AM   #1
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Adding a pull up bar in the garage.


I want to add a pull up bar in the house. I've tried those over the door ones, and they don't work well. I am going to add one in my garage. I think I should be able to make a great one, but this has the potential to go really bad, and I'm new to stuff like this, so hoping for some help.

* My plan is to use 3/4" galvanized pipe (humid south texas).
* I am going to get rid of the middle top bar (circled in red)
* It is going to be 48" wide or two 24" bars with a Tee in the middle going to the wall.
* It is going to be 18" from wall.
* Instead of using a tee and then an elbow like in the picture, I will use a 90 degree elbow with side outlet (combining those two) at the two ends of the bar.
* At the ceiling and wall between the flange and drywall would be a 2x6 x6' board for each that is a 72" long board. I figured this length would give me enough to connect to four of the 16" span studs, with a little extra on the ends.
* I was going to use either two or three lag screws, 5/16 x 3 1/2" at each stud on each board.
* I was planning on using some type of countersunk bolt from the back side (with the head between the board and the drywall, and lock washers with screws on the visible side connecting the flange to the board.
* I will predrill everything.

I have zero problem with overkill and trying to make sure this has no problem supporting lets just push it and say 300 pounds (me plus holding a lot of weight if I get back to that shape).

Am I missing something, Is this overkill, should I change something?? Thank you.
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Old 01-03-2020, 05:30 AM   #2
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Re: Adding a pull up bar in the garage.


Galvanized maybe a rough finish so you may not want that for the working bar and I think I would adapt that one up to a bigger size like 1 1/4 or 1 1/2" which ever is more comfortable for your grip.

You might look at a shrink to fit cover for it.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07VRLG79C...jaz10cnVl&th=1
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Old 01-03-2020, 05:56 AM   #3
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Re: Adding a pull up bar in the garage.


I always wear workout gloves when I use a pull up bar. It just makes sure my hands aren't the first thing that gets tired. This used to be outside too where the bar got hot, so force of habit. I didn't know the galvanized would have a rough finish, but I'm guessing with gloves I won't notice.

I tried to grip different pill bottles and other hygiene to get the right size. I wanted the bar size somewhere between a little bigger than 1" - 1.5". I saw that 3/4" pipe had an OD of 1.05". I was debating on going with a 1" pipe that had an OD of 1.32. I still haven't decided on that, (my first store I checked didn't have everything in 1", but they did in 3/4"). Maybe I should just go grip em both next time I'm at the hardware store and see which feels better, before I commit.

I have a chipped bone in my wrist, so I have to get a better "full hand" grip to use them, or I would go with a larger bar. I prefer a 2" grip, but with the angles I have to use its better to get a full grip. I have to do pushups on my fists, or my wrist gives out first when I do em palms down.
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Old 01-03-2020, 06:06 AM   #4
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Re: Adding a pull up bar in the garage.


I hadn't thought of ID and OD
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Old 01-03-2020, 08:06 AM   #5
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Re: Adding a pull up bar in the garage.


If you would replace the ells as in the drawing, with T's as in the center support, then the length can be added to at anytime in the future for more pull ups , storage racks / shelves or whatever. Recommend plugging the T's with a plastic plug or other to prevent wasp entry / nest building.
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Old 01-03-2020, 08:15 AM   #6
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Re: Adding a pull up bar in the garage.


Would there be an objection to moving the entire rack to the right, over the studs? That would eliminate the need for additional bolts, etc into the board. You can lag directly into the stud/joist and compliment it with washers and bolts on the outward edge if you wanted to. I agree, too, with a larger OD pipe. Unless you have girlie hands, 3/4" is too small, IMO. Check out chin bars at a local gym to see what size they use. That may help in the decision, as I am sure there has been some scientific thought put into it.
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Old 01-03-2020, 08:29 AM   #7
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Re: Adding a pull up bar in the garage.


Unless you are a large man, I doubt anything bigger than 3/4" nominal pipe will feel right on your hands.

Pipe may deflect about a quarter inch. So what ?

One thing the guy messed up in the photo is the length of the board on the ceiling. Make sure you hit a stud on both sides of each pipe flange.

Your plan sounds fine.


.
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Last edited by SPS-1; 01-03-2020 at 08:34 AM.
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Old 01-03-2020, 08:48 AM   #8
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Re: Adding a pull up bar in the garage.


Is 18" gonna be enough wall clearance? Also, why 48" long? That seems excessive.
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Old 01-03-2020, 11:47 AM   #9
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Re: Adding a pull up bar in the garage.


You asked “Am I missing something…”, so I’ll mention that you should consider what is behind the ceiling drywall. If there is living space above the garage then you’ll be fine to attach your structure to the floor joists, which can easily carry this kind of load. If the garage has a truss framed roof directly above it, then you’re planning to apply a highly dynamic repetitive load to the lower chord of a truss, which isn’t designed to support it. The lower chord (piece of lumber) of a truss can support a distributed load of drywall, etc. and it can even support the load of garage doors when they’re opened or people when they’re crawling around in the attic. For the magnitude of load that you’re planning, spread across several trusses, it’s probably a non-issue (unless the repetitive load starts to work the truss plates loose), but consider this if you ever plan to support more of a load, like throwing a chain over it to use a winch to lift something. Our garage had a similar setup hanging from the trusses that the previous owners were using to support a lot of spare lumber. It’s gone now.

