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Old 01-17-2011, 04:51 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by Dwoodsmith View Post
Those are microlams!
No they ain't!


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When in doubt- rip it out.
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When in doubt- Figure it out - BEFORE you rip it out.

There's no need for him to rip it out until he figure's out the problem. There are many ways to solve this without ripping it out.
Please listen to Joe and Lone. Dwood is just spouting nonsense
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Old 01-18-2011, 12:49 AM   #32
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A little progress


Cleared a path to work including moving 10 or so boxes of oak flooring. On the right I notched the lower top plate to get the new board tilted in and for the new stud that will be added to complete the saddle. The 2x12 is cut to length.

On the left I cut out the drywall and put in a steel column. Should I just cut off the top 18" of the king stud to get the new board in place and patch in a new 18" 2x4 or should I remove the entire king stud and replace it with a full length new stud?

I started on the wall till the baby went to sleep and I had to be quiet. I have 2 more steel adjustable columns, but I'm not sure where to put them.
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Old 01-18-2011, 06:55 AM   #33
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If you intend to use steel columns as a permanent support and are located in the US, you should not use the telescoping type:

Inspecting Adjustable Steel Columns
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Old 01-18-2011, 07:43 AM   #34
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Beyond that, the new pictures raise additional questions, such as:

Were these joists sistered for some reason? Or did they previously overlap above a beam, an the beam has been moved to the right?

If the beam has been moved, what are its current end-supports bearing on?
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triple 2x12 beam with rot and pics-josits2.jpg  
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Old 01-18-2011, 08:03 AM   #35
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My question is...is the condition of the beam causing any kind of real world problem other than a bit of angst in the OP?

I have seen a lot of damage very similar to this in my area all caused by differing problems.

IMHO this does not look bad enough to warrant contemplating ripping out the beam.

If it rally causes you grief then get another 2 x 12 and sister it on to the offending beam, throw in a 2 x on either side of the new 2 x 12 and call it a day.

Andy.

Yeah, that's it I wouldn't rip that out from the pictures it don't look like it lost support value. I think the OP should relax and think about this again before starting demolition. But it sounds like some how it's coming down, it's cheaper and easier to call in an engineer or a experienced homebuilder to evaluate the situation before diagnosing the problem. Not all things can be accurately depicted from photographs.
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Old 01-18-2011, 08:12 AM   #36
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OPS TO LATE
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Old 01-18-2011, 11:24 AM   #37
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Mike Thomas, those are just the overlapped joists from the other side.

Since the OP is doing the work himself, I doubt it would be cheaper than calling a pro in to evaluate.
It doesn't seem like that much work to replace one ply of that beam. It's the right move.
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Old 01-18-2011, 11:47 AM   #38
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Mike Thomas, those are just the overlapped joists from the other side.

Since the OP is doing the work himself, I doubt it would be cheaper than calling a pro in to evaluate.
It doesn't seem like that much work to replace one ply of that beam. It's the right move.
"If it needs to be done at all".
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Old 01-18-2011, 12:33 PM   #39
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Mike Thomas, those are just the overlapped joists from the other side.
Not so sure... in the photo it looks to me like the short end of joists are toward us, in which case they don't pass over the beam and are supported by their connections to the joists behind them... it which case it's possible the beam has been moved (normally, the joists would overlap the beam from both sides, and both set of joist ends would be supported by the beam).
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Old 01-18-2011, 01:41 PM   #40
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Not so sure... in the photo it looks to me like the short end of joists are toward us, in which case they don't pass over the beam and are supported by their connections to the joists behind them... it which case it's possible the beam has been moved (normally, the joists would overlap the beam from both sides, and both set of joist ends would be supported by the beam).
If you look at the first picture, you'll see the beam integrated into, what looks like, the original location of the foundation wall.
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Old 01-18-2011, 03:01 PM   #41
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Looks to me more like the end of the beam is cut short of whatever is behind it, rather than a beam sitting in a pocket.

However, thanks for getting me to take a second look, in that picture the joists from both sides are supported by the beam.
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Old 01-18-2011, 04:20 PM   #42
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Let me also point out, look at the markings on the original 2x12 to ensure that it isn't a stronger species of wood and you don't replace it with a weaker species. We don't have nearly enough info here to say how much design margin you have on 2x12 triple beam of unknown species.

It might not be an issue, but I'm just cognizant of it because I'm doing rotted wood repair in my house structure - much worse rot on floor joists plus adding beams, and the original 2x6 boards used would be very undersized with what I have available from big box stores.
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Old 01-19-2011, 12:53 AM   #43
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Daughter's boyfriend decided to "help"



While I was at work my daughter's boyfriend who was off work today decided to "help" and cut out the 2x4 on the left and removed the outer board that was rotted from the support beam - WTF? I wasn't even done building the temporary wall! Then on the right side where I had carefully notched the lower part of the top plate, he hacked out a bigger section through the entire top plate and succeeded in removing a hunk of sheathing and pushed out a bump in the aluminum siding (probably hit it with the reciprocating saw during his butcher operation) He cut the beam in 2 places, but was careless and cut 1/8" into the 2nd board on one and the second cut has a few inches that are 1/4" deep : I'm not in a good mood.




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Let me also point out, look at the markings on the original 2x12 to ensure that it isn't a stronger species of wood and you don't replace it with a weaker species. We don't have nearly enough info here to say how much design margin you have on 2x12 triple beam of unknown species. .
Good point - The old board is Hem Fir, I thought the new board was also, but I can't read the grade stamp. I thought that the new board was Hem Fir, it's pinker and darker in color than the SPF studs that are more white. I got it at Lowes... $18 for a 2x12x16. It looks an feels nice and is heavy. I would call them and ask for someone to read the grade stamp, but I'm not confident of the competency of the workers.
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Old 01-19-2011, 07:01 AM   #44
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Looks to me more like the end of the beam is cut short of whatever is behind it, rather than a beam sitting in a pocket.

However, thanks for getting me to take a second look, in that picture the joists from both sides are supported by the beam.
You're correct about it not sitting in the pocket. The last close up picture shows it clearly.
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Old 01-19-2011, 08:27 AM   #45
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Can you post a picture of the point-of-contact between the bottom end of the 2x4"s supporting the end of the beam and the floor below them?
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