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Old 07-18-2009, 09:20 PM   #16
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Joshoc, yes, the flashing should just over lap the hem and lay loosely in place. You really should do a google search or look on some vinyl siding manufacturers websites as you will be able to get some good photos of what I am describing.

For flashing tape, there are a few brands of it available usually in 4 inch or 6 inch. I like to run a heat gun and a few staples at the top in a situation like this.

I would run the flashing behind the foam board just to make sure you are picking up all the liquid moisture running down the wall.

Make sure to get a piece bent to match the angle of the wall to the roof. You should be able to special order a nice piece of painted steel (24 gauge) to match your shingles.

Aluminum flashing does hold up 30 years, there's no argument there, unless you've placed it in a place where you have ice buildup. You're still going to get the black mildewy chaulky look after a few years and you'd better be careful not to ding it and put dents in it. I'd like my work to last longer than that. Aluminum cannot be used on chimney flashings. The makeup of the mortar in a chimney corrodes the aluminum. Also, I mentioned increased expansion and contraction. Whenever you place a nail in aluminum you are restricting the movement. That nail hole is just going to get bigger and bigger because the aluminum will tear slightly around that hole. (I don't like the wrinkly look either.) That's fine if you have a peel and stick membrane underneath, but in most situations you won't and you're bound to get some leakage. In some of the more corrosive areas aluminum does rust, or oxidize. If you've ever seen what salt does to door trim wrapped in aluminum in the winter you know what I'm talking about.
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Old 07-18-2009, 10:01 PM   #17
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Joshoc, yes, the flashing should just over lap the hem and lay loosely in place. You really should do a google search or look on some vinyl siding manufacturers websites as you will be able to get some good photos of what I am describing.

For flashing tape, there are a few brands of it available usually in 4 inch or 6 inch. I like to run a heat gun and a few staples at the top in a situation like this.

I would run the flashing behind the foam board just to make sure you are picking up all the liquid moisture running down the wall.

Make sure to get a piece bent to match the angle of the wall to the roof. You should be able to special order a nice piece of painted steel (24 gauge) to match your shingles.

Aluminum flashing does hold up 30 years, there's no argument there, unless you've placed it in a place where you have ice buildup. You're still going to get the black mildewy chaulky look after a few years and you'd better be careful not to ding it and put dents in it. I'd like my work to last longer than that. Aluminum cannot be used on chimney flashings. The makeup of the mortar in a chimney corrodes the aluminum. Also, I mentioned increased expansion and contraction. Whenever you place a nail in aluminum you are restricting the movement. That nail hole is just going to get bigger and bigger because the aluminum will tear slightly around that hole. (I don't like the wrinkly look either.) That's fine if you have a peel and stick membrane underneath, but in most situations you won't and you're bound to get some leakage. In some of the more corrosive areas aluminum does rust, or oxidize. If you've ever seen what salt does to door trim wrapped in aluminum in the winter you know what I'm talking about.
I think that you are saying again something I will disagree with. First, he is using vinyl siding with aluminum trim. Second he said nothing about chimney flashing. Third, aluminum expands and contracts at approx the same rate as dteel and copper.

Just because you have a problem with aluminun don't pass it on. Your prejustices are showing.

I use aluminum because it is long lasting and can be bought in a rariety of colors. Personaaly I use .032 al. when flashing. You will find if you did the same, your frashing would last as long as steel and give copper a run for the money. Remwember, steel if not painted corrodes as rust quite quickley. The only downfall to it, is that it is not to be uses in contact with morter.
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Old 07-18-2009, 11:12 PM   #18
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I feel like I understand now, now I just have to find someone to come do the job. Only one question remains, which is: Rain water must have been getting behind the vinyl siding near these windows ever since the house was built in 2001, long before the issue came to my attention after the porch roof ledger board installation last month. Not to mention the fact that I have other windows with siding next to them on the back of the house, aside from the windows above the ledger, and rain water must be getting behind the siding there too. What was the housebuilder's plan for where this water would drain once it got behind the siding? I mean, I presume that once the water gets behind the siding that it would run down the surface of the foam board to the base of the house, but then what? I looked all along the back of the house today (the back side has the vinyl siding) at the bottoms of the last rows of siding where the siding stops, and the foam board does not go down that far. (I peaked behind the bottom row of siding and all I saw was what I think to be a perimeter joist, one of the joists that runs perpindicular to all the main joists of the house, and attached to the joist was a long horizontal strip of metal that the bottom of the last piece of siding clamps on to) So where does the water go when it gets to the bottom of the foam board? It appears that the foam board terminates at some point above the joist that I saw. I don't see that the water is being guided out in any way at all. Any thoughts?
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Old 07-19-2009, 02:36 AM   #19
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Tere is a long tutorial from somebody floating around here,,,maybe named tinner or similiar. It explains along with tons of pics this very issue. And explains the PROPER way to flash windows of which 95 percent arent!! Are you sure there is no flashing around al windows?? If not maybe you should put some on somehow. Thats why they sell the unzip tool and hopefully your siding isnt nailed too close to the windows.

In that tutorial it describes cutting drain holes in the bottom of the sidng right where the metal flashing exits on the bottoms.

Why find somebody to do this for you??Makes a great diy project and THEN you KNOW its done correctly
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Old 07-19-2009, 08:14 AM   #20
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Well, you saw the posts before I mentioned the L-shaped flashing. Not many people know to do this and not many people install this piece of flashing. A lot of contractors never do this and never give thought to what happens to the water that gets behind the siding.
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Old 07-19-2009, 08:52 AM   #21
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Well, you saw the posts before I mentioned the L-shaped flashing. Not many people know to do this and not many people install this piece of flashing. A lot of contractors never do this and never give thought to what happens to the water that gets behind the siding.
And to finish your post, that is why rainscreen is now recommended and required in some juristictions!
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Old 07-19-2009, 05:50 PM   #22
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If I did decide to do the job myself like 4just suggests, where would I call to order the custom made flashing? A roofing supply store same as where a professional roofer would get it?
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Old 07-19-2009, 06:20 PM   #23
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Yes, a roofing supply company would have something like that or even your local lumberyard should be able to special order it.
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Old 07-19-2009, 09:51 PM   #24
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If your using alum. you can shape it yourself. I bent alot around edge of 3" angle iron and sure looks good. steel would be tough. but heard you can pinch it in a door and do pretty good.

On the alum I kinked each edge a bit and held that on my edge to keep it straight. then use one hand to prebend and other to do actual bending. you HAVE to overbend it a bit to get proper angle on it,no matter what your bending.

Most siding places will custom bend a piece on their brake for you,,,you may have to provide stock for them if they dont use that stuff. or try a heating,ac install place,,,if your using galvinized it would be same as furnace duct,,,,no???

Stair stepping 2 to 3 foot pieces would be easier than trying to wiggle say 10 foot in there all at once
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Old 07-20-2009, 02:30 PM   #25
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Jaros, what about the left and right edges of the flashing at the point where the flashing exits out from behind the siding. What is the configuration/procedure there supposed to be in order for it to not leak at those two spots.
Thanks
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Old 07-20-2009, 06:47 PM   #26
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You can put a hem on it if you like but you make the L-shaped flashing big enough it shouldn't run off the ends.
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