More info in this other currently active thread:
https://www.diychatroom.com/f19/hang...eiling-675813/

Chris
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Old 01-03-2020, 11:58 AM   #10
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Re: Adding a pull up bar in the garage.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris616 View Post
If the garage has a truss framed roof directly above it, then you’re planning to apply a highly dynamic repetitive load to the lower chord of a truss, which isn’t designed to support it.

Good point. On the plus side, the closer to a support wall, the better the situation (at least for bending load on the truss member).
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Old 01-03-2020, 02:46 PM   #11
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Re: Adding a pull up bar in the garage.


Quote:
Originally Posted by SeniorSitizen View Post
If you would replace the ells as in the drawing, with T's as in the center support, then the length can be added to at anytime in the future for more pull ups , storage racks / shelves or whatever. Recommend plugging the T's with a plastic plug or other to prevent wasp entry / nest building.
I hadn't thought of that, but I like that idea. I would have about 7 feet before the garage door as is. I want to keep it at that height, because I like to be fully extended with arms and legs straight between reps, (keeping my lower body at-attention (military style), seems like proper from. It would give me enough to keep some project boards, pipes, and some car parts out of the way.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chandler48 View Post
Would there be an objection to moving the entire rack to the right, over the studs? That would eliminate the need for additional bolts, etc into the board. You can lag directly into the stud/joist and compliment it with washers and bolts on the outward edge if you wanted to. I agree, too, with a larger OD pipe. Unless you have girlie hands, 3/4" is too small, IMO. Check out chin bars at a local gym to see what size they use. That may help in the decision, as I am sure there has been some scientific thought put into it.
I just didn't think I would be able to get into the studs that way. Using the board seemed the only way I could guarantee it would line up.

I would rather go too small then too large. I like a 2" grip size for my hands, but going too big means I have to put an angle on my wrists or my grip is based off on my finger tips, and not the first joint and part of the palm. I also like to hang from my finger tips for however long I can.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SPS-1 View Post
Unless you are a large man, I doubt anything bigger than 3/4" nominal pipe will feel right on your hands.

Pipe may deflect about a quarter inch. So what ?

One thing the guy messed up in the photo is the length of the board on the ceiling. Make sure you hit a stud on both sides of each pipe flange.

Your plan sounds fine.


.
Thanks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by huesmann View Post
Is 18" gonna be enough wall clearance? Also, why 48" long? That seems excessive.

(18" out) I hang straight down when I do them, I don't do bicycle or kick out. I get better form with the lower half still, with knees straight, heels together and toes out for 90 degrees (im a veteran, military 'at attention' for lower half).
To make sure I hit enough studs, and for when I wanted to go wide arm. I could probably do 40" and it would work just fine, I just had the room for it, and didn't know of any reason not to.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris616 View Post
You asked “Am I missing something…”, so I’ll mention that you should consider what is behind the ceiling drywall. If there is living space above the garage then you’ll be fine to attach your structure to the floor joists, which can easily carry this kind of load. If the garage has a truss framed roof directly above it, then you’re planning to apply a highly dynamic repetitive load to the lower chord of a truss, which isn’t designed to support it. The lower chord (piece of lumber) of a truss can support a distributed load of drywall, etc. and it can even support the load of garage doors when they’re opened or people when they’re crawling around in the attic. For the magnitude of load that you’re planning, spread across several trusses, it’s probably a non-issue (unless the repetitive load starts to work the truss plates loose), but consider this if you ever plan to support more of a load, like throwing a chain over it to use a winch to lift something. Our garage had a similar setup hanging from the trusses that the previous owners were using to support a lot of spare lumber. It’s gone now.

More info in this other currently active thread:
https://www.diychatroom.com/f19/hang...eiling-675813/

Chris
Above the garage is just the attic. There are pre-fabbed trusses. I do want to get back in to working on my pickup now that I have space. If I did add on an extra length for storage it would be for project 2x4s, pvc pipe, lightweight bulky car parts, I have a speed bench that I just replaced, and would probably donate otherwise. I don't think I would ever get more than 100 pounds up there. The ceiling board is planned to span 4 trusses.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SPS-1 View Post
Good point. On the plus side, the closer to a support wall, the better the situation (at least for bending load on the truss member).

Last edited by wthdideyedo; 01-03-2020 at 02:49 PM.
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Old 01-03-2020, 02:59 PM   #12
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Re: Adding a pull up bar in the garage.


......................
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Old 01-03-2020, 03:53 PM   #13
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Re: Adding a pull up bar in the garage.


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......................
8 must be metric for a dozen
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Old 01-04-2020, 07:06 AM   #14
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Re: Adding a pull up bar in the garage.


I have a power rack in my basement and it has a built in pull up bar. Its solid and you can do much more with it.
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