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Old 06-09-2009, 09:49 AM   #16
 
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Yes, the flashing is under the tile. It is L shaped, so that half is behind the tile backing going up the wall, the other half is buried beneath the tile on the outside floor. The grout, or whatever they use on the floor to hold tile down, was built up close to the house and then sloped down slightly towards the outer edge.

I can't say that the water stands, but the rain and wind do drive it against the wall. The water hits the wall and drains off to the yard, in heavy rains.

The reason the windows are so low, is because the roof is low... It is barely over my head.

This room is a 2 sided project, marvel, nightmare??? This is because it fits beneath a roof, with the house enclosing it on 2 sides. You see one side-the long one. Think of it as a rectangle with 2 sides needing protection-a long side and a short side. The short side has tiled floor (and tile backing up the wall part of the way), but no flashing. This side is covered by the roof, which probably extends about 10 feet. It gets wet some, but moreso if I hose off the area. Maybe this should have had flashing too.

I learned a lot with this project. One: sometimes it is just easier to move if you need more room. Two: do NOT have porcelain tile put outside in an area where it gets wet... Looks nice, but "slick" on outdoor porcelain is bad news if you fall...

I have not even described the problems with the first contractor. Let me just offer a brief description of the "final." One week after completion, it rained and poured in both skylights by the bucket.. He was standing on the roof fighting with the company who manufactured the skylights, both blaming each other for the mess... Eventually, we gave up and had the house reroofed...

It would probably have been cheaper to move...
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Old 06-09-2009, 12:12 PM   #17
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If its caulked & sealed it should stand up to the blowing rain
I had a poorly caulked window on the 2nd floor at an Apt leak

Just keep an eye on the caulk over the years
Hopefullly they used a 20-30 year caulk
But caulk will eventually fail
As long as proper maintenance is performed it should be OK
I have over a dozen skylights in my house
Each has been carefully flashed & sealed - but they can still eventually leak.
Enjoy the new room



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Old 06-09-2009, 08:38 PM   #18
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Scarlett, I cant make this out. Where does this downspout drain?
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Old 06-09-2009, 11:57 PM   #19
 
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The downspout drains into the French drain. I see it looks like there is a hose in front of it. Actually, that is the soaker house that is supposed to drip around the house to keep the foundation from moving in Texas heat.

There is also a downspout near the other end of the porch that drains into the French drain also. Some of the houses built in this time frame have big sloping roofs. When it rains, the wash off is extremely heavy.

I am concerned over the way this was flashed. I have only seen flashing, other than around a chimney, used in a house at ground level one other time and it appeared to be some type of rubber. Do you think aluminum applied in the manned described is OK, as long as it is well caulked?

Thanks,

scarlett

My next project hopefully, will be a pond...

Last edited by scarlett; 06-10-2009 at 12:02 AM.
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Old 06-10-2009, 11:21 PM   #20
 
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I do not think you have anything to worry about. The question I have is- was there good drainage away from that area before the convert. If you have good drainage away from the house you should be ok. That being said, you can always slope the ground away a little more. I live in the Dallas area too, And if I recall most foundations should be required to have a three inch or greater grade. I am only on my second house as an owner. One thing I really looked at when buying both of my house's is the soil line around the foundation. Water can enter if it tops your cement where it meets you first brick layer. Every now and then after I first got into a house I would go look around during the rain to see how the drainage was doing. If you see an area where you think the soil is to high around the foundation, or to much water standing just remove some soil and slope it away from house.

Does the french drain run out to the curb. If it does and it drains good that should be fine. Otherwise to be on safe side I would have a solid drain run and get the water out of there.

Last edited by rcayard7; 06-10-2009 at 11:25 PM.
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